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Old 09-10-2018, 02:10 PM   #46
jorgezeraba
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To draw simply and do it well is hard. Barry Smith is able to draw a single line that is beautiful on it's own. Toth had some gorgeous work done in a more complex style but I do respect his search to simplify. I like complexity, Kirby drew a complex, disordered world. he wowed me as a kid with his work. I tend to dislike simple but I may try to draw that way as an experiment.

"The deadline is a harsh reality when it comes to drawing a monthly book. I think styles actually grow from the need to adapt a style of drawing to hit that deadline."
Very true, deadlines force a kind of evolution, Kubert and Kirby simplified linework. Both dropped more complex linework, drawing in simple bold strokes. BTW, I agree that Janson and JR were a good combo.

I have read that writers loved Sal Buscema. I though his inks on his brother in the Silver Surfer were outstanding but I never liked him as a penciller, he seemed to be mini-John to me.

"Removing excess, and leaving a drawing this is "pure." I am not opposed to detail, but it often doesn't grab my attention. I can tell when it's used to cover up anatomical issues or other problems within a drawing."

I agree but I love complexity. Barry Smith is complex, Art Adams, Steranko, Bachalo,Neal Adams, Miller and so on. Anybody can draw with detail but how many can make it orderly and look great? Great artists know how to leave certain amount of white space in addition to great detail, Art Adams does both with great skill. George Perez is weak drawing anatomy but he can add great detail to cover that, somehow it works. I cant draw a single beautiful line like Barry Smith so I have to draw a bunch of them lol.
I remember looking at issues of Barry Smith's Machine Man. While it was very detailed, as much of his work is, it worked. The storytelling was great, and he new where to leave areas blank, and where he could spend some time and really fill the page with details. I did love looking at those books.

The issue of details is suppose is very subjective. A guy like Moebius can draw something like an Arzach comic, and have all this detailed put in. And then do a much more simplistic style, like the Silver Surfer comics he did. But I could tell, he had a strong grasp of drawing.

Have you ever shown your pages to artists at cons?
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Old 09-10-2018, 02:37 PM   #47
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Originally Posted by jorgezeraba View Post
I remember looking at issues of Barry Smith's Machine Man. While it was very detailed, as much of his work is, it worked. The storytelling was great, and he new where to leave areas blank, and where he could spend some time and really fill the page with details. I did love looking at those books.

The issue of details is suppose is very subjective. A guy like Moebius can draw something like an Arzach comic, and have all this detailed put in. And then do a much more simplistic style, like the Silver Surfer comics he did. But I could tell, he had a strong grasp of drawing.

Have you ever shown your pages to artists at cons?
It's been a decade in a half since I went to cons, I showed pages to editors and artists. Brian Steelfreeze gave the most in depth critique. Kaluta was very enchouraging as was Mignola. Now I work and draw in my spare time but I have taken it more seriously since December. Art is pretty much a hobby right now.
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Old 09-11-2018, 03:14 AM   #48
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It's been a decade in a half since I went to cons, I showed pages to editors and artists. Brian Steelfreeze gave the most in depth critique. Kaluta was very enchouraging as was Mignola. Now I work and draw in my spare time but I have taken it more seriously since December. Art is pretty much a hobby right now.
I remember talking to Stelfreeze 2 years back, he was pretty chill. No pun intended. Mignola, I've only seen interviews of, seems like someone who would be great to talk to about the craft.

It's great that you still draw, keeping your enthusiasm for the craft is key. That is something I keep in mind with each new project. I used to ask myself, "How can I make the next work, better than the last one?" Now I ask myself, "How can the next project be more fun, than the last one?"

Being engaged, and having fun in the creative process, is the key to longevity. Longevity can allow for increased skill in drawing, over time.
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Old 09-11-2018, 09:10 AM   #49
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woow...i love your artworks...they're amazing:o
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Old 09-11-2018, 10:51 AM   #50
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woow...i love your artworks...they're amazing:o
Thank you.

What are you artistic influences?
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Old 09-11-2018, 09:15 PM   #51
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I remember talking to Stelfreeze 2 years back, he was pretty chill. No pun intended. Mignola, I've only seen interviews of, seems like someone who would be great to talk to about the craft.

It's great that you still draw, keeping your enthusiasm for the craft is key. That is something I keep in mind with each new project. I used to ask myself, "How can I make the next work, better than the last one?" Now I ask myself, "How can the next project be more fun, than the last one?"

Being engaged, and having fun in the creative process, is the key to longevity. Longevity can allow for increased skill in drawing, over time.
Steelfreeze is a great teacher. Thanks for the comment, I appreciate your approach and your thoughtfulness on art. The job of an artist is continual learning, I look at old pros like Neal Adams still learning so its a neverending process.
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