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Old 09-06-2018, 02:09 PM   #31
TimR
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"a part of me never stops looking at good comic work," this is true for me too. I'm afraid it's something for a small group of art fans or artists though, not what drives mass appeal. For better or worse the mass audience does not have an "eye" for art, and is more into content. And the easier pleasures of movies/ videogames.

Interesting thoughts overall -- but a little vague to me? You seem to be implying different things but not entirely straightforward. Maybe? I'm not sure, might just be reading into it...
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Old 09-07-2018, 01:41 AM   #32
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"a part of me never stops looking at good comic work," this is true for me too. I'm afraid it's something for a small group of art fans or artists though, not what drives mass appeal. For better or worse the mass audience does not have an "eye" for art, and is more into content. And the easier pleasures of movies/ videogames.

Interesting thoughts overall -- but a little vague to me? You seem to be implying different things but not entirely straightforward. Maybe? I'm not sure, might just be reading into it...
Any thing you would like me to clarify, ask away.

Videogames, I do appreciate the artistry and ingenuity that goes into making a triple a game. However I get extremely bored after about 5 minutes.

Movies however, if done properly, I feel an almost spiritual experience. Like I received some sort of communication on a deep and profound level. I feel emotions stirring within me.


Comics, I feel is much more cerebral, and all about design. The writing paints a layer of "humanity," again, if done properly. Although I am very selective on the type of writing that appeals to me. I do enjoy some humor, and well written dialogue. Peter David comes to mind, I have enjoyed much of his Spider-Man.
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Old 09-07-2018, 11:39 PM   #33
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Oh I don't know, just seemed insinuating in places lol. Not worth getting into.

I've heard about neal adams advice to trace.. Especially photos. Whose drawings does he like to trace?

I'm not a huge huge walt simonson fan... But I think the storytelling is fundamental as he says. He was a big Carl Barks admirer I know.. And Barks was a master of deceptively simple comic art. His early work can be so dead on in its staging and "acting", it's scary. Nothing flashy, just hitting the exact right note panel by panel...
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Old 09-08-2018, 10:13 AM   #34
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Oh I don't know, just seemed insinuating in places lol. Not worth getting into.

I've heard about neal adams advice to trace.. Especially photos. Whose drawings does he like to trace?

I'm not a huge huge walt simonson fan... But I think the storytelling is fundamental as he says. He was a big Carl Barks admirer I know.. And Barks was a master of deceptively simple comic art. His early work can be so dead on in its staging and "acting", it's scary. Nothing flashy, just hitting the exact right note panel by panel...
Walt has never been on artists I personally love or revisit. However, I could always acknowledge he has a method that consistently delivers quality work. He hits his deadlines, and he storytelling works. Talking to him about the mechanics of comics, panel by panel was great. I could do that all day.

Neal, liked illustrators like Norman Rockwell, and Drew Struzan. Both whose work I do see the skill in, but they don't particularly grab my attention.
I'm more of a storyteller, so guys like Moebius, Joe Kubert, guys like that, I've been "drawn" to more. I love good design, and great compositions.
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Old 09-08-2018, 09:50 PM   #35
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Bishop, thank you.
That is a 19x24 piece done in ball point pen. It took roughly 6 months to complete.
This is a masterful work.While 6 months is a huge chunk of time the end results look worth it. Also, it's not like you can erase when you work in ink. I used to draw, quite a bit it ball point, the consistency and darkness of line worked for me, now I am pretty much all digital. I look forward to your new superhero work.
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Old 09-09-2018, 08:00 AM   #36
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This is a masterful work.While 6 months is a huge chunk of time the end results look worth it. Also, it's not like you can erase when you work in ink. I used to draw, quite a bit it ball point, the consistency and darkness of line worked for me, now I am pretty much all digital. I look forward to your new superhero work.
Thanks artman. My mindset going into the ball point pen drawing was of a fine artist. I wanted to see how far I could push the detail. It's still a drawing I am very proud of. I drew it out of ego, and wanted to boast how "insane" I could be. Ego is not necessarily a bad thing. However, now a days I prefer to be more sincere in my drawing. More authentic in my reasons for drawing.

As for the comics work, my interest is to find a way to draw comics that is not so "painful." The last pages I did titled, "Wall Breakers," really pushed me into another level. I learned a lot from it, but making the comic was very grueling. I did manage to get it published and so, the effort was not in vain.

With the new superhero pages, the creation process will be more entertaining. The pages are all laid out, and the lettering has been put in. Now its about finding the right style. I will get it right, I am certain of it.
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Old 09-09-2018, 09:59 AM   #37
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Thanks artman. My mindset going into the ball point pen drawing was of a fine artist. I wanted to see how far I could push the detail. It's still a drawing I am very proud of. I drew it out of ego, and wanted to boast how "insane" I could be. Ego is not necessarily a bad thing. However, now a days I prefer to be more sincere in my drawing. More authentic in my reasons for drawing.

As for the comics work, my interest is to find a way to draw comics that is not so "painful." The last pages I did titled, "Wall Breakers," really pushed me into another level. I learned a lot from it, but making the comic was very grueling. I did manage to get it published and so, the effort was not in vain.

With the new superhero pages, the creation process will be more entertaining. The pages are all laid out, and the lettering has been put in. Now its about finding the right style. I will get it right, I am certain of it.
I like your attitude.It looks to me that you tailor your approach to the area you're working in while still testing your limits. You seem to take a strong intellectual approach. Me, I vacillate between the intellectual and just get in the zone and draw mode.
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Old 09-09-2018, 01:43 PM   #38
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I like your attitude.It looks to me that you tailor your approach to the area you're working in while still testing your limits. You seem to take a strong intellectual approach. Me, I vacillate between the intellectual and just get in the zone and draw mode.
I think when it comes to purely drawing I think "expression," can be a priority.
However, with comics, I always found it to be more cerebral. Designing the page, and deciding how many panels would be on a page, the shape of the panels, and how the world balloons and drawings within the panels, all tell a story clearly in an aesthetic way; While dealing with the limited space on each page...
There is a lot to consider, but its kind of interesting to play the "limitation game."

Drawing in small panels, but giving the illusion of space and depth. Being a master at comics, is like being a master of limitation, it's very difficult, but impressive once achieved.

By the way, who are you're artistic influences?
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Old 09-09-2018, 02:09 PM   #39
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I think when it comes to purely drawing I think "expression," can be a priority.
However, with comics, I always found it to be more cerebral. Designing the page, and deciding how many panels would be on a page, the shape of the panels, and how the world balloons and drawings within the panels, all tell a story clearly in an aesthetic way; While dealing with the limited space on each page...
There is a lot to consider, but its kind of interesting to play the "limitation game."

Drawing in small panels, but giving the illusion of space and depth. Being a master at comics, is like being a master of limitation, it's very difficult, but impressive once achieved.

By the way, who are you're artistic influences?
There's many. Adams, Steranko, Wrightson, and Kirby just to name a few. Lately i have been looking at Kelley Jones and Mignola and Mike MacMahon. In general when I look at art my influence is the high contrast art guys, they tend to be greater designers of the human figure rather than illustrators. They're cartoonists. Who's yours?

Your take on creating comics is very good one. The comic book page is quite a challenge as you outlined and one that daunted me until recently. I'm more comfortable with storytelling now.
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Old 09-09-2018, 02:51 PM   #40
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There's many. Adams, Steranko, Wrightson, and Kirby just to name a few. Lately i have been looking at Kelley Jones and Mignola and Mike MacMahon. In general when I look at art my influence is the high contrast art guys, they tend to be greater designers of the human figure rather than illustrators. They're cartoonists. Who's yours?

Your take on creating comics is very good one. The comic book page is quite a challenge as you outlined and one that daunted me until recently. I'm more comfortable with storytelling now.
There are many artists whose work I appreciate. However there are a few who I have revisited over the years. Joe Kubert, Moebius, Kirby, Mazzuchelli, Alex Toth, to name a few.

I love great storytelling and great design, and economy. I love seeing old comics work, from Kirby, Ditko, Everett. There was a sincerity to their work, and they had to learn how to produce comics quickly. I especially love alot of the EC Comic artist, Jonny Craig, Jack Davis, great work from a different time.

If you like high contrast, are you familiar with Jorge Zaffino, or John Paul Leon?
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Old 09-09-2018, 05:17 PM   #41
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There are many artists whose work I appreciate. However there are a few who I have revisited over the years. Joe Kubert, Moebius, Kirby, Mazzuchelli, Alex Toth, to name a few.

I love great storytelling and great design, and economy. I love seeing old comics work, from Kirby, Ditko, Everett. There was a sincerity to their work, and they had to learn how to produce comics quickly. I especially love alot of the EC Comic artist, Jonny Craig, Jack Davis, great work from a different time.

If you like high contrast, are you familiar with Jorge Zaffino, or John Paul Leon?
Joe Kubert is a master artist, same with Moebius. Toth has done some great work but he had a tendency to simplify too much for me. I do like JPL. I have not seen Zaffino lately but he is a very accomplished, I like his stuff also. I like your list.
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Old 09-10-2018, 06:12 AM   #42
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Joe Kubert is a master artist, same with Moebius. Toth has done some great work but he had a tendency to simplify too much for me. I do like JPL. I have not seen Zaffino lately but he is a very accomplished, I like his stuff also. I like your list.
I agree with you on Toth. He can get overly simplistic for my taste. However there is work he has done that is deceptively simple. I do appreciate his sense of design, and do see him as a master artist.

Another artist I forgot to mention was Doug Wildey. He basically drew anything and everything, and I love the energy he had with his work. The "get it done," attitude was really inspirational to me.

What are your thoughts on John Romita JR?
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Old 09-10-2018, 09:16 AM   #43
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I agree with you on Toth. He can get overly simplistic for my taste. However there is work he has done that is deceptively simple. I do appreciate his sense of design, and do see him as a master artist.

Another artist I forgot to mention was Doug Wildey. He basically drew anything and everything, and I love the energy he had with his work. The "get it done," attitude was really inspirational to me.

What are your thoughts on John Romita JR?
John Romita Jr strikes me the same as John Buscema. They are craftsmen, they get work done and meet deadlines and are generally good and that is their strength and a weakness. They rarely strive for greatness aithough they have the capacity for it. Buscema's art suffered when he became the lead artist at Marvel when Kirby left and he increased his workload. Romita found his voice working with Frank Miller on the DD limited series. Overall he is a consummate pro who gets it done but occasionally will show more. I like him but I dont study his work.
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Old 09-10-2018, 12:22 PM   #44
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John Romita Jr strikes me the same as John Buscema. They are craftsmen, they get work done and meet deadlines and are generally good and that is their strength and a weakness. They rarely strive for greatness aithough they have the capacity for it. Buscema's art suffered when he became the lead artist at Marvel when Kirby left and he increased his workload. Romita found his voice working with Frank Miller on the DD limited series. Overall he is a consummate pro who gets it done but occasionally will show more. I like him but I dont study his work.
The deadline is a harsh reality when it comes to drawing a monthly book. I think styles actually grow from the need to adapt a style of drawing to hit that deadline. I remember seeing Romita JR original pages when he was drawing Wolverine with Mark Millar writing. It was very inspiring seeing his rough drawings. They were very loose, but all the information was there. The perspective was there, and all it took was a great inker to pull it together. Klaus Janson being probably the best inker for John. I think John, is a great storyteller, and this is by far his major strength.

About Buscema, I always loved his work, I think Tom Palmer on Buscema was gold, but then again Palmer was great on everything. I think John Buscema's Silver Surfer is gorgeous in its boldness and simplicity. Classic stuff. With Chic Stone inking him, pure gold.

As I got older, I really learned to appreciate Sal Buscema's art. I especially love his Spider-Man, which actually was my favorite run on Spider-Man, of all time. Again, his storytelling was so clean, and straight forward. No fluff, no fat, clean and direct. I loved that.

Personally, I don't mind the artist, having to strip down his work, and finding a way to hit the deadline. I think in the right hands, it gives way to a lot clearer storytelling, and a lot bolder, stronger drawings. Heavier lines, more black areas, sillouttes, and better compositions.

Removing excess, and leaving a drawing this is "pure." I am not opposed to detail, but it often doesn't grab my attention. I can tell when it's used to cover up anatomical issues or other problems within a drawing.
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Old 09-10-2018, 02:23 PM   #45
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The deadline is a harsh reality when it comes to drawing a monthly book. I think styles actually grow from the need to adapt a style of drawing to hit that deadline. I remember seeing Romita JR original pages when he was drawing Wolverine with Mark Millar writing. It was very inspiring seeing his rough drawings. They were very loose, but all the information was there. The perspective was there, and all it took was a great inker to pull it together. Klaus Janson being probably the best inker for John. I think John, is a great storyteller, and this is by far his major strength.

About Buscema, I always loved his work, I think Tom Palmer on Buscema was gold, but then again Palmer was great on everything. I think John Buscema's Silver Surfer is gorgeous in its boldness and simplicity. Classic stuff. With Chic Stone inking him, pure gold.

As I got older, I really learned to appreciate Sal Buscema's art. I especially love his Spider-Man, which actually was my favorite run on Spider-Man, of all time. Again, his storytelling was so clean, and straight forward. No fluff, no fat, clean and direct. I loved that.

Personally, I don't mind the artist, having to strip down his work, and finding a way to hit the deadline. I think in the right hands, it gives way to a lot clearer storytelling, and a lot bolder, stronger drawings. Heavier lines, more black areas, sillouttes, and better compositions.

Removing excess, and leaving a drawing this is "pure." I am not opposed to detail, but it often doesn't grab my attention. I can tell when it's used to cover up anatomical issues or other problems within a drawing.
To draw simply and do it well is hard. Barry Smith is able to draw a single line that is beautiful on it's own. Toth had some gorgeous work done in a more complex style but I do respect his search to simplify. I like complexity, Kirby drew a complex, disordered world. he wowed me as a kid with his work. I tend to dislike simple but I may try to draw that way as an experiment.

"The deadline is a harsh reality when it comes to drawing a monthly book. I think styles actually grow from the need to adapt a style of drawing to hit that deadline."
Very true, deadlines force a kind of evolution, Kubert and Kirby simplified linework. Both dropped more complex linework, drawing in simple bold strokes. BTW, I agree that Janson and JR were a good combo.

I have read that writers loved Sal Buscema. I though his inks on his brother in the Silver Surfer were outstanding but I never liked him as a penciller, he seemed to be mini-John to me.

"Removing excess, and leaving a drawing this is "pure." I am not opposed to detail, but it often doesn't grab my attention. I can tell when it's used to cover up anatomical issues or other problems within a drawing."

I agree but I love complexity. Barry Smith is complex, Art Adams, Steranko, Bachalo,Neal Adams, Miller and so on. Anybody can draw with detail but how many can make it orderly and look great? Great artists know how to leave certain amount of white space in addition to great detail, Art Adams does both with great skill. George Perez is weak drawing anatomy but he can add great detail to cover that, somehow it works. I cant draw a single beautiful line like Barry Smith so I have to draw a bunch of them lol.
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