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Old 03-08-2018, 02:16 PM   #16
Scribbly
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OK. We are all learning here.
For me, the Best comic's Editor ever was Stan Lee,( the comic's revolution). That should be the name of an Award for comics Editors.


Also, each comic's Editor, before start working on any role in the comic's Edition is a writer, writing related degree, or must have some skills on writing, regardless if they want pursue career as comics writers or prose afterwards.
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Old 03-14-2018, 02:46 AM   #17
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I think that a couple of things are happening... a lot of people don't know what an Editor should do, and so they attribute lots of non-editing things to one... and a lot of companies just throw stuff at an Editor because they can, and what's a guy to do when corporate tells you "this is your job working for us"?

To my thinking... an Editor's primary function is to help the creators produce the best vision of their work possible. So, the writer/artist/colorist/letterer all funnel their work through an Editor who tries to guide them towards the best version of their story.

That means eliminating errors, helping ensure the story on the page matches the creator's vision or the story, continuity (when it applies to characters or story arcs) and all that sort of stuff.

Now, in corporate world, the "Editor" is often more of a Project Manager role too... being a person responsible for hiring/finding new talent and managing publishing schedules and so forth... but these are not editing tasks to me, just something that happens at a company who tries to cut their budgets by combining roles as much as possible.
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Old 03-14-2018, 05:27 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stewart Vernon View Post

To my thinking... an Editor's primary function is to help the creators produce the best vision of their work possible. So, the writer/artist/colorist/letterer all funnel their work through an Editor who tries to guide them towards the best version of their story.
That means eliminating errors, helping ensure the story on the page matches the creator's vision or the story, continuity (when it applies to characters or story arcs) and all that sort of stuff.
All these functions are by itself part of the Project's management role.
"Help artists to produce the best vision of their work possible" is only possible through wise MANAGEMENT. Artistic management, applied to comics books. Aka: Editing.
Regardless if such management is also hiring the talent or not.
Editing is management applied to writing, visual, audio and film media.
EDITING and MANAGEMENT the two faces of the same coin.

Management :1. the act or manner of managing; handling, directing, or control.
2. the process of dealing with or controlling things or people.

Editing :
1. prepare (written material) for publication by correcting, condensing, or otherwise modifying it.
"Volume I was edited by J. Johnson"
synonyms: correcting, check, copyedit, improve, emend, polish.

2. be editor of (a newspaper or magazine).
be the editor of, direct, run, manage, head, lead, supervise, oversee, preside over; informal be the boss of
"he edited the school newspaper"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Management

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Editing
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Old 03-21-2018, 02:26 AM   #19
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I think I, and some others, are saying that what Editors have been employed to do and what *should* be the role of an Editor are often different things.

I've worked jobs that had proper Editor positions... i.e., I was a team lead and writer managing my own projects and other writers who worked at my direction... then I in turn had a manager that assigned my work... but we, as a department, also employed an Editor through which we all fed our writing assignments and she made corrections/suggestions and helped to maintain uniformity in our department's output... but she (the Editor) was in no way our manager or performing any semblance of a management role.

Unfortunately, many companies employ "Editors" in what should be Project Management roles in lieu of hiring both a manager and an editor... and that results in the confusion I believe some have with what the role of an Editor should be.

What I'm saying is... your Editor can be your manager... but if so, then he is a managing editor or something like that... and you shouldn't make the assumption that all Editors have all of those responsibilities, because they really shouldn't.
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Old 03-21-2018, 11:32 AM   #20
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Thank you, Stewart Vernon, for your post. It will hopefully clarify the differences in the role a bit better.

That's part of the problem: the role of editor is often confusing due to the experience and/or opinion of those who have or have not worked either in the position themselves or with someone in that role. Someone who has worked with an editor as a manager will only think of those specific duties, disregarding the quality and clarity of the actual work due to their influence. The flip side also exists. Then there are those who assume the role is this, this, and/or this.

I'd like to share the chapter titles for a book I have in my personal library entitled "The Longman Guide to Technical Editing", which I believe is a great reference book on more than just technical editing:

1. Editing: The Big Picture
2. Readers, Users, Browsers, Problem Solvers...
3. Collaborating with Writers
4. Marking Paper Copy
5. Marking Digital Copy
6 Electronic Editing
7. Basic Copyediting: An Introduction
8. Copyediting for Consistency
9. Grammar and Usage
10. Spelling and Punctuation
11. Quantitative and Technical Material
12. Proofreading
13. Comprehensive Editing: Definition and Process
14. Style: Definition and Sentence Structures
15. Style: Verbs and Other Words
16. Organization: The Architecture of Information
17. Visual Design
18. Editing Illustrations
19. Editing Websites
20. Legal and Ethical Issues in Editing
21. Project Management

Notice the last chapter title.

Three other books I highly recommend are The Elements of Editing: A Modern Guide for Editors and Journalists, The Editor's Companion, and especially The McGraw-Hill Desk Reference for Editors, Writers, and Proofreaders. They explain editing processes extremely well, likewise not focussing on the management aspects.
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Old 03-22-2018, 01:50 PM   #21
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As I see, you do like to see yourself as an Editor working only in the writing side of the comics production. Assisting creators to achieve their goals.

I don't see any reference on or over artwork sequential related chorus that are essential and vital for a mainstream Comic's book Editor. Neither on hiring or selecting, nor coordinating and managing or supervising talent.
If you are talking merely of a prose books Editor, your depiction of activities would be correct.
But these falls short for a full Comic's Book Editor duties:

Quote:
Editing: The Big Picture
2. Readers, Users, Browsers, Problem Solvers...
3. Collaborating with Writers
4. Marking Paper Copy
5. Marking Digital Copy
6 Electronic Editing
7. Basic Copyediting: An Introduction
8. Copyediting for Consistency
9. Grammar and Usage
10. Spelling and Punctuation
11. Quantitative and Technical Material
12. Proofreading
13. Comprehensive Editing: Definition and Process
14. Style: Definition and Sentence Structures
15. Style: Verbs and Other Words
16. Organization: The Architecture of Information
17. Visual Design
18. Editing Illustrations
19. Editing Websites
20. Legal and Ethical Issues in Editing
21. Project Management
I rather see myself as an artist helping the editor on achieving HIS vision.
That assures the next job for any artist.

On different scenario, working on my own independent self published project
The help of a writer on all the writing stages would be of great use.
Hiring a writer for assisting the author on perfecting the literary vision is always a good idea.IMHO.
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Old 03-22-2018, 02:01 PM   #22
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That isolates my point, Scribbly: It's your experience and opinion that shape this perspective.

Outside of corporate and even some small press structures, editors don't manage in comics: they are quality control.

I can appreciate your stance, but realize this isn't a "me" thing and that this is how editing functions outside of your exclusively management-based perspective, especially for the freelance editor community.
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Old 03-23-2018, 05:27 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Colle View Post
That isolates my point, Scribbly: It's your experience and opinion that shape this perspective.

Outside of corporate and even some small press structures, editors don't manage in comics: they are quality control.

I can appreciate your stance, but realize this isn't a "me" thing and that this is how editing functions outside of your exclusively management-based perspective, especially for the freelance editor community.
Yeah, probably you are right. But from my POV and experience, the guy who only does quality control for comics is not the real Editor, but the Assistant Editor.
Outside the corporate and even in some small press structures the role of Editor is taken over by the Publisher or the same Author.
Also, the quality of a comics book is the result of the selection, hiring and coordination of the talents that are going to work in the book. Such selection is made by the Editor ( the decisions maker). Or, the publisher or the author for small press on non mainstream comics books. Coordination with printer and distributor as well.
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Old 03-27-2018, 01:57 AM   #24
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Corporate world is a funny thing, even outside of comics.

I'm working part-time right now as a Technical Editor, but I'm definitely soon to be doing some non-Editing tasks. What it all boiled down to, in planning the project, was... They needed a Technical Editor, and that's how I got the gig... but I actually have more Technical Writing experience than the Technical Writer. Problem is, the Writer is more experience with this particular project and the client... so it is best for this project if the Writer does the heavy lifting and I function solely as an Editor for the first couple of revisions... but then prior to submitting to the client, I will take over and handle the page layout because that's where my experience comes in handy.

If we were bidding a new project from the start, I could be a Writer/Editor and get up to speed along the way... or we could have a more experienced page layout person doing the Writing and I could be a pure Editor. But I came into the middle of the project when someone dropped out, and we're working things in the way that makes the most sense right now.

Thus, it's easy to blur the lines on the role of an Editor.
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