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Old 08-10-2009, 12:36 PM   #27
Scribbly
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Location: Wicked Salem, MA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kep!
Scribbly, I think what everyone here is trying to say is "it ain't my job man, but I'll gladly do it for a price". Crass as that sounds, it's true. It is the artist's job (or artists' jobs) to make sure their work is ready for primetime. As the letterer, I'm the last person who should be trying to fix whacked out pages...the penciler should do it, the inker has it in his own best interest to do it and the colorist is ALREADY doing the work...he might as well save it correctly and call it a day. If the art is not ready for print by the time it gets to me, then they have got serious issues with their work-flow. At the end of the production cycle is NOT the time to fix something as basic as wonky artwork.
Kep!, understood, but.

Actually, it is up to the person who manage and
is in "charge of the project" to require about the format, size and resolution in
what the final artwork should be presented and sent.
And is "up to him" to decide who is the person, as part of his art team, who's going to do this.

Blame them, and not the artist, when the artwork came in incorrect size,
resolution or format.
Because, is what they are requesting the artists to send is what the artists
are giving to you.
And not otherwise.
Having this person, the manager, doing his work right and beig clever and especific.
Not one, including the artists, should have problems in the line work.
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