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ArtisticBlasts
09-17-2006, 03:17 AM
I'm new to inking, so I'd better ask this question. Is it okay for me to ink by using only trackpen (w/ various tip sizes)? I can't seem to use brush well, and I don't want to dirty the drawings. LMK about this. :blink:

MadCow Menu
09-17-2006, 08:35 AM
You can use whatever you are most comfortable with as long as it looks good, but you might want to practive with other tools like the brush--- it's always best to be well rounded.

ArtisticBlasts
09-17-2006, 10:53 PM
Thanks for the support, Ken. By the way, does brushes can be used on linearts? As far as I know, brushes is good only for blocking big black spots, or is there more uses of brushes? Also, how do we make "hatch"es effect in ink?

MadCow Menu
09-18-2006, 06:47 PM
By the way, does brushes can be used on linearts?
Brushes are definatly more than just filling in blacks. One you have control of a brush you can use it to get great textures and much better and more "organic" looking line art. A lot of inkers you almost nothing but brush. I use it for between 50 to 90% of the page--- depending what's on the page. (buildings and anything with a straight line I use some kind of pen.)
Also, how do we make "hatch"es effect in ink?
Crosshatching? That is just lines overlapping lines to give a tone.
Is this what you mean?
http://z.about.com/d/drawsketch/1/0/h/1/ink-crosshatching.jpg

GW.Fisher
09-18-2006, 09:50 PM
Brush inking:
http://inkwellgraphics.homestead.com/files/Avengersforever1.jpg

ArtisticBlasts
09-19-2006, 12:13 PM
Brushes are definatly more than just filling in blacks. One you have control of a brush you can use it to get great textures and much better and more "organic" looking line art. A lot of inkers you almost nothing but brush. I use it for between 50 to 90% of the page--- depending what's on the page. (buildings and anything with a straight line I use some kind of pen.) How could you managed to draw linearts with brush? And do all lines with only brushes?

Crosshatching? That is just lines overlapping lines to give a tone. Is this what you mean? No, it wasn't what I meant. What I meant's this :

http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c317/artisticblasts/scraps/sample.jpg

Numbered parts. Let me know, thanks.

ArtisticBlasts
09-19-2006, 12:18 PM
Brush inking:
http://inkwellgraphics.homestead.com/files/Avengersforever1.jpg It's Carlos Pacheco's work, isn't it? Still keeps me wondering on how do you people managed to do traditional inkings mainly with brushes :blink:

Biofungus
09-19-2006, 12:47 PM
That's commonly called "feathering" (just as a way of differentiating the two).

It's also dependent upon the inker. Some will go with the tip, and will stroke into the black area (using very light to heavier pressure). Most inkers will start from the black area and stroke outward (using lighter pressure as they stroke).

Brushwork is all about control. Start with a lower size, like a 2, to help you get used to it (some advanced inkers are so good, they can get that kind of control with a 3 or even a 4 brush). A quality brush is key, because you don't want hairs falling out, and you want it to maintain that oval shape (that tapers into a fine point when loaded with ink). You might also consider starting with a dip pen (nib with a holder). I find that to be a nice seque between premade pens (ala technical pens) and brushes. You still have pen control, but you can add pressure to the nib and vary the line weight.

GW.Fisher
09-19-2006, 08:19 PM
BioF: My feathering is done last, after all the other linework is done. Gives me a better perspective on varying the lineweights as needed.

And I find it easier to do my feathering with as little ink in the brush as possible, maybe dipping into the bottle a quarter inch at most. I dip the brush more often, but this allows me to achieve a finer point on the thin part of the thin-to-thick lines.

ArtB: I practiced for about 6 months with nothing but a brush before I began to get a feel for it. Six years and several Pro gigs later and I'm still learning, so don't worry if it doesn't come together right away.