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prochristi86
05-06-2006, 02:07 PM
Hey,

I'm currently using Blue Line Pro Traditional Art Boards, Brite White (they have a smooth, non-toothy surface). They're fine, but a little expensive. Considering that I'll need to be ordering a whole lot more of them very soon, does anyone know where I can find boards that are a little cheaper?

Thanks,

James Smith

Justice41
05-06-2006, 05:42 PM
Post your per sheet or pack price then go here to check these pre-lined and ruled, Boards out. I use these and they are slick for pencils inks and paints.
http://www.eonprod.com/boards.html

prochristi86
05-07-2006, 11:53 AM
Eeeh! These cost $27 for 25 sheets, but BLP Comic Book Art Boards (http://www.bluelinepro.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=BL&Category_Code=ab) cost only $15 for 24 sheets. Hmm.. I may have to go with BLP, but those Eon boards do look good. BLP allows you to buy 100 sheets for $48 -- does Eon/anyone else have anything comparable?

Thanks,

James

Dannthr
05-07-2006, 03:23 PM
I bought the BLP Full Trim pack o' 100 and I'm pleased with them. Can't argue with 50 cents a board.

It's thicker than anything I can get in town at that price and I'm pretty pleased with them. (Though, I do own a bunch of Bainbridge 1000 series hot press illustration boards which is ten times better but much pricier).

My only complaint about the BLP Pro Series is that they can't take a crowquill. They just tear up. They're great for brushes, though.

ALTHOUGH, a watercolor wash does muck up the fabric of the paper a bit and the pigmet settles like crap across its surface (that's what I have the big bainbridges for, as well as they're big enough to do poster sized art).

But seriously... 50 cents a piece? Not bad.

prochristi86
05-07-2006, 06:45 PM
What kind of art board works well for crowqull inking? I've done some (although I'm not good at it) on BLP boards, and you're right; the BLP boards don't stand up well to inking with crowquills.

Dannthr
05-07-2006, 08:55 PM
As I understand it, the premier series BLP boards are just right for everything, as they seem to be thick as hell -- however, they're quite expensive. That's just what I hear, I haven't tried them.

If you buy their 12 pack, they're like 5 bucks a piece. I imagine you're working with serious illustration BOARD at that point.

For crow quill I am satisfied with smooth bristol, drawing paper (but it's toothy), and the Bainbridges I was talking about earlier.

I haven't tried the EON boards.

For my purposes the BLPs will hold up fine under light crowquill and all the filler can be done with brush or pen or marker, etc...

The Bainbridge 1000 series Hot Press Illustration board is available in 15 x 20, 20 x 30, or 30 x 40 inches, I think... Remember that the general ratio for a comic board is 10 x 15 or 2:3. There's plenty of room to play on those big illustration boards.

And they're sturdy enough that you could basically put anything on them.

But you might want to hear a second opinion, since I don't like to order big supplies of things over the internet before I try them in person -- I was just lucky with BLP as a solitary store carried a small pack of boards for me to try.

I've been satisfied with BLP's customer service as well.

Justice41
05-08-2006, 01:24 AM
Here's something I drew on and inked with Crow-quills on Eon Boards. I also did a bit o ink-wash as well and nary a paper shredding or anything screwy. The board is thick about as thick as the old Image Boards. You want a close-up of detail's to show how crisply the paper took the quills let me know and I'll scan something in. Oh and guys you get what you pay for. Pay cheap get cheap.
http://www.architectural-illustrations.com/images/wolvywolves2.jpg

Cap
05-09-2006, 02:14 AM
I've been using Eon myself recently, about 96 sheets for 67$ seemed like a good value. It handles pencils very well, I'm an erase-o-holic sometimes and I hardly see any ghosting at all, or wear on the paper. I used to draw on just vanilla Strathmore bristol and their vellum before, which I still do for more traditional pieces.

prochristi86
05-09-2006, 12:46 PM
Wow, Justice41! Not only does the image look awesome, further, the board looks like it took the ink really well! I think once I get a really good handle on drawing, I'll start buying Eon paper for general drawing, and this Bainbridge stuff for larger art.

Cap, I'm an erase-o-holic too; I guess I'll have to check Eon's stuff out soon!

James

Justice41
05-09-2006, 01:03 PM
Yeah Brett at Eon is a member here and his stuff was recently changed because inking on the paper was iffy at best. He's a great guy and we should support each other. Plus the boards are great, buy enough and you can also have your logo printed on the boards for your studio.
You guys may want to invest in some non photo blue pencils and Lead holder leads. The Leads are a bit more expensive but they are harder and last much longer than an individual pencil and you don't need to erase if you don't want to.
http://www.architectural-illustrations.com/images/wolvywolves.jpg

MadCow Menu
05-09-2006, 05:22 PM
I cut my own from pads of Bristol Strathmore.

GW.Fisher
05-09-2006, 09:46 PM
Me too. 20 sheets for $12.00.

Justice41
05-09-2006, 10:05 PM
I still have tons of Bristol that I bought from Strathmore, that I cut down myself, but for specific projects a nice clean professional finish is nice to have as an option.

Gonzogoose
05-09-2006, 10:21 PM
How do you cut them accurately though? I couldn't cut a straight line with a ruler. lol.

Gonzogoose
05-09-2006, 10:25 PM
For the record, I was using the ones from the Kubert Store (smooth, 2-ply - for pencils), but their prices have gone up since I bought any.

Justice41
05-09-2006, 10:57 PM
I made a template out of Thin Plexiglass, plus I have a parallel rule on my table. It's 52 inches across and I can just slide the paper underneath but the easiest way is to go to Kinko's and use the paper cutter there.

Gonzogoose
05-09-2006, 11:27 PM
Ah cool, I didn't even know they had a paper cutter there. lol.

sgm
05-10-2006, 12:38 AM
Me too. 20 sheets for $12.00.
Is that the 300 series smooth finish?

I get those big 18"x24" 2-ply smooth finish 400 series pads at about $33.00 USD ($40.00 Canadian). I can cut 30 pages from one pad.

monkeyboy
05-10-2006, 01:21 AM
I wrote to someone from Strathmore and they said Marvel uses the 500 series Strathmore Bristol board. It's bright white and takes a good ink line. I couldn't find it at the local art stores (they only had the 300 series) but I ordered a pad from dickblick.com then just cut them down from there.
I like the plexiglass template idea. Where'd you get the plexiglass cut?

Dannthr
05-10-2006, 02:31 AM
I guess the art stores around here don't sell Bristol as heavy as the pro BLP stuff I get. The strathmores are like... 100# while the BLP pro paper is more like 130-150. They can take washes much better than the bristol can. Less buckling/rippling.

The 500 series premier paper that BLP sells, which is like 4 bucks a piece, is actually 3-ply 100# rounding up to about 300# a page. That's some pretty HEAVY paper and is probably perfect for heavy ink/water washes. It's also supposed to be able to withstand crowquillin' fairly nicely.

Justice41
05-10-2006, 12:25 PM
I got my Bristol from Strathmore because I have a small business involved in Illustration work. I bought 100 sheets of the 500 series 5 ply vellum surface finish that Marvel was using at the time. If I had cut every sheet down I would have gotten 300 sheets of 11''x 17''. But I sometimes use the full sheets for larger paintings in watercolor or acrylics.
I cut the Plexi myself. But almost any glass company or glass installer should be able to cut you a template.

MadCow Menu
05-10-2006, 07:05 PM
Cutting your own is nice.
I get the pads of Strathmore Bristol in eaither vellum or smooth depending on my mood. 20 sheets at 100 lbs for under 15 bucks.

How do you cut them accurately though? I couldn't cut a straight line with a ruler. lol.
I cut 3 inches off one of the vertical sides. I use a ruler and scissors. It doesn't have to be perfect--- it'll be trimmed off anyway in print. And yea, Kinkos and places like that have big paper cutters that you can use.

prochristi86
05-11-2006, 12:16 AM
I like the idea of cutting your own sheets, but is the $12 Strathmore stuff better quality than the BLP boards? I think they were about the same price; maybe $15, though.

James

Justice41
05-11-2006, 12:57 AM
Remember, you get what you pay for.

MadCow Menu
05-12-2006, 07:52 PM
I like the idea of cutting your own sheets, but is the $12 Strathmore stuff better quality than the BLP boards? I think they were about the same price; maybe $15, though.

James
Yes, the strathmore is as good or better than the high quality pre-lined sheets.

Remember, you get what you pay for.
Yea, you pay more for the pre-lined cause they are cut and pre-lined for you. Not really all that necessary if you have a ruler.

Justice41
05-12-2006, 10:28 PM
I'm talking Quality and not about Pre-lined but about the difference between other Bristol makers and Strathmore. Canson makes a decent bristol which is very bright white but inking is iffy at best. Not all Bristol's are the same Strathmore will always be better.

TAP_LEGION
05-13-2006, 03:16 AM
I think Michaels still carries the 300 Strathmore in bristol and vellum surfaces...havent seen the 500 there in a long while. You can use the 40% coupon that comes in the Sunday paper and save a few bucks.Hobby Lobby carries the 500 series sheets , but their prices are really high.

Jerry's Artarama has alot to choose from and their prices are pretty decent as well.

I usually buy the 500 series boards that measure 32"x40" and cut them down to whatever size I need. I also on occasion buy some Crescent illustration board and gesso/sand the surface smooth....its like making your own poor man's bristol in a sense.

jimmycakes
05-15-2006, 02:18 PM
I usually buy Blue-line's Strathmore and it takes ink and watercolor like a champ. I'd love to make my own boards, but it is a hassel. If you go to kinkos, they usually will cut whole stacks of paper for you for a dollar a cut. So, you'd probably only need two cuts on a giant stack. Of course, if you are using 22x33in paper you're out of luck at kinkos. I think they can only take up to 12x18, but I'm sure it depends on the store. I worked at a copy shop that had a 36" mamouth cutter that could slice through phone books. Check your local shops. I like the Eon sample pack I got at a show. I really want to try out more of their product. I'll have to talk to them about my next book.

JMan
05-24-2006, 01:37 PM
I'm a fan of the Strathmore 2-ply pads - cut it myself as a lot of you do - or I have them cut it on their giant paper cutters at the art store. There's something more satisfying about cutting and crafting your own stack of Bristol. Guess that's the artist inside.

DungeonMasterJm
05-24-2006, 03:02 PM
I use to work at Strathmore up until last year and they do make the paper for Marvel comics. The bluelines on the paper are printed elsewhere though not at Strathmore.

It'll be interesting to see how people feel about Strathmore in the next year or so. The company has been sold (or is being sold) - again. I don't see why the formula of the paper should/would change but you never know.

I know my old coworkers are kinda hoping Canson buys Strathmore because it's like the next town over and they could probably keep their jobs. It's a bit of a sad story actually. In the past 6 or 8 years something like 250+ people have been let go and only about 60 people still work at Strathmore because of big business buying the name and trying to increase profits while cutting costs.

DM Jim

wrd
05-27-2006, 09:31 PM
I use smooth -Bristol board also. I tend to stick with prismacolor pencils for color/adobe photoshop. For inks a pigma micron and touch up with adobe photoshop.

Emerald Warrior
06-06-2006, 11:26 PM
Is there some kind of guide or reference for the self taught beginner penciler far as pickin yer paper goes?

Eon and all these other names are great but I have no clue of one from the other. I rather thought there was a standard for comic art. It seems to me that there some for pencils, pencils and ink and then it depends on the inker's taste of crowquill or brush.

I'm new to comic drawing boards, pencils only and affordable. Advice?

Justice41
06-07-2006, 12:15 AM
I've spent years pursuing the perfect Bristol, the whitest best surface for inks pencils colors. No such thing. Paper is just never going to be consistent because it's made form wood.
EON Boards are very close to what Image used to use Canson makes a very good Bristol, very white nice finish. Experiment with the cheap stuff you can buy at Michael's then look for the same quality in pre-lined boards.
Eon makes my hand cut Bristol sheets look yellow in comparison.
But I use EON because of it's finished look. I still use my other hand cut stuff for most everything. My hand cut stuff is durable beyond any other Strathmore stuff I'e ever used.

sgm
06-07-2006, 01:29 AM
I agree with the point about the lack of consistency with paper. Even the high quality 400 series bristol from Strathmore sometimes has spots on it that are smoother than other areas, making it harder to put down light pencils.

A tip Clement Sauve gave me was to lightly run an eraser over the page beforehand to get some tooth on it.

Erick Cruz
06-07-2006, 05:55 PM
Is there some kind of guide or reference for the self taught beginner penciler far as pickin yer paper goes?

Eon and all these other names are great but I have no clue of one from the other. I rather thought there was a standard for comic art. It seems to me that there some for pencils, pencils and ink and then it depends on the inker's taste of crowquill or brush.

I'm new to comic drawing boards, pencils only and affordable. Advice?


All it takes is going to your local art supply store and looking at the materials yourself and see which will be more adequate for you.

When i firs started buying Strathmore Bristol pads i got the 300 series vellum pads (toothy surface) they were alright for penciling but years later when i tried inking on them the ink would bleed so i switched to the smooth surface which takes ink better.

A couple months back i bought 3 sheets of the 400 series smooth and i love how it holds pencil and ink i dont think i'll ever go back to the 300 Series after my current supply runs out.

Emerald Warrior
06-07-2006, 10:51 PM
Thanks, all.

I shall go exploring an experimentin.

Erick Cruz
06-18-2006, 06:38 AM
i have a question (sorry Emerald Warrior if i hijack this thread but it's related)

whats the difference between the 400 series and the 500 series bristol and is it worth the investment?

sgm
06-18-2006, 05:03 PM
i have a question (sorry Emerald Warrior if i hijack this thread but it's related)

whats the difference between the 400 series and the 500 series bristol and is it worth the investment?

Other than it's price (costs almost twice as much as 400 series), 500 series has superior archival quality. It's also pure cotton and the "Plate" finish is so smooth it will always give you an even wash. "Vellum" finish is slightly "toothy" and works best for watercolor and acrylics.

Most art stores carry 300 series and I've only found one place that regularly carries 400. I've yet to find 1 store that does not require you to place a special order for the 500 board.

Justice41
06-18-2006, 05:22 PM
Michael's usually carries it. The difference between em? the 500 series is two sheets of Bristol pasted together so both sides are the good side. There is also a thin sheet of cardboard between the sheets of bristol. This was Strathmore's answer to Illustration boards.So in reality you could make your own 500 series by pasting two 400 together or onto a thin sheet of poster board.