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View Full Version : Keeping your pencils clean.


Jaknife
08-30-2005, 11:21 PM
When I draw, my art gets all smudged up.

how does everyone clean their scans? you know, getting rid of pencil smudges, unwanted lines, etc.

Rotin
08-30-2005, 11:48 PM
Usually I just go into photoshop, and adjust the brightness and contrast, ..or you can also clean them up by adjusting the output levels..or a combination of them both...

GW.Fisher
08-31-2005, 06:43 AM
It's called a kneaded eraser... :w00t:

Jaknife
08-31-2005, 01:37 PM
my lines are too close together to use an eraser.

dano
08-31-2005, 01:54 PM
:huh: care to explain that? Ive never met a line yet that didnt surrender to kneaded or its heavy weight, vinyl eraser.

Jaknife
08-31-2005, 02:28 PM
i mean, its hard ot get bewteen the lines i want and erase the smudges without erasing the good lines as wel.

dano
08-31-2005, 02:32 PM
Pencil smudges and pencil lines should all be cleaned/erased prior to scanning. Are you scanning pencil art in or inked art?

Pencil art is fine with extra lines or smudges; its part of the creative process. Unless you're planning to scan pencils and darken it to simulate inks???

Jaknife
08-31-2005, 02:33 PM
i scan pencils, and i only darke in hopes that it will look better, not necessarily to look like inks.

dano
08-31-2005, 02:40 PM
Get a pink or Vinyl eraser and cut a chunk off. the cut edge of rubber should be able to get inbetween lines like you mentioned.

Outside of that, I'd suggest getting harder pencils. Try a 2H for rough sketching and when you know what lines you want use a 2B to define them. The 2H will have a lighter line and if you dont press hard drawing with it it should erase easily. Or fade away when you adjust the brightnes/contrast as Rotin mentioned.

Jaknife
08-31-2005, 06:06 PM
when i draw, the side of my drawing hand gets covered in pencil from moving around the paper. if i could get rid of that prob, my pics would look much cleaner.

dano
08-31-2005, 06:08 PM
harder lead pencil and after you sketch it out loosely, start tightening it from the left to right (or opposite if left handed). A 2B which is what most standard pencils are, is a relatively soft lead and will smear.
I usually dont go below an HB for comics work. The 2H is even harder = less smearing

brawnlaw
08-31-2005, 07:20 PM
I've used an F lead from time to time ( I prefer the HB ), which is sort of in between the 2H and HB. The 2H was just too hard for my tastes, and the F lead provided a workable compromise when I was first learning to draw years ago. - Worked great as I was learning learn to lighten up and, as a result, keep things cleaner.

If your hand smears the pencil too much you can try: (A) Using a drafting pencil / lead holder. You may be doing that already--- I found that when I switched from the standard wood-clench pencil to a lead holder, the smearing was very much less. I really don't know why--- (B) Putting a sheet of typewriter paper under your hand, just back of the area in which you're drawing. Just make sure that as you use it, be careful not to drag it across the page with the side of your hand. Pick it up and move it. (C) Animator's cotton gloves. I've tried those myself and found them next to useless, but that's probably a personal thing. They guy(s) who've recommended 'em, swore by 'em, so they may work for you as well.

The comments above about the kneaded eraser are good, but I'd recommend a plastic or drafting stick eraser too. The Pentel Click Eraser is a great one in my view. And every once in a while, clean the edges / gutters and white areas of your work as you go along. Doing so can be tedious but if you're looking to get things cleaner---

Hope this helps.

jkyle74
09-09-2005, 07:12 PM
Ok here's the question? I'd like artists to comment on what they find is the best way to keep a comic page clean while penciling. HIT ME DAMMIT!!!!!

jkyle74
09-09-2005, 07:55 PM
so basically you dont worry too much about smudging up the page?

brawnlaw
09-09-2005, 08:30 PM
Well, not really, but like anything else, take as many steps as you can to keep your page clean on all levels. I usually clean it up in the computer, but I try to develop good work habits too in terms of erasing, using a piece of typewriter paper under my hand, and so on.

Even though this is the "digital age", it doesn't hurt to make a clean, crisp original either. Makes for a better scan, and, if you become Mr. / Ms. Superstar, helps create an original that is that much more saleable.

jkyle74
09-09-2005, 08:44 PM
Yea im using the paper under the hand trick i was just wondering if there was a better way

MadCow Menu
09-10-2005, 08:59 AM
Merged threads and posted a poll.

Michael Fraley
09-12-2005, 02:05 PM
This is where being left handed and working from left to right as well as inking left to right comes in handy. Of course, in my Sherpa strip I'm only working with one tier of panels, which simplifies things. When working across and down as on a standard comic page, I usually resort to the printer paper under the hand bit.

As others have noted, it also helps to have a pencil hard enough not to smear too badly.

On the other hand, remember the old story about Jim Starlin rubbing his art with a sock so that it would make his editor think that he'd worked harder on his drawings? You never know ...

bluelinesmoke
09-12-2005, 05:14 PM
My absolute favorite tool is my electic eraser. It lets me erase exactly the lines that I need to without dusturbing the lines I want to keep. Beyond that I use the paper under the hand trick, though I usually use one of the cardboard sleeves that free AOL cds come in.

mister war
09-14-2005, 01:41 PM
I use a plain piece of paper under my hand, I work left to right, I use a kneaded eraser and a hard lead that never smears. This should be a multiple answer poll.

What I really want to know is how do you keep pencils from smudging if you're using your ruler a lot (especially when using a vanishing point- all that constant back and forth...)?

dano
09-14-2005, 01:43 PM
harder lead/graphite. 2H

mister war
09-14-2005, 01:43 PM
My absolute favorite tool is my electic eraser. It lets me erase exactly the lines that I need to without dusturbing the lines I want to keep. Beyond that I use the paper under the hand trick, though I usually use one of the cardboard sleeves that free AOL cds come in.

I was looking into electric erasers and those things are expensive. Do you really need it? I mean, is it worth the $100 price tag or could you do the same job with a plain ol' white eraser?

Wayne Drake
09-14-2005, 04:56 PM
It's called a kneaded eraser... :w00t:

HOLLA!!!!

brawnlaw
09-14-2005, 05:25 PM
mister war wrote:

What I really want to know is how do you keep pencils from smudging if you're using your ruler a lot (especially when using a vanishing point- all that constant back and forth...)?

I've found that running a strip of masking tape along one side works well, MW. And then of course, as the tape begins to gather graphite / gets dirty, you can peel off the old strip and stick on a new one ( Depending on how long you leave the first piece on, and whether or not it's good quality tape, removing the old strip can sometimes leave a little glue behind. No problem - lighter fluid or rubber cement thinner will take that off with no trouble ).

dano
09-14-2005, 05:34 PM
Sketch out very lightly what the image is.
you can get a very thin clear plastic ruler, like a pica ruler, put the corner of it on you perspective dot. Put your finger on the spot to hold the ruler corner in place. Now you can rotate the ruler using the corner as a pivot point and draw all of your lines in one sweeping direction. It minimalizes going over and over the drawing. Do this for each perspective point.

I also have a set of parallel rulers for making..uh, parallel lines quickly. Work in one direction. Also, very little motion to smudge the lines.

mister war
09-15-2005, 01:25 AM
mister war wrote:

What I really want to know is how do you keep pencils from smudging if you're using your ruler a lot (especially when using a vanishing point- all that constant back and forth...)?

I've found that running a strip of masking tape along one side works well, MW. And then of course, as the tape begins to gather graphite / gets dirty, you can peel off the old strip and stick on a new one ( Depending on how long you leave the first piece on, and whether or not it's good quality tape, removing the old strip can sometimes leave a little glue behind. No problem - lighter fluid or rubber cement thinner will take that off with no trouble ).

So you're saying that applying a piece of tape along the side of the artboard reduces the amount of smudging? :confused: I don't get it.

jkyle74
09-15-2005, 01:42 AM
Tape on the ruler edge i think he means , which could be a very good idea

mister war
09-15-2005, 01:44 AM
Tape on the ruler edge i think he means , which could be a very good idea

ah. yes. That would make more sense. :)

bluelinesmoke
09-15-2005, 05:01 AM
"Do you really need it? I mean, is it worth the $100 price tag or could you do the same job with a plain ol' white eraser?"

In my opinion, it's worth it. The reason I dont like plain ol' whites is that you have to rub with them which means you have to have room to rub. With the electric you just touch the page. I dont know if that makes sense or not but you just get better control. I still use white erasers, and kneaded erasers and pink pearls, but for different reasons. If you can get the results that you want without spending the cash then do what works for you, but I have definately gotten my moneys worth out of mine.

WSCrowson
10-06-2005, 11:04 AM
I use all of the above with the exception of digital. I have nothing against digital, just have never tried it. The glove helps out but can get sweaty.
I also love my Bruning electric eraser, it's an older one that my wife picked up at a flea market for $4.99. Love my wife. I also use an eraser guard which is great even if they bend a little too easily. They are cheap too.

BTW I voted for the "It's the inkers problem"

marco pedrana
10-06-2005, 12:33 PM
i usually draw pages on 2/4B and some H, lightboxing the sketches, so the finites aren't too messy. if they are, i just simply clean some grays on pc side. if i ink myself, i let myself be rough and state more darker tones, and when inked, i use a kneaded eraser to clean it up.

webcomicfan
10-06-2005, 07:53 PM
Ok, I haven't read everyone's response to this thread so this has probably already been mentioned.

Initially, I use a hard pencil to sketch out the forms then I take the kneaded eraser and lightly erase everything to a faint outline (I do this several times in the process). I flesh out more detail and go over it again with the eraser. (I also use a plain white paper to protect the pencils from palm smudges. Lastly, I use a F or HB to finalize the pencils.

Calloway
10-07-2005, 06:24 PM
i mean, its hard ot get bewteen the lines i want and erase the smudges without erasing the good lines as wel.

If their that close you should try drawing bigger.

paime77
10-07-2005, 07:00 PM
You can use an eraser guide to erase only the lines you want, and usually the "sharp" edge of the eraser helps get between lines as well.

Justice41
10-08-2005, 03:07 AM
Here's my Process unless I'm inking the art. I sketch with a soft pencil, Once It's down I go over it with a slightly harder lead then take a kneaded eraser and erase the entire drawing leaving only a ghost image enough so it's there but all the soft lead is gone. Then back on with HB or F lead with a lead holder. For some reason the lead for the lead holders is a bit more solid and doesn't break or shave as easily.
If yoou don't want to waste paper by using it under your hand then make a hand bridge. Just buy a wood ruler and glue or staple two quarter inch high wood blocks or cardboard on each end. Make sure it's a full size ruler. This way you can rest your hand on it instead of the paper. No smudges, no clean up. This is what it should look like, just not as high off the paper.
http://architectural-illustrations.com/images/hand.jpg

Justice41
10-08-2005, 03:09 AM
If the ruler isn't wide enough you know what to do, hit Loews, they have all kinds of craft wood that would be perfect.

WSCrowson
10-08-2005, 01:59 PM
Wow, first time I've seen or heard of a "hand bridge" gotta try that.
Thanks Justice41

sgm
10-08-2005, 06:32 PM
For straight and clean pencil lines I use a plastic Staedtler ruler with two bevelled edges. It's # code is 562 02-12. You can use it with either side down (metric, or imperial), because 1 edge always sits above the page. I place a sheet of paper under the part of the ruler that does touch the page, because without it the plastic picks up graphite and eraser bits and smears them into the page.

Then I draw all my straight lines with a 0.5mm tech pencil. The metal guard that the graphite comes out of rests on the ruler edge and not the graphite. That way the graphite doesn't rub the ruler, so no extra graphite dust adds to my already messy pages ;)

When thinkening those lines I do the same thing, but use those heavy drafting pencils with a B lead. I only do this at the end to give it more "punch".

Justice41
10-08-2005, 07:01 PM
Remember to always clean your triangles and rulers with alcohol and windex after every use. I use a 6 foot long pieces of 3 inch wide and 1/8th inch thick plexiglass for the far vanishing point, and a 3 foot long one for the closer vanishing points. My table is a door on a pair of drafting table legs. The door is 7 ft long. Do not put tape under your fuler or whatever you use for drawing VP lines. That's the best way to smear your art real good. There's nothing wrong with using pushpins for VP's when your done just flip the paper and rub the hole and it will close back up.
They used to make something called a scum bag, it was used to get up graphite shavings and dust. It's similiar to a rosen bag in baseball.
But as I said before, If I'm inking the art myself I just don't worry about the smudges.
Reasons to not use paper under the palm is, paper has tooth and will still smear and smudge pencils.

Cap
10-09-2005, 12:19 AM
I just use tissue or a napkin under my hand, it doesn't smudge, and I can use it as brush also to brush away any residue from my Epure eraser.

Scott Story
10-09-2005, 12:32 AM
I like the hand bridge idea. It reminds me of the "moll stick" for oil painting, which does pretty much the same thing and keeps your hand from smearing the paint.

I draw pretty lightly, so to be honest my page doesn't get very smudgy or dirty. I like 4H lead, though, so that may have something to do with it.

It's not an issue with good bristol board (smooth), I've noticed, but a lot of sketch books are made of some inferior paper that hold moisture and smudge a lot. I try to avoid said sketch books.

ChrisMcJunkin
10-09-2005, 11:36 AM
I've been using blue line pencils as of late (over the last three or four weeks) and then knocking out the blue. Below is a sample of how I go about doing this. Granted this doesn't work for something that you are planning not to ink and it doesn't help the actual original drawing to look all fancy but, for me, it makes the art I have on the computer look a lot cleaner. Also won't work if you're working with ink washes or various tones, only for straight black ink.

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a195/ChrisMcJ25/sample.jpg

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a195/ChrisMcJ25/subsample.jpg

Oh yeah, almost forgot. Once I've done all that, I convert the image to grayscale because it'll cut the file size down considerably once it doesn't have to read all those colors.

Hope that's helpful.

Chris McJunkin

Justice41
10-09-2005, 05:33 PM
You could change the color scan into a bitmap and set the tolerance to 50/50 % which will turn all on the page either black or white. You have to scan the image in at 600 dpi grayscale or color then convert to grey then to bitmap.

Scott Story
10-09-2005, 09:05 PM
Justice 41 beat me to it. Save yourself a bunch of work by scanning the work as 600 dpi linart or bitmap, then convert to grayscale once scanned. All the blue goes away, and you get tight, pure b&w. Saves mucho time.

Xero
11-01-2005, 04:55 AM
I just use a piece of paper under my hand when i draw. I also use an electric eraser and a kneeded one. I think digitally cleaning up the smudges is kind of a cop out in the sense that " my drawing is a bit sloppy, but the computer will clean it up". Kinda weak to me... :sure:

BobRivard
02-14-2007, 07:54 AM
Bah, you digital haters. :yawn:

To keep my pages clean, I used to just do my layouts on 11x17 sketch paper with 2H or HB lead (whatever you're comfortable with). Then I'd quickly ink over it, tightening it up a bit and defining the shapes. Nothing detailed, just the basics. After that, I'd take a nice piece of 11x17 bristol board and put that over the layout I just completed on the crappy paper. Take it to the lightbox (forget how much those cost now) and lightly trace my layout onto the bristol board with a 2H pencil. Inking the layout on the sketch paper also makes the lines much easier to read through the thicker bristol board.

Once I had that clean layout down on the bristol board, I'd lightly erase the entire page with a kneaded eraser so there was only a faint image left. I'd basically use that as my under-drawing and start doing finished pencils at this point.

I hated doing things that way. Drawing on a lightbox isn't exactly fun for the eyes and you're sort of drawing the page twice, which can help you lose interest in a hurry. It's time consuming and quite a production, so I don't work that way anymore.

Continued...

BobRivard
02-14-2007, 07:55 AM
The way I do it now is with the help of a computer (ooh!) and full size printer. The computer doesn't clean things up for me... I learned how to use photoshop to help me out in keeping a clean page, just like I learned how to use a pencil and eraser to draw a page.

The way this goes, is I lay out my page on an 8.5x11 piece of printer paper. I have comic book page templates printed out to scale on these pages so the dimensions translate to the full size board (and print). Some people might find it difficult to draw a page of sequentials on an 8.5x11 piece of paper, especially smaller panels with detail. Well you shouldn't be drawing details at this point. Consider this small piece of paper your "gesture" for the page. I have a hard time getting nice gestures and action down on a large piece of board anyhow. The small size is also helpful with perspective. You don't need to set your vanishing points 3 or 4 feet off the edge of your page. You only need a foot or two with this size.

So I have my 8.5x11 comic book page roughed out at this point. Now I'll quickly ink over it, like I did when I was lightboxing, but this time I use a finer pen since I'm working smaller. Then I erase all the pencil on the page. I'll take that, scan it into Photoshop, blow it up to 11x17 and adjust levels quickly to get rid of any light pencil marks that my eraser may have missed. Then, I convert those black lines to very light blue ones... 30% Cyan.

Once that small bit of work is done in Photoshop, just a few minutes of work there, I'll print it out on a full size printer loaded with smooth 11x17 bristol board. Not everyone has one, but you can find them for around $250 - $300. For me, it was a worthwhile investment.

Now at this point, the page is ready to be finished. In some cases, you can ink at this stage if you're comfortable enough. Personally, I draw right over the printed page. Some guys will take it a step further and lightbox that printed page onto another board. Basically all that does is give you a completely original drawing with no printed ink on it. I avoid that since it's extra work and I'm not concerned about having light blue printer ink on my page. Comics is a commerical medium, and I figure anything goes, as long as it looks good and gets done on time.

If you have the equipment, this is a very nice way to go about doing a page. It takes little time, you don't have to worry about smudges, you can print out multiple pages for inking and penciling or do-overs. It's also nice if you find 11x17 pages a little harrowing. Most guys I know are accustomed to drawing at a smaller size in their sketch books or on napkins. Find ways to make the medium adapt to you, don't sacrifice your comfort or urge to try a new technique in the name of tradition or what people consider cheating... there's no such thing and there are no rules ;)

William Blankenship
02-19-2007, 08:11 PM
Paper under the hand. I'm left handed so I go right to left. Lightly apply workable fixatif as you go, not so much that changes can't be made. Things still smudge a bit but I usually clean that up in photoshop, or it's not enough that it can't be gotten rid of with replace color function. usually just fine tuning and slight cleanup in PS.

Hope this helps.

webcreed
03-12-2007, 04:40 PM
i use a dry cleaning padded eraser and a sheet of white paper myself

Mojo
03-12-2007, 05:21 PM
Its tough to have a paper clean. I use an electric eraserpen to go over both pencilled work and inked artwork (If the paper is suitable to erase ink) this keep both the scketchwork clean and also the inked pages clean.

OZ!
03-27-2007, 07:01 AM
Use a mechanical pencil, the lines are better, there is less sharpening and the only reason it would smudge would be sweaty fat hands and I lack both. I actually had a dude ask if I light boxed my work and at the time I had no clue what a lightbox was. I kinda figured it was something on photoshop. :) Anyhoo, the moral of the story is I don't smudge cause of the tools I use. You want good tips, ask Sneed how to keep from smudging since he uses Charcoal. Now there's a good trick.

Biofungus
03-27-2007, 07:59 AM
the only reason it would smudge would be sweaty fat hands

Wow, now if that ain't a sweeping generalization (not to mention a rather insulting one).

Smudges occur for many reasons, and about 99% of them have nothing to do with being fat, or sweaty.

And for the record, I've used charcoal too. It's actually easier to avoid smudging it than pencil.

OZ!
03-27-2007, 01:24 PM
Wow, now if that ain't a sweeping generalization (not to mention a rather insulting one).

Smudges occur for many reasons, and about 99% of them have nothing to do with being fat, or sweaty.

And for the record, I've used charcoal too. It's actually easier to avoid smudging it than pencil.


:laugh: Not the smudges I see at cons. :laugh: "Can you get me another soda? I'm dyin' here." :p Hey if you can work charcoal and get it to not smear then good for you, that's a hell of a skill, but it certainly ain't easier then pencils(my god what pencils are you using?!? :blink: ) Are you fat? It was more of a joke to all the fanboy artists that haven't ever walked past the fridge rather than a "this is the only reason and that's it! Forever!", type of thing. Oh well, it might just be funny to me. :rolleyes:

omega sentry
03-27-2007, 02:53 PM
I like things dirty, like my women thank you.... :laugh:


Oh wait wrong topic... :happy:

Biofungus
03-27-2007, 03:40 PM
:laugh: Not the smudges I see at cons. :laugh: "Can you get me another soda? I'm dyin' here." :p Hey if you can work charcoal and get it to not smear then good for you, that's a hell of a skill, but it certainly ain't easier then pencils(my god what pencils are you using?!? :blink: ) Are you fat? It was more of a joke to all the fanboy artists that haven't ever walked past the fridge rather than a "this is the only reason and that's it! Forever!", type of thing. Oh well, it might just be funny to me. :rolleyes:
I normally use a 3h, which is fine and doesn't smudge (at least not noticably). But sometimes, for whatever reason I have to use a darker lead (like an F or even HB) and those always seem to smudge. Charcoal isn't THAT hard, unless you're all over the page. If you work fairly evenly from left to right (or right to left if you're a south paw), there's no real problem.

And for the record, yes, I am rather ruben-esque. So :nyah:

OZ!
03-27-2007, 04:14 PM
I normally use a 3h, which is fine and doesn't smudge (at least not noticably). But sometimes, for whatever reason I have to use a darker lead (like an F or even HB) and those always seem to smudge. Charcoal isn't THAT hard, unless you're all over the page. If you work fairly evenly from left to right (or right to left if you're a south paw), there's no real problem.

And for the record, yes, I am rather ruben-esque. So :nyah:

My charcoal tends to look like finger paints cause of all the damn prints. :laugh:

INFINITEDREAMS
03-31-2007, 02:44 AM
Oh you guys........ Just stick a freaking paper towel under your hands already! Did you all really need me to say that? :) :rolleyes:

Biofungus
03-31-2007, 08:56 AM
Oh you guys........ Just stick a freaking paper towel under your hands already! Did you all really need me to say that? :) :rolleyes:
It's already been said (that or paper) like 23 times in this thread. However, it still depends on the paper you're drawing on, and what lead you're using. I had some hb lead smear on me a few weeks ago, despite keeping paper under my hand. So it's not a simple end all be all.

INFINITEDREAMS
03-31-2007, 09:48 PM
Really? I saw paper being used over and over, but I mean like bounty, from the kitchen:) 2 ply even, it doesnt drag like a sheet of copy paper. but if thats what was said I missed it:) I mean the quicker picker upper. But honestly why would anyone use hb to draw comics? thats wayy too soft for me anyway, thats the real problem.

NGoff
04-10-2007, 10:54 PM
There are many things involved that can cause/prevent smudging. Many have been mentioned and many can be applied to different people depending on preference and other factors involved...yadda yadda yadda.

You can take many of these factors and make an equation out of them and thus limit smudging....many equations...BUT you've got to combined your own set of factors to what works for you.

SO...I'll just throw in some more that I don't think have been mentioned...if they have...oops.

The retractable eraser sticks work well for tight spots...I know of the regular and small ones. The smaller one (http://www.shop.com/op/aprod-p48688446-k24-g1-nover-~Tuff+Stuff+Eraser+Stick%22) is the same thickness as the electric, but it's not electric. It's my best friend. Use a duster (http://www.dickblick.com/itemgroups-d/dusters/) to brush off eraser residue or whatever...your hand can smudge the pencils. And blowing on it can cause spit splatter.

Paper (Biofungus mentions...a little). Vellum or smooth? I've tested out both MANY times...even 3 ply and 4 ply. Plys didn't make much difference with the pencils (helped with inks in relation to buckle)...but smooth worked best for me. The pencils (2H 5.0 mechanical-I mostly use-but I'm not much of a penciller stage) erased easier and the surface was perfect for my fine 0 brush/ink work.

A heavy hand can make a difference. Or if you have a death grip...such things may cause you to draw darker or dig into the paper. Thus, making it harder to erase. That's when different lead types can help. Try relaxing your grip every time you notice. Step away...flex those joints out. I'm a tight gripper.

I personally use a glove (cut thumb, first/second finger off for grip) because I get clamy hands. It also helps the hand 'glide' over the paper...works well for inking a smooth line! Although I've used the 'paper under the hand', I now actually tape (painters blue tape-medium tack) it down to cover the panels I'm not working on (when doing seqentials). It also helps me focus on just the one panel without dreading the other unfinished ones.

That's pretty much how I handle it...but then again....I do my roughs about 2X3 inches then blow them up. I then lightly rough (from light box) the layouts on the final paper....minimizing a lot of rework in the beginning stages. Then it's all up to the factors involved! :p


-Nicole =)

Gav Heryng
04-22-2007, 09:49 PM
I couldn't afford a glove, so I cut finger holes in some old socks.

Good as.

Dis

Kody
04-23-2007, 02:37 AM
Who says pencils have to be clean? :D


Mine are quite sloppy and smudges are par for the course. But then, I ink my own stuff, so I don't stress over it. It all goes away when I pull out the eraser.

JaySavage
05-07-2007, 02:50 AM
my lines are too close together to use an eraser.

Buy an eraser shield $.50

Thunder Rat
05-17-2007, 05:10 AM
I think it's better to use a kneaded eraser and avoid using a regular one as much as possible. After a while, if you keep erasing the same area, it becomes really messy and trying to erase it won't make it go away.

compton
06-11-2007, 07:45 AM
I use a sweet arm band that says dork on it. works like a charm

FatBoy73
06-15-2007, 09:43 PM
I know alot of profesional animators and pencilers alike use a non photo blue pencile to lay out their roughs and then go over with a regular pencil.
It saves you alot of work because the non photo blue doesn't show up in a scan.

jaxel
06-17-2007, 07:13 PM
I use an electric eraser. It's unbelievable.