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kevinharte36
04-11-2017, 06:18 PM
Got these samples together. Feedback/criticism welcomed!

http://i64.tinypic.com/2di0sr7.jpg
http://i66.tinypic.com/3582qyv.jpg
http://i65.tinypic.com/21kkmtw.jpg
http://i66.tinypic.com/qmxlcz.jpg
http://i63.tinypic.com/a9siyq.jpg
http://i63.tinypic.com/20qgkmo.jpg
http://i65.tinypic.com/4l3ih3.jpg
http://i63.tinypic.com/2u6h6kp.jpg
http://i68.tinypic.com/23svp5c.jpg

kevinharte36
04-11-2017, 06:18 PM
http://i65.tinypic.com/2hdxwti.jpg
http://i66.tinypic.com/qzomcm.jpg
http://i65.tinypic.com/33e5xq8.jpg
http://i67.tinypic.com/2lver8z.jpg
http://i68.tinypic.com/6yl7yh.jpg
http://i63.tinypic.com/1247vur.jpg
http://i63.tinypic.com/bf2cys.jpg
http://i67.tinypic.com/2uiiqz6.jpg
http://i65.tinypic.com/2hrnxh0.jpg

kevinharte36
04-11-2017, 06:19 PM
http://i65.tinypic.com/307wwb9.jpg
http://i65.tinypic.com/oj068g.jpg[/img]

gizroc2
04-18-2017, 01:18 PM
It's very ambitious and well done. It's just a matter of time and practice. Don't be afraid to check out some reference, or a program like Poser or DAZ Studio to help with figures. Good stuff here!

kevinharte36
04-18-2017, 04:42 PM
Thanks

kevinharte36
05-17-2017, 12:14 PM
..

kevinharte36
06-22-2017, 03:57 PM
No feedback. Newer samples coming anyway:)

sevans
06-22-2017, 07:27 PM
Feedback.
Proportions and bone structure.
Some of your figure work has a bendy almost play duh feel to their anatomy, like they have rubber bones.
And some of the figures proportions change from panel to panel, especially in their arms and forearms. Consistancy.

Still, a lot of work, more than me lately.
Well done, keep going.

kevinharte36
06-23-2017, 09:54 AM
Thanks! I did a couple of online courses since then, life drawing at Art mentors and painting 101 at artclasses.com. Have improved alot.

Saw your website, very nice.

MattTriano
06-23-2017, 04:02 PM
Thanks! I did a couple of online courses since then, life drawing at Art mentors and painting 101 at artclasses.com. Have improved alot.

Saw your website, very nice.

Check out Youtube there are a lot of great resources for movement and gesture and pose, in particular the New Masters Academy and Art Mentors channels. Click around Vimeo.com too. Check out Posespace.com for amazing multi-angle stillframe model images.

For inanimate reference, you may like a fantastic 3D site called sketchfab.com. I'd also recommend learning the basics in Sketchup, a desktop 3D program for building and assembling models. I find it invaluable and am consistently impressed with the art and design on offer via incredible free models that users construct for fun; one can download, disassemble, and reconstruct for ones own purpose (so long as the models you assemble and use in your work are significantly different from the models you've downloaded).

Keep going! Post more.

kevinharte36
06-23-2017, 05:30 PM
Thanks. On those pages I modeled all the characters in Blender from scratch and posed them for renders.I tried to keep a strict deadline. I lightly lightboxed all the panels together trying to losen things up. The play dough result probably is because I relied to heavily on the models, not being confident enough I guess.

Other work, needs updating...

www.kevinharte.ml

MattTriano
06-23-2017, 10:50 PM
Thanks. On those pages I modeled all the characters in Blender from scratch and posed them for renders.I tried to keep a strict deadline. I lightly lightboxed all the panels together trying to losen things up. The play dough result probably is because I relied to heavily on the models, not being confident enough I guess.

Other work, needs updating...

www.kevinharte.ml

I think you're right. Worry less about deadlines right now; it isn't always a matter of reference but instead how you process that ref into a drawing. Modeling the characters in Blendr is cool but people aren't Blendr models, their gesture movement and weight isn't going to be accurate unless you understand those things. Much easier to take photos of yourself doing the things you need to be done -- use a mirror or a timer app on your phone -- along with the objective ref you can gather online to better understand how people move and things go together.

Neil Allen
06-24-2017, 12:00 AM
Looking at this current posted art, it looks like you have a real good sense on how to stage shots. Your camera angles are good, and how you position the characters in the panels is good. That said, it seems like realizing the ideas could use some work. For example, the hand in the second panel on this page is really underdeveloped and odd looking:

http://i63.tinypic.com/a9siyq.jpg

I would say work on your hands if you haven't strengthened that area already. Draw hands over and over and over and over and over and over again until you're really confident in how to represent them well.

Also, try to get a good sense for how large body parts are in relation to other body parts. For example, if you look here:

http://i67.tinypic.com/2uiiqz6.jpg

The woman standing on the left has a hand that's near as large as her head. If you spread your hand out and press it to your face starting at your chin, it will likely come up to around the top of your eyes. Of course, there is variance, but some things generally apply. And yeah, small heads are pretty common in super hero art, but it's usually easy to tell if the artist means that or not, and to me, here, it doesn't seem intentional. It looks like the woman has a head that's too small for her body.

So yeah, I'd recommend just working on basic things like anatomy, but the good news is it looks like you really know how to structure events of a story in comic form well and you have a number of other things down pretty well.

kevinharte36
06-24-2017, 04:29 PM
Thanks.

kevinharte36
06-26-2017, 01:52 PM
More recent sample, just done it today.

Pg.1 Judge Dredd: Cycle of violence.

http://i67.tinypic.com/nxnx4i.jpg

kevinharte36
06-27-2017, 04:51 PM
Pg.2 Judge Dredd: Cycle of violence.
http://i64.tinypic.com/2i9gy6f.png

kevinharte36
07-03-2017, 05:39 PM
Aiming to do 100 pages eventually.

http://i67.tinypic.com/14ddau9.png

http://i66.tinypic.com/2ujmi5j.png

kevinharte36
07-05-2017, 04:04 PM
http://i65.tinypic.com/264l0mp.png

kevinharte36
07-08-2017, 06:53 PM
http://i64.tinypic.com/25k3f4i.png
website: www.kevinharte.ml

kevinharte36
07-13-2017, 04:32 PM
Nightwing Pages. Pg.1

http://i63.tinypic.com/htvk44.png

sevans
07-13-2017, 06:46 PM
Figure work is abit stiff, and the poses don't feel natural.
Good to see a lot of work being done though, great way to improve.

Little things like Dredd's badge moving places on his uniform too. Keep it consistant.

kevinharte36
07-14-2017, 07:38 AM
Thanks. Find it's better to just be productive than to sit back and think and study all the time :)

sevans
07-14-2017, 07:51 PM
I need to take that advice.

Charles
07-17-2017, 09:23 PM
Got these samples together. Feedback/criticism welcomed!

In a nutshell, there's a huge amount of room for improvement across a wide range of different panels. That said, your work shows a lot of promise. There's actually some good stuff on display here, but it is outweighed by a lot of mediocrity.

You're not a terrible artist, not by a long shot. Sure, you're not a master of human anatomy, but you're probably farther along down that path than you realize. What's killing your work, right now, is your God-awful penchant for opting for stiff poses, rather than poses that embody the limber and motion states of the human figure.

You play with panels. You sure do love squares and rectangles, but you're experimenting, and it's starting to show. Right now, your panels are keeping you - the artist - in boxes. Why? Think outside the box - literally! Also, the human eye is quite capable of appreciating a vastly greater array of geometric shapes and angles than what you have chosen to go with in the two pages of sequential pages on display here in this thread, so far.

Plus, you're doing sequentials, That is bread and butter, not damned pin-ups. Sequentials are not just pin-ups in miniature. They feature sequence - hence, the name, sequentials. Sequences of scenes in a story. One can be a great pin-up artist, yet remain terrible at the art of story telling in a visual manner. Sequentials will force you to challenge yourself more than pin-ups will. They also increase your ability across a range of different artistic skills in ways that sticking with pin-up art won't.

Right now, you are missing the forest for the trees. By that, I mean that your individual panels in the sub-set of art that you have populated this thread with, thus far, pander to the simple. Simple visuals. Yet, some of your individual panels hint at far greater talent that is simply being withheld from the viewer. Simple panels are quicker to do, certainly - but at what cost to you, and more importantly, at what cost to your art?

You are better at depicting human expressions than at the range of human movement as expressed in human anatomy in motion. Of the two of them, the ability to depict expressions is of greater criticality than the ability to draw human anatomy with perfection. Granted, that is my opinion of one, but it is my opinion, nonetheless.

Similarly, being able to draw human anatomy, per se, is secondary in importance to being able to pose the figures that you are drawing, whether they be anatomically correct or not. Why? Because your characters in sequentials are figures on stage, so to speak. Being able to pose figures in various sequences of a fight, for example, as in a battle between a superhero and a super villain, are instrumental to telling a story successfully than drawing picture perfect human figures that don't know how to move, and in effect, become the visual equivalent of mannequins.

In real life, most human beings are not exquisite examples of human physiques. Yet, most all of us have a certain fluidity to our movement. Our emotions help invest us in things, and they help us to convey our stories to others. Artists spend so much time trying to master perfection, yet it is imperfection - the imperfection of life and of human beings and of the world around us - that is taken for granted. And so we end up with so many characters in comic books that look like hardly anybody that we know.

A thunderstorm has come up, here, so I am going to go ahead and post this portion of feedback, in case lightning knocks the power out.

Sorry!

Charles
07-17-2017, 09:38 PM
http://i65.tinypic.com/21kkmtw.jpg

Look at Panel #1 on this page of sequentials. You spend all of that time drawing all of those bodies and standing figures, and you even treat the viewer to a variety of battered vehicles and some architectural details of a building. There's been one heck of a fight, obviously - but not a damned bit of debris lies anywhere in sight. How is that even possible?

Yet, it is the debris that makes or breaks aftermath scenes of battles and other destructive events. Your aftermath scene is squeaky clean. Why?

And on this page of sequentials, why do lean so heavily to standing poses? The girl floating in the air. She has a pose very similar (read that as, visually equivalent to) a standing pose. And why are those women standing on those cars. Not sitting, not crouching, not anything but standing. It looks somewhat bizarre, visually out of place, something is not quite visually kosher with that to the human eye. That's a good example of how to create visual distractions, and that's not a compliment.

Charles
07-17-2017, 09:56 PM
http://i66.tinypic.com/qmxlcz.jpg


OK, here the viewer is treated down to some bare bones boring panel work, a couple of rectangles on the page, but the top panel on this page immediately grabs the eye. Why? Because she has visual presence by a combination of her powers on display, her facial expression, and by the reactions of the two characters facing her (one through a raised arm and the other through a facial expression of her on. The scene has some visual energy in it. Something is going on. What you've visually communicated to the viewer is that something big has just transpired. It can't be a good sign, if some kind of devil woman suddenly appears surrounded by flames.


http://i63.tinypic.com/20qgkmo.jpg

Now, look at this page, top panel.

More standing poses. Is that supposed to be the same girl moving across the room? If so, then because there's no real special effects to highlight and to visually depict movement apart from poses, the eye isn't entirely sure. The consequence of this is that the large panel ends up feeling visually stiff.

Yet, in the next panel down (Another two panel page - Oh, boy!), you utilize special effects to make the pig more visually interesting than a bunch of characters in the panel above. The pig has some visual life in it, at least.



http://i68.tinypic.com/23svp5c.jpg

Once again, turn your attention to the top panel of this page. The girl who is kneeling on one knee, her pose and her expression match the action behind her. And once again, you treat the viewer to a standing pose in that other character behind. The girl's anatomy is problematic (her left leg looks especially painful), but the pose, itself, is good. It visually connects with the eye.

Down in the bottom panel, the girl running has an exaggerated running stance, which I actually like. Her proportions, anatomically, are out of balance, but I like very much the fact that she is running - seriously running, at that. It imbues your scene with a sense of visual urgency.

Not sure if any of this is helpful to you.

kevinharte36
07-18-2017, 05:01 PM
Thanks! Very helpful. I bought this book http://ryanwoodwardart.com/store/, should help alot with what your saying. I've enrolled in a tutoring program for 3d maya animation, so the fact that I can draw somewhat might help as alot of 3d people don't bother learning to draw :)

Charles
07-18-2017, 07:00 PM
Thanks! Very helpful. I bought this book http://ryanwoodwardart.com/store/, should help alot with what your saying. I've enrolled in a tutoring program for 3d maya animation, so the fact that I can draw somewhat might help as alot of 3d people don't bother learning to draw :)

I think that it is safe to say that you are able to draw substantially more than somewhat.

Good luck with it all!