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View Full Version : Well, I Think This Articulates Things Better Than I Can


Buckyrig
08-09-2016, 07:20 PM
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Ingrid K. V. Hardy
08-10-2016, 01:54 PM
Not sure I understand why he calls it "weaponized" but I completely agree that when done properly, intertextuality can be really fun and interesting. Overdone and it's not just silly, but negative.

Moonrider
08-11-2016, 10:42 PM
I think the youtuber should have also mentioned those horrible parody movies like Date Movie, Disaster Movie, Meet The Spartans, etc. If this 'intertextuality' thing is an actual word and an actual thing, then look no further to the movies that pretty much abuses it to its maximum capabilities. In fact, intertextuality may even be born and bred from the parody genre. If you look closely on Ghostbusters 2, it's basically the same movie as the first Ghostbusters. But the intertextuality is hardly apparent unless you pick apart all the plot beats one by one. I don't remember much of The Saint's original show but none of the scenes in the Val Kilmer version seem to be specifically hinting at something from the TV series. Now you look at sequels and reboot movies post-Scary Movie, like say the new female Ghostbusters, some of the scenes we see borders between homages and parodies.

Luke Noonan
08-14-2016, 02:23 PM
I like film theory, and I look at things critically too, but that whole video seems like a totally pointless over-analysis of an obvious observation with an absurdly cynical and dramatic name for it in 'intertextual weaponization.' Weaponization? Seriously?
I too find the overuse of teaser symbols and motifs in film and TV as 'tributes', in-jokes and shout-outs pretty tiresome, especially when it's used as overly dramatic foreshadowing in the film itself, eg in the Spectre Blofeld scene where he reveals his name (and 'Khaaaan') without much reason for it being a reveal since it means nothing to the characters. Forehsadowing like that belongs generally in the marketing and trailers for the film, instead of being used as twists in the movie when we're already expecting it. Twists, meanwhile, should be saved for something of actual originality.
I agree with the BvS part that it was largely a Zack Snyder adaptation of TDKReturns and Death of Superman in the same vein as Watchmen, but Watchmen the comic (over)used "intertexual weaponization" in the form of repeated motifs and comic-history shoutouts all throughout its pages, years before most of the film examples given in the video above, in fact it does feel like weaponization with the way it hits you over the head with it, which is why (IMO) the pretty faithful film version worked in most ways as an adaptation but failed as a film purely on its own merits: it did the same thing.
If I can conclude anything from the video, it is simply that big studios are low on ideas and risk-taking but have found that teasers, tributes and dramatic use of them in foreshadowing is popular and effective and builds interest and therefor money. Also, that they can be used as creative filler or "twists" in the films themselves. Pretty obvious observation, IMO. So we'll see a lot of it, increasingly tiresomely, until feedback and numbers prove people have grown truly bored with it and another mass marketing trend comes along.

Buckyrig
08-15-2016, 12:20 PM
If I can conclude anything from the video, it is simply that big studios are low on ideas and risk-taking but have found that teasers, tributes and dramatic use of them in foreshadowing is popular and effective and builds interest and therefor money. Also, that they can be used as creative filler or "twists" in the films themselves. Pretty obvious observation, IMO.

And yet it works on plenty of people without their realization. Not recognizing this is essential to the belief that some hold that many of these movies are modern classics, and that people who don't quite feel the movies work or resonate are being cynical.

I don't know. Everyone has guilty pleasures, but somewhere along the line a good mass of people forced virtue into them.