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View Full Version : Wonder Woman (Colors) Artist ?????


ward1976
07-18-2016, 04:54 PM
https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/13686641_1715814491969575_8691507962201013639_n.jp g?oh=89e76e4c4135c100181ba9e40054ec8c&oe=582C1D27

TheDeeMan
07-19-2016, 12:26 AM
Nicely done.

Dee

SeanE
07-19-2016, 06:26 AM
How to make the lineart on a separate transparent layer... (in photoshop)

1. Make sure the picture is in RGB mode, with the picture flattened to one single layer
2. Go to the Channels dialogue box (its in the Layers dialogue box)
3. Copy the BLUE channel
4. Invert the copied blue channel (ctrl - i) so the balcks become white and the whites become black
5. Go back to your normal layers. Create a new transparent layer above the lineart
6. Fill the layer with the lineart in it with solid white
7. Make your transparent layer the active layer and go to SELECT - LOAD SELECTION. You'll see all the marching ants appear in the shape of your lineart
8. Fill this selection with solid black.

Ta-dahhhh! You now have your lineart on its own separate transparent layer and can now do your flats and shading underneath it without getting those stray white pixels around the edges of your lineart as you have here in the WW picture.

If you lock the lineart layer you can also paint directly onto it and do 'colour holds' to change the colour of your lineart such as toning down the intensity of the skintone outlines etc as I've done in that Pepper-beach picture I've posted recently.

same instructions with step by step pictures (for photoshop 5.0 but the steps are the same) ---> http://www.seanellery.com/tutorial/tutorial_cici.html

cheers
Sean

Bishop
07-19-2016, 08:44 AM
Or, for a much more basic approach, set your art layer to 'multiply'. This makes the white space transparent. Create a layer underneath and color on that.

This won't do for professional printing work, but for practice and web work it should be fine.

SeanE
07-19-2016, 11:23 AM
Or, for a much more basic approach, set your art layer to 'multiply'. This makes the white space transparent. Create a layer underneath and color on that.

This won't do for professional printing work, but for practice and web work it should be fine.

No. Setting it too multiply doesn't let you colour the lineart and does create those white pixels around the edges when you try to flatten the layers from time to time.

Do it my way.

ward1976
07-19-2016, 12:12 PM
I appreciate your advice gentlemen. Thank you.

MBirkhofer
07-20-2016, 08:30 AM
How to make the lineart on a separate transparent layer... (in photoshop)

If you lock the lineart layer you can also paint directly onto it and do 'colour holds' to change the colour of your lineart such as toning down the intensity of the skintone outlines etc as I've done in that Pepper-beach picture I've posted recently.


Coloring directly onto the lineart is old and busted as well.

Create a new layer over the lineart.
Select this new layer. Then grab the lineart layer, and drag it down to the "Add layer mask" box.
Unlink the mask. And now you can make selections and color on the layer. (not the layer mask)
Merge down when done. or select and remove the inks underneath for easier trapping if thats needed when moving to preprint.

this gives much more freedom. you can make gradients, erase, selections, hard edges, etc. works great for inks and pencils.

ward1976
07-21-2016, 03:58 PM
When I create a new layer over the lineart. is it a foreground, background, white or transparency?

MBirkhofer
07-22-2016, 10:12 AM
Transparency?

Bishop
07-22-2016, 10:54 AM
No. Setting it too multiply doesn't let you colour the lineart and does create those white pixels around the edges when you try to flatten the layers from time to time.

Do it my way.

Understood. I was just trying to give him a simpler/faster approach as he is just learning the basics of coloring, much less preparing something for press/production. You gave the pro answer. I gave the amateur answer. :p

Also, from my experience, multiply has never given me the white edges. That typically comes from coloring on the same layer as the line art using the magic lasso tool or something like that.

For the record: I use the method you described for my work when I color (which is seldom anymore)

SeanE
07-22-2016, 11:18 AM
Understood. I was just trying to give him a simpler/faster approach as he is just learning the basics of coloring, much less preparing something for press/production. You gave the pro answer. I gave the amateur answer. :p

Also, from my experience, multiply has never given me the white edges. That typically comes from coloring on the same layer as the line art using the magic lasso tool or something like that.

For the record: I use the method you described for my work when I color (which is seldom anymore)

okie dokie then