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juan.a.stewart
03-04-2016, 10:40 AM
Hello my fellow citizens of DW, it's your fellow member here. The cool dude, the nice guy, the one some people wanted to run for office here (yea, some folks suggested one time, funny ain't it). That annoying guy (What! Shame on you for thinking I am!). The Prince... of jibba, jabba (Give me a break, who else would call me that but me? It's cool isn't it?) Jaz. Do publishers (comic companies as I call them) still have tryouts? Just a question.

Sure, I'm pretty sure there's a few companies out there that still do this, maybe, I don't know I haven't inquired in years. But for those of you creating your own companies do you have this system? You see that's the point. Most publishers nowadays I believe have a system where you submit some kind of body of work that's not like the tryouts I knew existed (Marvel's). The Marvel tryouts I thought was the smartest thing, you come up with a portfolio showing your pencil skills, inking skill, writing skills, etc. and in my opinion it helped people concentrate on getting better to later get accepted, eventually. If this isn't the case anymore then let us know. That's why I brought this up.

This isn't something I'm interested in personally, if I want to work on some comics I'll just contact the kind folks here at DW and eventually work something out, but this isn't my point. Times are changing fast and I wondered how fast are they changing to the point that if someone was on the outside looking in, how would they go about wanting to get into comics? Are there tryouts? If not I think there should be. If you're an Indie Publisher, do you have tryouts? If not why not? What's your system for submitting something? Tryouts help people out more than you think.

It'll be good to know what the kind folks here have to say about this subject and interesting to know how things are today, where information is rapidly changing.

juan.a.stewart
03-04-2016, 11:34 AM
I've been trying to clarify this message to post this here since Wednesday but finally got the chance, so ya insights will be helpful thanks.

Stewart Vernon
03-05-2016, 02:06 AM
I think part of the problem with the tryout method is... well, the economy in general and especially the artist/writer market is really NOT an employee market.

What I mean to say is... there are a LOT of people who would like to write and draw, but only so many companies out there... so even if they are looking to hire, they know it is a buyer's market from their point of view.

So I think they get lazy... take the "you show me" and "you figure it out" approach, because they can... and because there are literally hundreds of thousands of us waiting to knock on their door.

IF there was a scarcity of people looking to do the work, then companies would be well-encouraged to do something to focus the talent pool... but until something changes in the job market, there's no incentive for them to do so.

Of course it means they will waste their time with some people and many of us will waste our time... but they aren't in any kind of urgency to find the next new talent right now, so all we can do in the meantime is hone our skills and self-publish as much as we can and try to make our own way through the minefield.

juan.a.stewart
03-05-2016, 10:00 AM
You know what Stewart, I'm starting to see what you're saying makes sense. I honestly never thought of that. I get asked "how do you get into comics" and from what I know from those who are in it, they knew so and so, gave so and so etc. But for the one who knows nothing about this, some might think you have to fill out an application. The tryouts was something I always viewed as encouraging, if you lived on Mars (exaggerated) it would be difficult for you to go to a convention and show your stuff tho'. Most people I socialize with would never think to go show their stuff there. In these times I feel technology has made things easy to communicate tho' but still how things are done today, is another thing. As for the self publishing thing, I think that has become the "tryouts" of today. So many people doing them.

IF there was a scarcity of people looking to do the work, then companies would be well-encouraged to do something to focus the talent pool... but until something changes in the job market, there's no incentive for them to do so.

What exactly you mean by this Stewart? Those competing should break the next man's legs so that there's only a few in order for things to change? I know what ya saying but every time I read this I think about you saying we should break some legs... at least (funny).

Stewart Vernon
03-05-2016, 03:04 PM
I don't know what can be done, frankly... there are a lot of professions that this affects, but just focusing on art/writing since that's what we talk about here...

If the industry expanded, produced more work because it had more customers buying product... that would create a need for more writers and artists. But that takes a groundswell and combination of things to happen and in the modern world there are lots of other things dividing fans' attention than say 40 years ago.

Modern technology has made it easier than ever to get your work seen by others, but that effectively has made it harder to get work because you're now competing with virtually the entire world instead of just people in your local community. It's hard to put that genie back into the bottle.

juan.a.stewart
03-05-2016, 04:32 PM
Modern technology has made it easier than ever to get your work seen by others, but that effectively has made it harder to get work because you're now competing with virtually the entire world instead of just people in your local community. It's hard to put that genie back into the bottle.

HA! So true! Interesting.