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sasquatchiscool
08-16-2015, 01:35 PM
I was wondering what experience anyone has had making a living creating their own stories and comics?

How do you turn your comics into a living?

paul brian deberry
08-16-2015, 05:56 PM
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B-McKinley
08-17-2015, 09:28 AM
I'm doing well enough with the day job that trying to make a living from comics would just be masochistic. The more I learned about what making a living doing comics entailed and how unstable that could be, the more I became interested in keeping making a living and making comics as separate parts of my life.

sasquatchiscool
08-17-2015, 01:46 PM
That is a question I have. Why are there so many comic writers but not many making a living off their own creations?

Most have a day job.

How many have at least 10,000-100,000 viewers?

Bishop
08-17-2015, 02:14 PM
That is a question I have. Why are there so many comic writers but not many making a living off their own creations?

Most have a day job.

How many have at least 10,000-100,000 viewers?

Some reasons:

It is really hard for readers to find the good/quality amidst all the crap.

It's really hard for good writers to find good artists to support their vision, because most often they can't afford to pay them.

There is not a good central location for readers to go (Comixology is the best known, I guess).

Online consumers have come to expect online content to be free. It is hard to make a living when you are giving away your product unless you can make money with ads.

Online customers don't like ad's.

B-McKinley
08-17-2015, 02:43 PM
How many have over 10,000 viewers? Based only on title and not the actual writer or artist ... about 200.

July sales figures (http://www.comichron.com/monthlycomicssales/2015/2015-07.html)

Yes, that neglects all online comics, but there isn't much transparency there. So let's say between 200-1,000. And many of those probably have day jobs just for stability, insurance, not having to withhold your own taxes, etc.

The general consensus is you only need 1,000 true fans (http://kk.org/thetechnium/1000-true-fans/) (not readers) to support yourself.

I don't want to discourage anyone from writing, or drawing, or making comics in anyway. Here's my advice: Make awesome comics. Be nice to everyone. If you do those two things then everything else will take care of itself (except self-employment taxes).

HouseStark
08-19-2015, 03:14 PM
I've been trying for years ... to no avail. And I've been published several times over! Failing getting a big break via networking, you really need to get your work seen by as many eyeballs as possible. Activity creates possibilities. So if you can't get a publisher to take a chance on you, find a different way.

One way, is to put out free, good web content out there for a long period of time. If you're any good, you will build an audience. And that audience is more likely to buy your subsequent products than someone who doesn't know you from squat. Visit Kickstarter for examples of web comic compilations that made big bucks. There's more than one!

And if you have large quantities of good stuff out there that's easily accessible, then the more likely a publisher is to notice you.

Until then, don't quit your day job. Your wife (or your parents if you live with them)will make your life miserable if you do.

Scribbly
08-19-2015, 04:48 PM
I was wondering what experience anyone has had making a living creating their own stories and comics?

How do you turn your comics into a living?

Is easier to make a living creating stories and comics for others than than working in our own material. Because that effort is paid.
Even having creations of your own, is easier to sell them to some publishers and make a living from what they pay you.