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Robert_S
03-30-2015, 03:04 AM
I'm remembering Watchmen, where Moore wrote some pages of almost pure text to give some insight into the motivations of the people the novel portrayed.

How did you feel about it?

In my story, there is a line of people who held the role the main character takes up and I'm thinking of using this to showcase these individuals. Perhaps a page or two from their personal journals (along with a picture to represent them) or maybe the protagonist (as opposed to the main character) reminiscing.

Are people who read comics willing to read a WoT that blends into the story?

Stewart Vernon
03-30-2015, 04:03 AM
A couple of thoughts...

IF the story is compelling, then I would read it. A lot of people happily read and re-read Watchmen. If that's an example you are using, then it's a good one... if you have a strong story to tell, I don't see why you can't mix some prose-style in your comic.

That said... a LOT of readers are lazy. A lot of people want there to be as little reading as possible. I've seen this in comic books and Technical Manuals. People expect visual mediums to tell most of the story in a visual way, and use text sparingly and only when it is an absolute must.

So... the audience that automatically tunes out to lots of prose? You'll lose them no matter how good your story is. That's an unfortunate fact.

You might want to test it out, if possible, and see if the kind of story you want to tell can be told with less words. If not, then see if your intended audience is one that will have the patience to read a little.

DaveyDouble
03-30-2015, 07:24 AM
Show. Don't tell.

B-McKinley
03-30-2015, 11:26 AM
Switching suddenly to 100% prose will disrupt the rhythm of your story. Comic pages even at their most crowded read really fast. A page of text reads much, much slower in comparison. So inserting some in the middle is like slamming on the brakes. I don't have Watchmen in front of me, but those text pieces may look like they are in the middle, but are likely at the end of the original single issues. (That's how it is with Moore's League of Extraordinary Gentlemen.)

Are the people that would be written about actually essential to telling the story? If not, leave them out. Use it as fodder for a website. Juxtapose the relevant bits of past journal entries against the present action to get some sort of narrative effect (like irony).

Scribbly
03-30-2015, 01:50 PM
Moore everlasting prose descriptions were for the artist to draw the panel. Not for the audience to read it.
After three pages of descriptions the characters dialogue is quite short in words. No more of 35 words per panel as he estates on his strict rule for comics writers.
Did he wrote pages of pure prose text in Watchmen? I don't remember it.

Robert_S
03-30-2015, 01:57 PM
Did he wrote pages of pure prose text in Watchmen? I don't remember it.

There was some pages where a character, sometimes Nightowl or a predecessor, goes gives a discourse on their origins and why they became costumed heroes.

It was actually so well done, it fit right into the story.

Scribbly
03-30-2015, 02:04 PM
There was some pages where a character, sometimes Nightowl or a predecessor, goes gives a discourse on their origins and why they became costumed heroes.

It was actually so well done, it fit right into the story.

Yes, you are right, I found it. Anyway, that's a Moore's personal license.
Not that anyone can do it quite successfully.
The only way to prove yourself is by doing it.

vartemis
03-31-2015, 11:38 AM
Find an interesting way to integrate it.

I did a novel adaptation last year that had prose in a few pages. When possible, backstory was done via panels, but in certain parts the main character read a bible-like book. We had a full or double page splash of the book as an object and made it look as if you were seeing it from the pov of the protagonist. Don't drag it out or overuse it though as it will get old quick.

Johnny
04-01-2015, 11:36 AM
I have a friend who when he first read the Watchmen TPB skipped over the prose/non-sequential parts. He later re-read the book and read those parts. I give him a hard time about it, because I don't get it all, but there you go.

As to whether you should do it or not...I don't know. Alan Moore is Alan Moore (not to diminish your possible talents, as I have no idea--but Alan Moore is Alan Moore, heh).

I don't know that it needs to be done again. However, if I were reading a comic I was interested in, by some dude who is not Alan Moore, and there were prose pages in it, I'd definitely read them.

Robert_S
04-01-2015, 04:47 PM
Then perhaps it might be best to wait for a demand from readers.

Schuyler
04-03-2015, 10:46 PM
I have a friend who when he first read the Watchmen TPB skipped over the prose/non-sequential parts. He later re-read the book and read those parts. I give him a hard time about it, because I don't get it all, but there you go.

As to whether you should do it or not...I don't know. Alan Moore is Alan Moore (not to diminish your possible talents, as I have no idea--but Alan Moore is Alan Moore, heh).

I don't know that it needs to be done again. However, if I were reading a comic I was interested in, by some dude who is not Alan Moore, and there were prose pages in it, I'd definitely read them.

I skipped all those prose pages when I read Watchmen the first time. I read it the second time, and decided to take the time. When I read it recently, I skipped the prose stuff, again. That prose stuff does not help the story, in my opinion. I am just one guy.