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Redking84
03-19-2015, 03:23 PM
I'm getting some practice on speech bubbles but I still welcome feedback on them but I mostly need help on Sound Effects. I'm using balloontales for most of my intel.

http://pre13.deviantart.net/f4b3/th/pre/i/2015/078/8/1/024_by_wielder-d8mb3pj.jpg
http://pre15.deviantart.net/c465/th/pre/i/2015/078/7/a/025_by_wielder-d8mb3rt.jpg

SamRoads
03-19-2015, 10:33 PM
Whilst the SFX need work. I think your balloons need your immediate focus with a much higher priority.

You're not breaking the dialogue up right - this is by far the most important thing to work on. Grab a pro comic and check out their balloons. Physically write out a page of balloon dialogue, looking at how they choose to split up the words onto different lines.

As an example, I suspect:

I NEED
TO INTUBATE,
HIS LUNGS ARE
COLLAPSING

will work much better than

I NEED TO INTUBATE, HIS
LUNGS ARE COLLAPSING

Stewart Vernon
03-20-2015, 02:33 AM
Regarding the sound effects... you have to be careful that your sound effect lettering isn't so stylized that it becomes unreadable AND that it doesn't start to blend in with the artwork.

I had a hard time reading a lot of the sound effects in these panels for both of those reasons.

Redking84
03-20-2015, 09:07 AM
Thanks guys. Felix that's a great idea I'll do that right away.

JimCampbell
03-20-2015, 10:44 AM
Yep. I agree with everything already said. You need to work on those speech balloons -- your leading (line spacing) is too high and your balloons are too elliptical. I'm not a fan of the font, either, but each to their own.

You've also got a lot of errors in a relatively small amount of dialogue: "Untill" is spelled incorrectly, and there are commas missing from "Not gonna lie, Clay, this doesn't look good."

You should also be using a crossbar I for the pronoun "I" in "I've still got" or "I'm not dying". The capital "I" in your font should be different from the lowercase "i". For the pronoun "I" --and only the pronoun-- you should use the uppercase.

You'll find a fairly detailed walkthrough of various sound effect techniques on my blog: here. (http://clintflickerlettering.blogspot.co.uk/2010/11/lettering-in-adobe-illustrator-six.html)

Cheers

Jim

Redking84
03-20-2015, 01:12 PM
Wow! Love the blog Jim can't wait to go through all the info.

JimCampbell
03-20-2015, 02:06 PM
Wow! Love the blog Jim can't wait to go through all the info.

Hmm. You said something similar in January when I linked to it in a discussion of your lettered Transformers pages, but you clearly didn't…

Jim

Redking84
03-21-2015, 04:29 PM
@Jim Not nearly well enough no. I looked for the specific area that I needed intel on, got amateurish results, and went back to drawing and coloring. Now I've got wonky dialogue boxes and inexistent SFX. I tried the pages again, fixing the aforementioned issues. The one that I could not figure out was reducing my spaces between lines. The ‘Space After’ option in the Paragraph Format palette didn't affect my dialogue. Is there something I could've been doing wrong? And Jim your blog is an excellent resource and I have gone through it, but clear as it is I'll still get stuck on stuff or see differing opinions on things. Another pro letterer told me NOT to start/end a line with one word and you show that it is okay. Sorry if I offended
The reworkings:
http://pre07.deviantart.net/c24d/th/pre/i/2015/080/6/9/024_by_wielder-d8mb3pj.jpg
http://pre08.deviantart.net/9959/th/pre/i/2015/080/2/b/025_by_wielder-d8mb3rt.jpg

Redking84
03-21-2015, 10:47 PM
Withdrawn, I got it.

superggraphics
03-22-2015, 01:10 PM
Well, here we go again (and no offense to anyone in particular with what follows), another person who thinks that lettering is so easy a caveman can do it, and there have been a lot of cavemen popping up here trying their hand at lettering lately... Lettering is an art form unto itself and takes years of studying and practice in order to achieve any level of professionalism (just mastering the software, if you are doing it electronically, is a huge learning curve)... Lettering is just as much an important part of creating a comic book as any other component, yet is perceived it seems lately (at least here) to be the easiest to master... Have at it, one and all, by all means, but when solid pros on this board (such as Jim Campbell) give you advice, take it and run with it, don't question it, and above all, don't ignore it and then come back again and ask, “Is this better?”

G

Redking84
03-22-2015, 03:57 PM
Supergraphics I admit I had no idea that went into it. It'll be years before I'm even a passable letterer but as an aspiring artist I have still learned a lot here. One of which is the page size in which an artist should draw. I've read the horror stories.

SamRoads
03-22-2015, 07:32 PM
I think you need to somehow train your eyes to look harder.

Take a look at your words within balloons. Look at this one: 'I'm not dying until my chamber is empty'.

To my eyes, the padding is so off balance (close up to one edge of the balloon, far away from the other) that it screams out like a Steve Vai solo in the midst of a Bach cantata.

You, it would appear, didn't see that. So what's going on? If something like this is not immediately VERY clear to you, it may be that you skills lie in other areas! :)

(There are many other things that I think are mistakes. I just picked one.)

Sam

Redking84
03-23-2015, 12:30 PM
Perhaps. That was not even a thing I had known to look for.

Comics Commando
03-30-2015, 03:07 PM
Don't forget the basic commas. Without them, it looks silly.

...not gonna lie, Clay, this...

That, and your leading is too wide. Look at a published comic--not small press--for visual tips on what the balloons {not bubbles} should look like. And emulate them.


Kurt Hathaway
---------------------------------
Cartoon Balloons Studio
---------------------------------
Lettering • Logos • Pre-Press • Graphic Design • Video
for Print or Web • Entertainment, Advertising or Education!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETGevjPkZso

http://www.cartoon-balloons.com

Comics Commando
03-30-2015, 03:14 PM
<<I have still learned a lot here. One of which is the page size in which an artist should draw.>>

=================

Go to my site:
http://www.cartoon-balloons.com

In the freebies section, I have some files for free download. One is a guide on original art size and how to format bleed pages. Go grab it. Free to anyone reading this.



Kurt Hathaway
---------------------------------
Cartoon Balloons Studio
---------------------------------
Lettering • Logos • Pre-Press • Graphic Design • Video
for Print or Web • Entertainment, Advertising or Education!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETGevjPkZso

http://www.cartoon-balloons.com

Stewart Vernon
03-30-2015, 10:45 PM
I'm finding that a lot of the fonts intended for comic book lettering that contain only uppercase letters still have their leading set as if there were lowercase letters and descenders.

So, for instance, at 24pt the font will have 28.8 leading or something similar. For me, it makes a huge difference just to change the leading to match the point size. Since I know I'll never have any descenders to need that space, I just go in and change that off the bat.

Redking84
03-31-2015, 11:35 AM
Thanks comicscommando and HDMe. Regarding the leading I've tried to fix it by making 'Space after paragraph' to -4pt. Half the time it works fine but other times if I have 4 lines of dialogue it will bring 2 lines closer together and won't affect the rest. Is this a common problem and if so how do I fix it?

JimCampbell
03-31-2015, 11:44 AM
Thanks comicscommando and HDMe. Regarding the leading I've tried to fix it by making 'Space after paragraph' to -4pt. Half the time it works fine but other times if I have 4 lines of dialogue it will bring 2 lines closer together and won't affect the rest. Is this a common problem and if so how do I fix it?

Leading is not the same as "space after". A paragraph is any group of lines with a hard return* at the end of them. The hard return tells the software to put the space after that preceding group of lines.

You need to be changing the leading, aka the line spacing. What software are using to try and do this?

Jim

*A 'hard' return is a normal return. SHIFT-Return gives a soft return, enabling you turn a line without invoking the space after setting.

Redking84
03-31-2015, 01:11 PM
I'm using Adobe Illustrator CS2.

JimCampbell
03-31-2015, 01:44 PM
I'm using Adobe Illustrator CS2.

Pretty sure the 'Character' palette still looks basically the same in CS6 as it did in CS2. The leading control is here:

http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb36/jimcampbell2000/Leading_AI_zpskjmv01nd.jpg

Jim

Redking84
03-31-2015, 02:01 PM
Thanks Jim, that did the trick.

Stewart Vernon
03-31-2015, 03:58 PM
Yeah, I was beaten to the punch there... the Paragraph spacing only changes the space between paragraphs, which you might also need to tweak. I usually get around that by not putting multiple paragraphs in the same text box so I don't always think to change that.

The "leading" setting is part of the Character properties/settings.

Also note... usually the default is "auto"... when you change it to something specific, you will have to keep a note of that if you change the font size again.

So... if you are copy/pasting and editing text boxes to keep the same font/properties on a particular page... but then decide some text needs to be smaller or larger... your "leading" setting will no longer be changing automatically once you have made the manual change.

So... if you have 20 pt font and change that from Auto to 20 pt leading, for example... then copy/paste that somewhere and make that text 18pt, your leading for that new box will still retain the 20 pt setting unless you change it again for that box.

Basically, you just have to pay attention to what you're doing is all I'm saying.

Redking84
03-31-2015, 10:38 PM
That sounds like a lot of important info. I'll have to mess with it to understand it in full but thank you for breaking it down.

JimCampbell
04-01-2015, 05:43 AM
Also note... usually the default is "auto"... when you change it to something specific, you will have to keep a note of that if you change the font size again.

It's deeply unfashionable to say anything nice about Quark Xpress, but if there was one convention/feature I wish Adobe had copied from them, it's incremental leading. In Quark, you can set the leading to, say, +1 and the leading will always be one point higher than the point size of the text. Better yet, if you increased or decreased the leading, it changed the increment, so putting up +1 changed it to +2, and so on.

I really miss incremental leading.

Jim

Stewart Vernon
04-01-2015, 03:51 PM
As I was writing my previous post, I knew there was something I used in the past that worked easier... I haven't used Quark enough to know... but I'm wondering now if Corel Draw or the now non-existent Aldus/Macromedia Freehand maybe? Something I used in the past allowed the same setting for leading you are talking about.

I guess, in theory, you're not supposed to be tinkering with the leading a lot... If you were writing something like a novel or a technical manual, you'd probably set it once for the whole book and be done. They probably just don't think of people using the tools in some of the ways we use them.