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UniverseX259
03-03-2015, 02:17 PM
Seems simple enough, right? It's easy to say that if you spend your time doing anything other than crashing on a couch eating Cheetos all night watching TV that you're not lazy. But lately I've been trying to be more efficient in my creative process, and I realized a lot of my shortcomings were due to laziness (More specifically, micro-laziness). So while I was able to draw a page a day and keep up with things I was still being lazy in certain aspects that were holding me back. Then I saw a lot of similar traits in all aspects of the creative field. So here's some tough love. It may sound like I'm being a dick, but if you want to improve then you need to hear the harsh truth. And if any of these points offend you then it's probably because it applies to you and you know it.

1) If you take action without a goal/Do work that accomplishes nothing, you're lazy: I used to see this a lot in my office jobs, where someone would focus on the small details without seeing the big picture. Even if they were busy as hell or pulling all-nighters, it became clear that they were just pretending to do work to make themselves look competent when really they had no idea what was going on. Setting goals early on in a project just makes everything easier, otherwise you're running around like a chicken with its head cut off. It sounds simple enough, but you have no idea how many projects have been offered to me or that I've actually worked on where the client has the concept in their minds and absolutely nothing else - No ending, no plans for future projects, and even worse no idea what format to release it in.

2) If you micromanage, you're lazy: Corollary to point #1, micromanagement usually stems from laziness. Much like the worker who will overwork themselves on the small details, a micromanager will pick apart minor parts of a project even if the goal of the project is accomplished just so they can justify their jobs. All this says to me is that they're not confident in themselves as leaders or in the project as a whole, so they stress over small details to either make it look like they're doing actual work, or even worse, to make you look like an idiot so they can save face.

3) If you're not striving to get better with every page/script you do, you're lazy: Every piece of work you do should be better than the last. Even if that's not possible, try anyway. I've seen plenty of amateur artists whose work has looked the same for years, even though they've been cranking out work and saying they want to improve. Even if you have limited time to write or draw you can break the process down bit-by-bit and work on it, like focusing on figurework, then focusing on drapery, etc. Either way, don't stagnate.

4) If you constantly say "I'm thinking of...." or "I'm going to.....", you're lazy: And chances are you'll never do the thing you're "thinking of doing". Much like point #1, words have no meaning without action. I worked on a project 5 years ago that still hasn't been released, but the client is still telling me "I'm thinking of releasing it this way...." Maybe there was a setback that held him up, who knows. But all it takes is a little bit of research to find the best way to release something. If you can't be bothered to do this for your own project then it shows an immense lack of care. I personally struggled with this for a while - I kept telling myself "I'm going to set up a sketch blog" without actually doing it because I was too lazy to do a 10-20 minute sketch a day. I finally had to rationalize to myself that 1) The sketches would be great for warming up in the morning for my actual work, and 2) It would be great for business to have a new piece of art online every day. And it was definitely beneficial for me in the long run, and I accomplished much more doing this sketch blog than sitting around and THINKING about doing it ever would.

5) If you're a writer but always wanted to be an artist, you're lazy: I guarantee there are more comic writers out there than comic artists. And I don't blame them, learning to draw SUCKS. I've been drawing for 25 years now and I'm still met with criticism and rejection and I still have so much to improve on. But any time I hear from a writer that they want to be an artist but it was too hard so they became a writer, I just assume they're a shitty writer. They tried to take the easy way out, and since typing on a keyboard is quicker and easier (In theory) than drawing then they found their "calling". But do they apply the same lazy work ethic to their writing? And the sad thing is that since everyone has a word processor then people assume that anyone can be a writer. But that's not the case, and I'd say that good writing can be immensely tougher than learning to draw. And I'd have to say that 3/4 of all scripts that are offered to me are littered with typos at first glance - What other horrors are hidden in these typed pages? See also: Bassists who picked up the bass out of laziness because guitar was too hard.

6) If you make excuses for everything, you're lazy: I've been having issues with a client lately who always has an excuse for why he couldn't get me a script or materials or payment.....If he doesn't just go MIA. I've been keeping up my end of the deal, most of the time working faster than him. For example, he'll tell me "I'll get you everything tonight" and then it never shows up in my inbox until the next day, or sometimes DAYS later with no explanation as to why it was late. During these periods there are chances he'll also stop answering his phone or emails. In these situations I can only assume it's out of laziness, because out-of-one's-control emergencies don't happen everyday, and if an excuse is provided it's never emergency-level. And I honestly wouldn't mind it if he let me know a day or more in advance that things might be slowing down so I can alter my schedule to accommodate it. Instead I'm just left hanging - Will I have a full day of work today or will I be getting nothing?

If you have anything else to add, feel free.

johnjohn
03-03-2015, 03:48 PM
More writers than artists?
I honestly thought it was the other way around.

B-McKinley
03-03-2015, 04:48 PM
You are always practicing something. The question is what are you practicing?

UniverseX259
03-03-2015, 05:17 PM
More writers than artists?
I honestly thought it was the other way around.

This is what I've always felt. Art is really easy to judge and you can usually tell if it's good or bad within a second or 2 just by looking at it. But with a script you have to read it so it's easier for bad writing to fall through the cracks if all you can do is take a glance at it. I've drawn scripts where the problems didn't start to arise until I began laying it out and I realized it made no sense from a visual storytelling standpoint. Plus anyone with a word processor and a command of the English language can, in theory, write a script and have it look professional on the surface. So in that respect it's easier to "write" than it is to pick up a pencil and try to draw a realistic human form if you've never drawn something before.

Either way, good writing and art is something that has to be developed through trial and error. If you don't put in the work or pay your dues then you're trying to get something for nothing.

Steven Forbes
03-03-2015, 06:05 PM
Interesting.

Try no to laugh or snicker too much when I say this, but let's try to keep the conversation here mostly civil. Tempers can easily flare over the subject matter.

Thanks.

Robert_S
03-03-2015, 06:10 PM
2) If you micromanage, you're lazy: Corollary to point #1, micromanagement usually stems from laziness. Much like the worker who will overwork themselves on the small details, a micromanager will pick apart minor parts of a project even if the goal of the project is accomplished just so they can justify their jobs. All this says to me is that they're not confident in themselves as leaders or in the project as a whole, so they stress over small details to either make it look like they're doing actual work, or even worse, to make you look like an idiot so they can save face.


I don't think I'd call micromanager's lazy, rather they don't trust others to do a good job or the right thing. In my opinion, they work harder than they have to.



5) If you're a writer but always wanted to be an artist, you're lazy: I guarantee there are more comic writers out there than comic artists. And I don't blame them, learning to draw SUCKS. I've been drawing for 25 years now and I'm still met with criticism and rejection and I still have so much to improve on. But any time I hear from a writer that they want to be an artist but it was too hard so they became a writer, I just assume they're a shitty writer. They tried to take the easy way out, and since typing on a keyboard is quicker and easier (In theory) than drawing then they found their "calling". But do they apply the same lazy work ethic to their writing? And the sad thing is that since everyone has a word processor then people assume that anyone can be a writer. But that's not the case, and I'd say that good writing can be immensely tougher than learning to draw. And I'd have to say that 3/4 of all scripts that are offered to me are littered with typos at first glance - What other horrors are hidden in these typed pages? See also: Bassists who picked up the bass out of laziness because guitar was too hard.


I'm not wanting to be an artist, but I do floor plans and mockups so the artist has the right idea of what I'm seeing. Is this lazy in your opinion?

UniverseX259
03-03-2015, 06:30 PM
I don't think I'd call micromanager's lazy, rather they don't trust others to do a good job or the right thing.

That's very possible. But if they're hiring people they can't trust to do a good job then isn't that an error on their part? If they did their jobs right then wouldn't they take the time to hire someone who they could trust to do what's needed?

In my personal experience the worst cases of micromanagement have happened when it became very clear that the client was lost or had no idea what they were doing. The worst case of micromanagement I ever had to deal with was on a simple design project where the final product looked NOTHING like the idea he said he was "sure" he wanted. In my opinion his micromanagement was a defense mechanism to save face and still hold the reigns on the project when he was clearly treading water.


I'm not wanting to be an artist, but I do floor plans and mockups so the artist has the right idea of what I'm seeing. Is this lazy in your opinion?

Not at all, and I'd say doing sketches for the artist is going above and beyond to get your vision out there as clearly as possible. Artists aren't mind-readers, so I always ask clients that if they have something VERY specific in mind they want me to draw to give me a detailed description, or provide reference images or sketches. The easier the communication is, the better.

Robert_S
03-04-2015, 05:02 PM
Not at all, and I'd say doing sketches for the artist is going above and beyond to get your vision out there as clearly as possible. Artists aren't mind-readers, so I always ask clients that if they have something VERY specific in mind they want me to draw to give me a detailed description, or provide reference images or sketches. The easier the communication is, the better.

I'm not going to ask you to do any work, because at this time, I can't pay, but I want your opinion since you're an artist. Would this mockup help?

http://i1186.photobucket.com/albums/z373/rjsprawls/transport.jpg

The tongue out front is the cockpit and can hold three (pilot, co-pilot, navigator) and it's more bubble like than flat. The back area rounds up, but it should be a 2/3 - 3/4 transparent bubble.

The back oval area is the seating for diplomats (the main character in my story). The green triangle is a table with a embedded computer monitor, keyboard, etc. There is bucket seating and windows along the perimeter. The cutout section is the entrance. The opening at the back end in a entry way for back room storage and toilets.

The red is the flat floor, but it may/may not be red in the drawing. The blue block I used as a size reference. It's 1x1.7x1 (average space a human takes up).

Would the picture and this description be of help for you to be able to envision both the interior and exterior (mind you, I didn't describe the exterior, but this should give you can idea of the shape)?

Schuyler
03-04-2015, 06:20 PM
Can you stop it from spinning?

Michael Ford
03-04-2015, 06:21 PM
This is an awesome list. This is a list that proves that I am definitely lazy, but it is an awesome, informative list regardless.

With the micromanaging, my interpretation of that is that it is procrastination. Similar to how some people will clean their house to justify putting off some other chore, it is keeping busy to justify not working on other areas. So when someone micromanages, they are spending extra time on something that doesn't need more work so that they don't have to work on other, more difficult, tasks.

Robert_S
03-04-2015, 06:25 PM
Can you stop it from spinning?

Done. I had it spin so an artist could see all angles. Then I was going to slow it down to 40ms/frame, but when you asked to make it stop spinning, I just took a frame out and posted it.

I'm wondering if it might be too big. It's supposed to be a diplomatic shuttle, but I'm not sure I should make it so big.

B-McKinley
03-04-2015, 06:58 PM
Whenever I read articles about management, micromanaging behavior is usually attributed to insecurity in the manager about themselves as a manager. So managing everything is an overcompensation for how they think others see them.

Robert, I would have just said it is a turtle-shaped shuttle. But A.) I work alone, and B.) I'm lazy.

In my own comic I'm planning on modeling the spacecraft all the way and then use that to render really technical illustrations. But A.) 3D modeling just a skill I want to practice. B.) I'm doing all this for my enjoyment first C.) I'm lazy. (or according to one teacher D.) I must hate drawing.)

UniverseX259
03-04-2015, 09:29 PM
I'm not going to ask you to do any work, because at this time, I can't pay, but I want your opinion since you're an artist. Would this mockup help?

http://i1186.photobucket.com/albums/z373/rjsprawls/transport.jpg

The tongue out front is the cockpit and can hold three (pilot, co-pilot, navigator) and it's more bubble like than flat. The back area rounds up, but it should be a 2/3 - 3/4 transparent bubble.

The back oval area is the seating for diplomats (the main character in my story). The green triangle is a table with a embedded computer monitor, keyboard, etc. There is bucket seating and windows along the perimeter. The cutout section is the entrance. The opening at the back end in a entry way for back room storage and toilets.

The red is the flat floor, but it may/may not be red in the drawing. The blue block I used as a size reference. It's 1x1.7x1 (average space a human takes up).

Would the picture and this description be of help for you to be able to envision both the interior and exterior (mind you, I didn't describe the exterior, but this should give you can idea of the shape)?

If this is just for the interior of the shuttle then it does a good job of capturing the essence. But without the description I wouldn't have figured out what it was (A room? A platform?), and if I were to personally draw it sight unseen without discussing it with you I'd probably ask for some rendering of the walls, windows, and even seat formation in the red room to be on the same page. But then again you and your artist might have talked about all this beforehand so less information is needed to get the concept across.

UniverseX259
03-04-2015, 09:51 PM
This is an awesome list. This is a list that proves that I am definitely lazy, but it is an awesome, informative list regardless.

With the micromanaging, my interpretation of that is that it is procrastination. Similar to how some people will clean their house to justify putting off some other chore, it is keeping busy to justify not working on other areas. So when someone micromanages, they are spending extra time on something that doesn't need more work so that they don't have to work on other, more difficult, tasks.

I'm glad it helped! And that's a great analogy, my apartment is only ever clean if scrubbing a filthy, smelly toilet is more pleasant than whatever work-related task I have to do. I've personally found that getting the hard stuff out of the way first just means smooth sailing for the rest of the day. It's also easy to turn a mountain into a molehill in situations like this. If you put off the stuff you don't want to do then you'll end up dreading it more and more as the hours go on and trying to do anything in your power to not do it.

In the case of the micromanager I mentioned before he was obviously dreading showing the project to his boss for final approval and dragged the layout stage on and on for close to 3 weeks (Yikes!). So any time we were close to getting it good to go to the final he kept second-guessing himself and requesting more and more changes, openly telling me he wanted it perfect for the boss. The project went WAY over schedule, and when he finally showed it to the boss it was several days away from the print deadline. And did the boss freak out about the curtains in the background being blue instead of red or a figure needing to be 5% smaller? No, the boss approved it in less than a minute. So the difficulties I faced were due to this client doing damage control over scenarios he only FEARED would happen. Had he been more confident in meeting with the boss to show him the concept I bet we could've wrapped up the layouts in a day or 2.

Michael Ford
03-04-2015, 10:47 PM
In the case of the micromanager I mentioned before he was obviously dreading showing the project to his boss for final approval and dragged the layout stage on and on for close to 3 weeks [...] So the difficulties I faced were due to this client doing damage control over scenarios he only FEARED would happen.

That's rough.

Although, I'm not sure that is about him being lazy. It could simply be his personality type or he was new and didn't want to ruin a good opportunity.

Laziness was probably a factor in it. It's easy to micromanage others to correct small things since it will fall on someone else to get it done. I just don't think I would consider it laziness myself. But I don't know enough about the situation. It could have been pure laziness.

Robert_S
03-05-2015, 05:17 AM
Robert, I would have just said it is a turtle-shaped shuttle. But A.) I work alone, and B.) I'm lazy.


Hehe, I didn't think of calling it an elongated turtle.


In my own comic I'm planning on modeling the spacecraft all the way and then use that to render really technical illustrations. But A.) 3D modeling just a skill I want to practice. B.) I'm doing all this for my enjoyment first C.) I'm lazy. (or according to one teacher D.) I must hate drawing.)

I'm simply not the artist. I have the idea, but I take too freaking long to draw it out.

I know that the propulsion for the said transport is sublight, using four vector maneuverable tubes, two on each side, that accelerate matter to create momentum. Even though the tech is 1000s of years advanced, there is the little matter of me wanting some semblance of physical reality.

I want to be able to call my story science fiction, not fantasy.

paul brian deberry
03-05-2015, 11:21 PM
i was too lazy to read Ian list. can someone dumb it down.

UniverseX259
03-06-2015, 12:49 PM
i was too lazy to read Ian list. can someone dumb it down.

1) Don't be lazy.
2) See #1.