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Schuyler
02-15-2015, 10:28 PM
Hey, everybody.

I wanted to discuss page turns.

I rarely have trouble making the page turn happen where I want it. The problem I have is deciding where the page turn should happen.

I am writing a story about this priest that is wandering an apocalyptic world. At one point he runs into some cannibals. Is the big reveal at the point that he realizes they are roasting a man like a pig on a spit? Or is it at the point when he starts firing his pistol at them?

I already decided but I would be interested in your opinions.

Do you guys ever have trouble with page turns? Either trying to make them fit or figuring out the moment that is right for the page turn.

I know you guys are listening. Let's have a conversation about writing comics.

Stewart Vernon
02-16-2015, 12:51 AM
Speaking more as a reader here since I have much less experience as a fiction writer... I think of the page-turn as a mini-cliffhanger. It doesn't have to be a huge thing, certainly not for every single page... but there should be a sense of anticipation built-in to the last panel before the page turn. There has to be a natural pause as well... since the page turn (on a physical comic anyway) takes time.

So, given your two choices... it would be the moment when he sees Kenny Rogers on the Roast :)

Scribbly
02-16-2015, 04:21 AM
Hey, everybody.

I wanted to discuss page turns.

I rarely have trouble making the page turn happen where I want it. The problem I have is deciding where the page turn should happen.

I am writing a story about this priest that is wandering an apocalyptic world. At one point he runs into some cannibals. Is the big reveal at the point that he realizes they are roasting a man like a pig on a spit? Or is it at the point when he starts firing his pistol at them?

I already decided but I would be interested in your opinions.

Do you guys ever have trouble with page turns? Either trying to make them fit or figuring out the moment that is right for the page turn.

I know you guys are listening. Let's have a conversation about writing comics.
Every page should be a page turn.
What is the turning point? The middle of the sequence.
A sequence is made by 3 consecutive panels.
Being panel 1> introduction, panel 2> climax (or complication) and panel 3 resolution.
In comics the standard is 5 panels per page; this is 2 sequences of action per page. Each time we finish a page with the second panel of the sequence, "panel 2> the complication" we are creating a cliff hanger that must be resolved for the reader by turning the page to see the resolution.

Working with more panels per page this work the same. Every sequence of 3 or 4 panels, the panel that holds the climax of the action is the right momentum for a page turn.

Alyssa
02-16-2015, 05:49 AM
Is the big reveal at the point that he realizes they are roasting a man like a pig on a spit? Or is it at the point when he starts firing his pistol at them?

I think this would be highly dependent on the pacing and mood of the story up to that point. I'm tempted to say the reveal should be on the char-grilled dude, but I wouldn't know unless I was familiar with your story. Maybe the crispy-man-roast isn't the most dramatic thing that happens in that moment.

Scribbly makes a good point, too.

Schuyler
02-16-2015, 09:59 AM
Thanks Alyssa, HDMe, and Scribbly.

I think they both could work, but Alyssa's point rings home with me. It depends on your story.

I put the charbroiled guy at the bottom of the odd page, and the shooting after you turn the page.

Because, the story is about a priest who slowly loses his mind as he wanders the world. The fact that he found cannibals is bad, but only plays a small part in his sanity loss. What is really bad for his sanity is shooting the three guys.

Also, when we get to the bottom of the page and see the spit with a man on it, it makes us want to turn, and find out what happens.

Thanks guys.

I was hoping this would spark a cool conversation about the mechanics of page turns. Oh, well. There is still time.

Scribbly
02-16-2015, 04:24 PM
Back to your specific inquiry,

I am writing a story about this priest that is wandering an apocalyptic world. At one point he runs into some cannibals. Is the big reveal at the point that he realizes they are roasting a man like a pig on a spit? Or is it at the point when he starts firing his pistol at them?

Introduction> He runs into some cannibals
Climax or complication> He realizes they are roasting a man like a pig on a spit. ( Turning point here.)
Resolution> He start firing his pistol at them.

Schuyler
02-16-2015, 04:38 PM
Back to your specific inquiry,

Introduction> He runs into some cannibals
Climax or complication> He realizes they are roasting a man like a pig on a spit. (Turning point here.)
Resolution> He start firing his pistol at them.

Thank you, Scribbly. That is the conclusion that I came to as well.

Can you think of a way that we could make the page turn at the other spot? Where we would see ominous figures and want to know what they are, so we turn the page to see the man on a spit?

I don't want to do it that way, but I think it would be fun to try and move the elements around as an experiment.

-Sky

Scribbly
02-16-2015, 04:57 PM
Thank you, Scribbly. That is the conclusion that I came to as well.

Can you think of a way that we could make the page turn at the other spot? Where we would see ominous figures and want to know what they are, so we turn the page to see the man on a spit?

I don't want to do it that way, but I think it would be fun to try and move the elements around as an experiment.
-Sky
Absolutely. You can do whatever you want with your story.
What you need is to move around these main points of interest. And create new and higher points of interest.
Start sequence:
1)Introduction> TBD. (To be designed.)
2)Climax or complication> He runs into some cannibals.( Page turn here.)

Start new page:
3)Resolution> He realizes they are roasting a man like a pig on a spit.(end sequence)
Same page:
Start new sequence:
1)Introduction> He start firing his pistol at cannibals.
2)Climax or complication> TBD (We need something worst that we are already seeing here)
Maybe something very bad is coming to him. Maybe he is going into something worst.
3)Resolution> TBD. We need a more drastic reaction here. (end sequence.)

Stewart Vernon
02-16-2015, 05:15 PM
More details about the story could change the answer, or course... If, for instance, we had already seen cannibals in the story before then we aren't surprised even if the character is... so what is a surprise to him isn't to us.

That makes his reaction the turning point, rather than the reveal of the cannibals. As others have said, it all depends on what the story is you are telling.

bramjm
02-16-2015, 09:33 PM
I would've also said "depends on the story" before reading the comments, so I want credit, too.

I'd think that maybe the reveal of cannibalism might not be a big deal, implicit in a postapocalyptic setting like this. But the quiet, mild-mannered priest taking to arms? That might be something you want to give some emphasis to.

Which might mean at the bottom of the page, we start to see an unusual reaction to leave us wondering, and then the surprise on the next one.

As noted above, though, it's all about what serves the story. You try thumbnailing it out to get a feel for the flow?

Schuyler
02-16-2015, 11:21 PM
I would've also said "depends on the story" before reading the comments, so I want credit, too.

I'd think that maybe the reveal of cannibalism might not be a big deal, implicit in a postapocalyptic setting like this. But the quiet, mild-mannered priest taking to arms? That might be something you want to give some emphasis to.

Which might mean at the bottom of the page, we start to see an unusual reaction to leave us wondering, and then the surprise on the next one.

As noted above, though, it's all about what serves the story. You try thumbnailing it out to get a feel for the flow?

That is exactly what I am feeling. I did not try thumbnailing it, but I think I will attempt it. I am visualizing every panel and page layout in my mind, though.

Okay, Bramjm. I like your comment.

Earlier we saw the priest pull his little white collar thing, and toss it the wind.

We have already seen the priest pack the gun in his backpack.

We have not seen a single other soul except the priest, which means there were never any other cannibals.

We can see the he is fumbling with his bag in the last panel before the page turn.

Is that revealing too much before the page turn? Does any of the info provided change anyone's answer?

Stewart Vernon
02-17-2015, 01:44 AM
The way you frame it there solidifies my original response. Even if the use of the gun is his first time... he packed it, so he must have thought about using it.

Since you haven't shown cannibals before, that seems like a page turn to me... and the reaction is his first use of the gun on the next page I presume.

Scribbly
02-17-2015, 03:39 AM
What I would suggest is to write the full scene straight, panel by panel, to your satisfaction, and when it gets done then start breaking down in pages, looking for the correct page turn.

Schuyler
02-17-2015, 11:05 AM
What I would suggest is to write the full scene straight, panel by panel, to your satisfaction, and when it gets done then start breaking down in pages, looking for the correct page turn.

Thanks, Scribbly.

I already wrote, and scripted the story. I was merely using a dilemma that I had crossed while making it, to try and create a discussion.

The cannibals have always been at the bottom of the odd page, and the firing of the pistol after we turned the page.

Many of the points that have been brought up, are things that already occurred to me. But, it is nice to see that I am not off base with my thought process.

Thanks, everybody.

-Sky

Scribbly
02-17-2015, 09:25 PM
Thanks, Scribbly.

I already wrote, and scripted the story. I was merely using a dilemma that I had crossed while making it, to try and create a discussion.

The cannibals have always been at the bottom of the odd page, and the firing of the pistol after we turned the page.

Many of the points that have been brought up, are things that already occurred to me. But, it is nice to see that I am not off base with my thought process.

Thanks, everybody.

-Sky
I see. You were having a laugh.

Schuyler
02-17-2015, 09:43 PM
I see. You were having a laugh.

It depends on what you mean by the word 'laugh'.

I created this post with a serious intent. I apologize if you feel I have duped you, but I tried to be clear from the beginning that this was an open discussion. I wanted other people to present some of their own dilemmas. Since no one did I tried to discuss my idea to its fullest. Sussing out all the ideas presented.

-Sky

Robert_S
02-18-2015, 08:28 AM
I am writing a story about this priest that is wandering an apocalyptic world. At one point he runs into some cannibals. Is the big reveal at the point that he realizes they are roasting a man like a pig on a spit? Or is it at the point when he starts firing his pistol at them?


I'd say the reveal is seeing the man being roasted and the resolution is the gunfire/rescue.

So, if it were me, I'd probably break it between the reveal and the resolution, but it also depends. To pull an example from my story, the main character has been rescued and is being escorted through a "secret" facility:

PAGE 1
We open in on Dante escorted to a meeting with US leadership at an undisclosed location. Armed guards are everywhere and people bustle about. Some look frightened, others determined, but all move quickly and past him in opposite or same direction. Dante's escort marines are armed with 9mm pistols. NOTE: Hats are not worn indoors.

PANEL 1
Overhead and forward of the trio, Dante has a marine in BDUs in front and behind him. They have pistols in holsters. There is a constant flow of people, both military and civilian, heading in both directions past them. A door on the left lays just ahead.

PANEL 2, 3, 4, 5
From the side, as Dante and the two marines on each side stand before the door.

MARINE #1
Go inside, sir.

Dante gives the marine a worried look, not knowing what's ahead.

Back to the marine, stoic, emotionless, robotic.

MARINE #1
Go inside, sir.

Shot from side again, Dante opened the door and is stepping inside.

PAGE 2
PANEL 1
Inside the room, a shot over Dante's shoulder. The US leadership of President of the United States, Jonas Mitchel, Vice President, Daniel Rawlings, Secretary of state, Thomas Pierce, secretary of defense, Gabriel Hutchins, New Mexico State Representative Claudia Stewart and a host of civilian and military personal gather in discreet groups, stop their discussions and look at Dante.
A long conference table, upon which are three conference call devices, dominates the room. Each seat has a folder before it.

PANEL 2
A closer shot of Mitchel (POTUS), Rawlings (VPOTUS), Pierce (SoS) and Hutchins (SoD). Mitchel has stepped forward, and motions Dante to take a seat.

MITCHEL
Welcome Mr. Ericsson. It's fortunate we arrived when we did. You might well be on your way to Iran or worse. Please have a seat. There is a lot to cover.

Schuyler
02-18-2015, 07:29 PM
I can't make sense of your script, Robert.

I think they are in a hallway, because there is a door. But, in the paragraph before it says they are in an undisclosed location. I imagined a college campus look with trees and what not. That is totally in my head I realize, but it is what I imagined.

Then it says that panel 2, 3, 4, and 5 are all "From the side, as Dante and the two marines on each side stand before the door."

But then it lists some panel changes that do not have numbers. I imagine those are 3, 4, and 5, respectively. I am not sure why you chose to write it that way.

I would get rid of "not knowing what is ahead". I think it was panel 3. Does the artist need that info?

Then on Page 2, you describe a bunch of characters by name and role. That seems awkward since the artist is the only one who will read that.

I get a better sense of the room, but I am not sure what "host of military and civilian personnel gather in discreet groups" looks like.

I feel like there is tension in this page turn, except I am not sure where this lies in your story. Is this page 1 and 2 of issue one?

-Sky

Robert_S
02-19-2015, 11:19 AM
I can't make sense of your script, Robert.

I think they are in a hallway, because there is a door. But, in the paragraph before it says they are in an undisclosed location. I imagined a college campus look with trees and what not. That is totally in my head I realize, but it is what I imagined.


I'm in rough right now. When I write, I keep all panels in one scene on one page. Now I'm dividing up the pages and will go back to work on scene detail.

I have a process going that seems to work for me.


Dialog first - Since I rely on dialog, I write up what is being said back and forth.
Rough scenes - to divide up what is happening with respect to dialog.
Divide panels into pages.
Rewrite


I'm in between 2 and 3 right now into chapter 2 or 3, trying to workout where to divide the panels into pages for effect.

In this particular case, Dante is being escorted after being rescued from the Iranians, through a government facility, sort of a bunker, to meet with the executives of the federal government. When he steps through the door, he's meeting the antagonists and allies and will start to realize who BES is and how she fits within the scheme of things.

I decided to break pages at entry through the door. One page leaves mystery as to what awaits him, then the next shows it's a meeting with people he normally would never meet in his life. Also, he learns that he is or was on the kill list for both sides of the conflict in the story.

It's going very, very slow right now, because I'm not accustomed to writing in camera angles because that is what I would normally leave for reader imagination. I'm also creating floor plans of key rooms and creating the skeleton for a KS campaign video.



I feel like there is tension in this page turn, except I am not sure where this lies in your story. Is this page 1 and 2 of issue one?


I'm not sure where it falls within the except to say it's somewhere into chapter 2 or 3. When I compile from Scrivener, I compile only that part I'm working on so it starts it's numbering at 1 and goes up.

Here is what it looks like inside scrivener:

PAGE <$n>
We open in on Dante escorted to a meeting with US leadership at an undisclosed location. Armed guards are everywhere and people bustle about. Some look frightened, others determined, but all move quickly and past him in opposite or same direction. Dante's escort marines are armed with 9mm pistols. NOTE: Hats are not worn indoors.
PANEL <$sn>
Overhead and forward of the trio, Dante has a marine in BDUs in front and behind him. They have pistols in holsters. There is a constant flow of people, both military and civilian, heading in both directions past them. A door on the left lays just ahead.
PANEL <$sn>, <$SN>, <$SN>, <$SN>
From the side, as Dante and the two marines on each side stand before the door.
MARINE #1
Go inside, sir.
Dante gives the marine a worried look, not knowing what's ahead.
Back to the marine, stoic, emotionless, robotic.
MARINE #1
Go inside, sir.
Shot from side again, Dante opened the door and is stepping inside.

PAGE <$n>
People in the room:
POTUS Jonas Mitchel, Caucasian, 50s.
VPOTUS Daniel Rawlings, Caucasian, 50s.
Secretary of State Thomas Pierce, Caucausian, 40s.
Secretary of Defense Gabriel Hutchins, African-American, 50s.
New Mexico State Representative Esperanza Stewart, Mexican-American, 30s.
Mission Commander DAVID MCDONALD, Caucasian, 40s.
Tactical Dynamics, Inc. CEO STEVEN O'DELL, Caucasian, 50s.
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs.
Various unnamed civilian and military personnel.
PANEL <$sn>
Inside the room, a shot over Dante's shoulder. People group by status. Executive leadership, Joint Chiefs and O'Dell huddle to one part of the room, Stewart and McDonald with a few other civilian and military personnel in another.

All those <$N> and <$SN>s get replaced by numbers, so I don't have to track it other than the occasional compile to see how many panels there are on a page. The <$N>s continue to go up from the first one encountered. The <$SN> counts up, but resets to 1 when it encounters a <$N>. So, the software automatically numbers pages and panels for me. I just have to divide it up.



Then it says that panel 2, 3, 4, and 5 are all "From the side, as Dante and the two marines on each side stand before the door."


I admit that is bad and it needs clarification. When I reread it, it didn't sound right. But I'm trying to divide panels into pages now and not get sidetracked. But I'll note that I need to say it's in an undisclosed building (government facility). But, I think you're right. I'll divide it up into discreet panels and use the multiples for panels that have a closer connection.


But then it lists some panel changes that do not have numbers. I imagine those are 3, 4, and 5, respectively. I am not sure why you chose to write it that way.


I was under the impression that is reasonable for scenes that don't really change. It's focused on the Dante with the Marines. It may be going back and forth between faces, but it's still Dante and the marine escort standing at the door, with them telling him to step inside and him not knowing what's going to happen.

Perhaps you can advise on how to describe angles for the camera? I get confused on whether to use angles relative to character or relative to panel.

I'm trying to convey facial expressions for the people in there. Since I was told I can't use inner monologue/dialogue to convey emotional expressions, I have to do it someway. I'm still working this.

I have dialog for 1/2 the book written, but only about 20% of scenes and that is still rough. But at least I'm learning what is working for people.

Still, pita trying to adapt action to MOTs.

As for the naming, most of them are antagonists to some degree and there's a high probability they will reoccur. Rawlings and Mitchel most definitely (Rawlings is the main antagonist). O'DELL is CEO of a Defense Contractor and he's salivating over getting his hands on the Atlas' tech, so he's likely to make a reappearance.

I'll tell you, the writing is not hard. It's the rewrites and rereads where it becomes work. Back to work. I have a seven day hiatus right now, so I'll put the time into the script.

Schuyler
02-19-2015, 12:40 PM
Hey, Robert.

I like your method of writing. I feel like I am very similar.

What are the people saying?

That is the first thing I tackle.

Mostly my rough scenes have already been figured out in the dialogue stage. I try to keep the number of actual places to a minimum for the sake of my artist.

Then I try and fit the dialogue into pages. Bob and Tommy conversation is 2 pages, or something like that.

Generally by the time I am typing it up, I have already gone through all the processes you described. You and I are a little different. I imagine you are typing everything, whereas I like pen and paper for all those beginning steps.

Perhaps you can advise on how to describe angles for the camera? I get confused on whether to use angles relative to character or relative to panel.

I feel like I am the worst person to ask about angles. But, I am an a-hole and still have an opinion.

I would say that you need to decide what is important. Are you going to dictate every angle? Are you not going to dictate any? Are you somewhere in between?

You said that you are not used to including an angle. You don't have to. People are going to ask about it, just ignore them.

The panel descriptions that you write, make sense to me when they are short.

From the side, as Dante and the two marines on each side stand before the door.

I imagine a marine in the foreground, with Dante just beyond him, and another marine beyond Dante. The door is on the right side of the panel. Dante has his right side to us and the marines have their left sides to us.

Did I get it right?

Dante gives the marine a worried look, not knowing what's ahead.

This one has options. I think that is good, because your artist won't be tied to one idea.

It could be just Dante looking off camera. He is worried.

It could also be Dante from behind, keeping one of the marines in the shot. Dante has his head turned towards the Marine, so we can see his worried look.

Back to the marine, stoic, emotionless, robotic.

This one, I imagine just the Marine. Maybe only from his waist up.

The reason that we are supposed to write in camera angles is because we are supposed to be visualizing the panel and page as we write. I think you are visualizing things, but sometimes give more information than we need.

My first advice to you, is to describe what you are visualizing. Forget the camera angle. If you describe it well, an angle will be inferred.

My second advice is to write smaller panel descriptions. Your short descriptions are easy to read and imagine. As soon as you start adding stuff they get bloated and seem to have information that cannot be drawn.

-Sky

Robert_S
02-19-2015, 01:44 PM
I imagine a marine in the foreground, with Dante just beyond him, and another marine beyond Dante. The door is on the right side of the panel. Dante has his right side to us and the marines have their left sides to us.



Mostly. I've rewritten the page/scene so it shows Dante being escorted into the underground bunker in Area 51 (I decided to go specific) and the marines escort in blocking positions. One in front and one behind.

An elevator scene has the two marines on each side, then into the corridor (making it specific) has them blocking front and back.

When they reach the door, one of the marines is left and another right, again, blocking positions. They can't afford their high value subject going rabbit on them.




Did I get it right?


Pretty much, I think. Here is the revision, tell me your opinion, but it still emphasizes in this particular case, the reveal is left for the next page and I'm beginning to think perhaps you should save your reveal for the page turn as well:


PAGE <$n>
We open in on Dante being taken to an underground facility in Area 51. A airfield, where BES lands a transport is nearby, but I leave it to the artist's discretion when to show this.

PANEL <$sn>
Long shot of three people walking in line from a helicopter to one of a group of buildings in Area 51. This is an underground bunker for the government.

PANEL <$sn>
Shot of Dante in an elevator blocked by two marine escorts, one on each side. The marines wear BDUs and carry 9mm sidearms. The marines stand 2-3 inches over Dante and look very fit and hardened in comparison.

PANEL <$sn>
Walking through a corridor, Dante as again blocked by the two marines, one in front, one behind. There is a constant flow of people, both military and civilian, heading in both directions past them. They pass doors on both side, but one ahead and to the left of them is where they are destined.

PAGE <$n>

PANEL <$sn>, <$SN>, <$SN>, <$SN>

They've stopped at the door. We're looking at the door with Dante in front of it and the Marines to each side. The marines are facing Dante and Dante faces the one in front.
MARINE #1
Go inside, sir.

Focus on Dante's face, furrows in his forehead, eyes of fear, gives the marine a worried look.

Over Dante's shoulder, looking at the first marine stoic, emotionless, robotic.
MARINE #1
Go inside, sir.

Shot looking at the door. Dante has opened it and is halfway through with the marines still looking at him.


Does this do a better job of describing what I see and help you to see it more? The only thing left is to describe Dante's clothing. A man was shot with exploding bullets in front of him, so I'm trying to decide if he got a change of clothing or if he's still wearing the blood soaked shirt. I'll probably give him a change. He is meeting the president after all.

Schuyler
02-19-2015, 01:58 PM
I decided to break pages at entry through the door. One page leaves mystery as to what awaits him, then the next shows it's a meeting with people he normally would never meet in his life. Also, he learns that he is or was on the kill list for both sides of the conflict in the story.

I did not get the kill list part. Perhaps there is context to him ending up in Iran, or maybe there is dialogue that is part of what you did not post.

However, I did get the mystery part.

His facial expression, the Marines robotic responses, and the setting will leave you with the sense that it is pretty secret stuff. No one knows, or is going to talk about what is behind the door.

The setting will have to use our own memory of secret military bases, those memories being set by other movies or comics we've already seen. You should describe your setting better, it would help.

But, yeah I think it is a good page turn.

I will want to know, whats behind the door, even if I already have an idea.

Then, you also mentioned that we turn the page, and are introduced to some of the antagonists of the story for the first time. I think that works too.

Anyways, I thought this might be helpful.

http://abbadabba.com/wallywood/wallywood22panels.pdf

It shows some angles that always work, as he says. This might be more for artists, but I find it useful.

Schuyler
02-19-2015, 02:02 PM
Mostly. I've rewritten the page/scene so it shows Dante being escorted into the underground bunker in Area 51 (I decided to go specific) and the marines escort in blocking positions. One in front and one behind.

An elevator scene has the two marines on each side, then into the corridor (making it specific) has them blocking front and back.

When they reach the door, one of the marines is left and another right, again, blocking positions. They can't afford their high value subject going rabbit on them.





Pretty much, I think. Here is the revision, tell me your opinion, but it still emphasizes in this particular case, the reveal is left for the next page and I'm beginning to think perhaps you should save your reveal for the page turn as well:



Does this do a better job of describing what I see and help you to see it more? The only thing left is to describe Dante's clothing. A man was shot with exploding bullets in front of him, so I'm trying to decide if he got a change of clothing or if he's still wearing the blood soaked shirt. I'll probably give him a change. He is meeting the president after all.

I actually like the page turn better, when he was at the door. Because, of the back and forth tension that exists between Dante and the Marines.

But I did find the panel descriptions easier to understand. It does lack angles but it doesn't give too many options either.

-Sky

Robert_S
02-19-2015, 02:10 PM
But I did find the panel descriptions easier to understand. It does lack angles but it doesn't give too many options either.


And that's where I'm having trouble. It almost feels like I want to have an artist already so we can work out problems on the fly. I don't want to hem them in, but I also have the vision in my head guiding me.

I'll keep working on it, but I like leaving the reveal for the top of the next page.

Are all books the same with even pages on the left and odd numbered pages on the right? Because I have a splash page that I'd like to be a big reveal that they have to turn the page to.

Schuyler
02-19-2015, 03:23 PM
And that's where I'm having trouble. It almost feels like I want to have an artist already so we can work out problems on the fly. I don't want to hem them in, but I also have the vision in my head guiding me.

I'll keep working on it, but I like leaving the reveal for the top of the next page.

Are all books the same with even pages on the left and odd numbered pages on the right? Because I have a splash page that I'd like to be a big reveal that they have to turn the page to.

Yes.

I guess if you are submitting an odd number of pages to an anthology, your page turns might get messed up. By odd number, I mean 5, 7, 9 pages etc. But, I really don't know.

-Sky

Schuyler
02-19-2015, 03:26 PM
And that's where I'm having trouble. It almost feels like I want to have an artist already so we can work out problems on the fly. I don't want to hem them in, but I also have the vision in my head guiding me.

I put my big story aside for a minute. I am going to write some shorts and work stuff out on those. I think that might be good for you too.

You could work with an artist and not be working on your 'baby'. Then, all that info you learned can be taken and worked into your 'baby'. It might be really useful to you, but I don't know.

-Sky

Robert_S
02-19-2015, 08:21 PM
I put my big story aside for a minute. I am going to write some shorts and work stuff out on those. I think that might be good for you too.


What exactly is a short? Is it a single 22-page issue or less than that?

SamRoads
02-19-2015, 09:30 PM
I would say a 22 page is kinda long for what I would mean by a short.

Check out one of the comics anthologies. The stories in them are 4-10 pages long. A great place to get one of your pieces published as a first step up the ladder to being a great creator! :)