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symulachra
02-02-2015, 02:15 PM
Hello. I have been practicing my lettering on pages from the activity archives. Any suggestions, criticisms, etc. would be appreciated. Thanks.

Here's the first:

http://symulachra.deviantart.com/art/Lettering-Sample-5-506644487

http://th06.deviantart.net/fs71/PRE/i/2015/012/d/6/lettering_sample_5_by_symulachra-d8dn5dz.png

paul brian deberry
02-02-2015, 04:41 PM
Not bad balloons, tails are awful but overall it's a good job.

Little practice and you'll be fine.

SamRoads
02-02-2015, 09:12 PM
Overall it's great work, lots of variety. Use of different balloons, padding around the writing, word placement - all good.

I agree that the tails are a place where you can improve quite a bit. They don't seem near enough the mouths of the speakers, they're a little short, and sometimes a little wide.

But whilst I think the writer needs a kick for so much text in a small space, the only issue I have that's serious is the awkwardness of reading the text in order on Panels 1 and Panel 2. You fair have to zig zag around to get it. Hard to read.

Nice.

Charles
02-03-2015, 02:20 PM
For the most part, the lettering in this page is pretty good. If you have a larger version, then post it, because what you are wanting is for people to nitpick the details of your lettering - and that easier to do, when you can see the finer points of details better.

Panel 1

It lacks consistency. Primarily, the offending element is the smaller font size in the bottom speech bubble of Panel 1. Aside from looking visually out of place, as far as text size goes, this approach also yielded excessive white space in that particular bubble around the text.

In lettering, quality and precision matter a great deal. The very best letterers tend to be very detail oriented.

The lettering in Panel 1 has punctuation deficiencies. "The creature is mine now! " should be "The creature is mine, now!" That's one missing comma.

"Boy, Trance is really scraping the bottom of the ugly barrel for his freaks isn't he?" should be "Boy, Trance is really scraping the bottom of the ugly barrel for his freaks, isn't he?" That's a second missing comma.

Because there is so much white space inside that bottom speech bubble in Panel 1, it begs the question of why that bubble needs to touch the left and bottom edges of the panel? It would make more sense, if the text was large enough to fill that bubble.

Without going into all of what I said, elsewhere, about lettering as an exercise in white space, recently, I would emphasize that lettering puts you in the role of managing white space - across the page a a whole, and across panels, individually.

SOURCE: http://digitalwebbing.com/forums/showpost.php?p=1841462&postcount=27

In Panel 1, the utilization of different shapes and styles of speech bubbles yields visual variety. That makes that particular panel more visually attractive.

Over on the ChrisOatley.com website, there's an article titled, "Comic Layout Tutorial: The Comic Lettering Spell."

SOURCE: http://chrisoatley.com/comic-lettering-comic-layout/

At the beginning of that article is an image, one that says, "Make sure your comic lettering has some punch!"

Visually, punch can be achieved by lettering a number of different ways. The font that you choose can have visual punch, as can the speech bubbles. Special effects lettering can have visual punch, also, as can impacting techniques, such as bold and italics.

Panel 2

"Give him back now or I'm gonna clean the street with your face!" should be "Give him back, now, or I'm gonna clean the street with your face!" That's a third missing comma.

"Wow Rox you sound all tough and s***" should be "Wow, Rox! You sound all tough and s***!" or "Wow, Rox, you sound all tough and s***!" Thus, that's a fourth missing comma, and possibly a fifth, and at least one missing exclamation point, too.

"Give it up or we'll--" should be "Give it up, or we'll--" Yet another missing comma.

Because you make no use of bold impacting technique, the lettering on the page is more visually bland than it needs to be. That's one of the more obvious things that letterers do to increase the visual punch of their lettering handicraft. Factor in that your lettering, here, does not enjoy the visual contrast that the art being colored would provide, you definitely want to take advantage of the visual spectrum, such that you gain the net visual positives afforded by impacting techniques.

Panel 3

"You'll do nothing but my bidding after I sup on your genes." should be "You'll do nothing but my bidding, after I sup on your genes." Again, a missed comma is the culprit.

Punctuation issues tend to emanate from bad grammar, lack of attention to detail, rushing from one thing to another, or your eyes just plain missing them as a matter of simple error. They do tend to plague independently-published comic books, though.

The "Vroot!" quip should stand out more, I think. That character enjoys very limited dialogue in these panels. Plus, Vroot is what? A sound? Increasing the size of it would likely increase the visual punch of that particular panel.

Panel 4

Finally, some special effects lettering - but, what we get treated to is an exercise in visual minimalism. She's levitating a car, for crying out loud, but we get a glove compartment's portion of special effects lettering. This is a good example, I feel, of how to visually undersell a scene. She's given choice dialogue - Eat Aerostart Freak! -but, God forbid that the letterer visually emphasize through the special effects lettering the sheer magnitude of this feat. A visually impressive act warrants visually impressive special effects lettering. It's as mush about visually feeling what's being depicted, as it is about actually seeing it. We see the car. We should "feel" the Fwoosh.

"Eat Aerostar freak" should be "Eat Aerostar, freak!" That's another ping on the missing comma scoreboard.

The last three panels aren't particularly problematic, other than that they share a common visual trait with all of the other panels on this page of sequentials. Namely, your failure to wield bold as a visual tool to increase visual interest on this page, as something to draw the eye to select instances of text, results in the page as a whole, not to mention the various panels, individually, not having nearly as much visual punch as they otherwise might.

Visually, mix it up a bit. When you place text in bold or italics, what you are doing is adding emphasis. But, the purpose is not to simply emphasize a given bit of text, when the reader is reading what has been lettered. Rather, the idea is to also, in addition to emphasizing for reading, emphasize in order to please the human eye in a visual manner. One is to aid reading. The other is to aid the visuals.

The human eye likes variety. It is drawn to it. It is attracted to it. Just walk outside, no matter where you are, and look at what nature offers up, visually speaking. There's shapes and sizes and colors and textures and lighting and shadows. Variety is not just the spice of life. It is also the spice of visual life, particularly where what we are talking about is sequentials in comic books.

Lettering is not merely lettering. It is not simply about text. It is more than an exercise in the manipulation and/or presentation of text upon a page.

It is also an art within the overarching art form that is the comic book. It is, thus, an art form within an art form. As such, it is its own beast, It is its own creature. It enjoys its own existence. It has its own importance - as do all of the various little component pieces that collectively comprise the art form that is lettering. At its core essence, it is trek across a never-ending plain of details.

The letterer may well be limited by the frequency with which they can legitimately get away with stealing the visual show, where a given comic book is concerned. But, make no mistake about it - the lettering serves no other master. It is not beholden unto either the artist nor the inker nor the colorist. I won't even mention the peasants of the flats.

No matter what scene is depicted within a page of sequentials, it is still the letterer's canvas. But, the letterer must respect that which comes before. After all, art and inking and coloring all help to set the stage for the real star of the comic book show - the leterer, that oft-unsung hero of comic book reading fans, everywhere.

That feeble Vroot and that modest Fwoosh denote visual impotence on the part of the letterer. Answer the call of your destiny! What you treated us to was the visual equivalent of moisture farming on Tatooine. What you should have given us (but more importantly, given to yourself) was a demonstration of your Jedi lettering powers.

Gorgeous art and great coloring will make people visually swoon. People will ooh and ah. But, choice lettering will make people read. It will lull them into a comic book, and they will lose themselves in - not the art nor the coloring - but the story, itself.

Thus, the letterer serves a greater cause. You can't serve that cause by piddling around on some far-flung text-based moisture farm.

Engage the eye! Seek it out! Command and retain its attention!

Comics Commando
02-03-2015, 03:13 PM
Overall, a pretty good start with room to improve. I personally don't like this page as an exercise. It's a challenge even to experienced guys like me with all that copy in so many tight spaces. This is a tough one for a beginner, and you did a good job with it.

But, yeah--the punctuation is very weak. This may be a weakness of the script you had, but this is really 8th-grade-level stuff here. There shouldn't be any mistakes in an exercise script, but if there are, they should be fixed in the lettering stage. When my name goes on a book, I don't want my work to be riddled with mistakes--even if they're in the script. It's embarrassing.



Kurt Hathaway
---------------------------------
Cartoon Balloons Studio
---------------------------------
Lettering • Logos • Pre-Press • Graphic Design • Video
for Print or Web • Entertainment, Advertising or Education!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETGevjPkZso

http://www.cartoon-balloons.com

symulachra
02-04-2015, 10:29 AM
Panel 1

It lacks consistency. Primarily, the offending element is the smaller font size in the bottom speech bubble of Panel 1. Aside from looking visually out of place, as far as text size goes, this approach also yielded excessive white space in that particular bubble around the text.

In lettering, quality and precision matter a great deal. The very best letterers tend to be very detail oriented.

The lettering in Panel 1 has punctuation deficiencies. "The creature is mine now! " should be "The creature is mine, now!" That's one missing comma.

"Boy, Trance is really scraping the bottom of the ugly barrel for his freaks isn't he?" should be "Boy, Trance is really scraping the bottom of the ugly barrel for his freaks, isn't he?" That's a second missing comma.

Because there is so much white space inside that bottom speech bubble in Panel 1, it begs the question of why that bubble needs to touch the left and bottom edges of the panel? It would make more sense, if the text was large enough to fill that bubble.

Without going into all of what I said, elsewhere, about lettering as an exercise in white space, recently, I would emphasize that lettering puts you in the role of managing white space - across the page a a whole, and across panels, individually.

SOURCE: http://digitalwebbing.com/forums/showpost.php?p=1841462&postcount=27

In Panel 1, the utilization of different shapes and styles of speech bubbles yields visual variety. That makes that particular panel more visually attractive.

Over on the ChrisOatley.com website, there's an article titled, "Comic Layout Tutorial: The Comic Lettering Spell."

SOURCE: http://chrisoatley.com/comic-lettering-comic-layout/

At the beginning of that article is an image, one that says, "Make sure your comic lettering has some punch!"

Visually, punch can be achieved by lettering a number of different ways. The font that you choose can have visual punch, as can the speech bubbles. Special effects lettering can have visual punch, also, as can impacting techniques, such as bold and italics.

Panel 2

Because you make no use of bold impacting technique, the lettering on the page is more visually bland than it needs to be. That's one of the more obvious things that letterers do to increase the visual punch of their lettering handicraft. Factor in that your lettering, here, does not enjoy the visual contrast that the art being colored would provide, you definitely want to take advantage of the visual spectrum, such that you gain the net visual positives afforded by impacting techniques.

Panel 3

The "Vroot!" quip should stand out more, I think. That character enjoys very limited dialogue in these panels. Plus, Vroot is what? A sound? Increasing the size of it would likely increase the visual punch of that particular panel.

Panel 4

Finally, some special effects lettering - but, what we get treated to is an exercise in visual minimalism. She's levitating a car, for crying out loud, but we get a glove compartment's portion of special effects lettering. This is a good example, I feel, of how to visually undersell a scene. She's given choice dialogue - Eat Aerostart Freak! -but, God forbid that the letterer visually emphasize through the special effects lettering the sheer magnitude of this feat. A visually impressive act warrants visually impressive special effects lettering. It's as mush about visually feeling what's being depicted, as it is about actually seeing it. We see the car. We should "feel" the Fwoosh.

"Eat Aerostar freak" should be "Eat Aerostar, freak!" That's another ping on the missing comma scoreboard.

The last three panels aren't particularly problematic, other than that they share a common visual trait with all of the other panels on this page of sequentials. Namely, your failure to wield bold as a visual tool to increase visual interest on this page, as something to draw the eye to select instances of text, results in the page as a whole, not to mention the various panels, individually, not having nearly as much visual punch as they otherwise might.

Visually, mix it up a bit. When you place text in bold or italics, what you are doing is adding emphasis. But, the purpose is not to simply emphasize a given bit of text, when the reader is reading what has been lettered. Rather, the idea is to also, in addition to emphasizing for reading, emphasize in order to please the human eye in a visual manner. One is to aid reading. The other is to aid the visuals.

1 - In Panel 1, the script called for soft speech, hence the small text. I see where I could have butted the balloon to manipulate the white space better (also possibly shrink balloon a little).

2 - In regards to Bold, I was unclear as to how much say a letterer had in using it. To be safe, I just followed the script. Your insight into its multiple uses is really helpful.

3 - The SFX is in relation to Burnout igniting his flames in the background and not Freefall. Its small size was to indicate that it was coming from him. I would have emphasized the fire with color (if art had color), but despite being an exercise, I still wanted to keep the b/w consistency. I had another version with a much bigger gradient FWOOSH masked behind her legs, but I felt it was distracting, especially since she was the main focus in this panel.


Thank you for such detailed response and for catching so many missed commas.

symulachra
02-04-2015, 10:42 AM
Overall, a pretty good start with room to improve. I personally don't like this page as an exercise. It's a challenge even to experienced guys like me with all that copy in so many tight spaces. This is a tough one for a beginner, and you did a good job with it.

But, yeah--the punctuation is very weak. This may be a weakness of the script you had, but this is really 8th-grade-level stuff here. There shouldn't be any mistakes in an exercise script, but if there are, they should be fixed in the lettering stage. When my name goes on a book, I don't want my work to be riddled with mistakes--even if they're in the script. It's embarrassing.



Kurt Hathaway
---------------------------------
Cartoon Balloons Studio
---------------------------------
Lettering Logos Pre-Press Graphic Design Video
for Print or Web Entertainment, Advertising or Education!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETGevjPkZso

http://www.cartoon-balloons.com


I will definitely look to fix in the future whenever I get a script. At the time I did this exercise, I just blindly followed script and just made visual changes to text. I agree; it reflects just as badly on letterer since they are the last to handle the text. Thanks for your input.

symulachra
02-04-2015, 11:09 AM
Thank you all for the feedback. Really helpful.

Here's another one from the archives (Hope the tails are a little better. And given the recent feedback, I see now all the grammatical mistakes and the lack of bold. I still want to show as-is to reflect the time when I worked on it before any feedback and see if anything else needs to be addressed):

http://symulachra.deviantart.com/art/Lettering-Sample-6B-507042140

http://th05.deviantart.net/fs71/PRE/i/2015/028/1/1/lettering_sample_6b_by_symulachra-d8dvo7w.png

(hey, bub, right click image, then copy image url, then when on the forum, and posting find the insert image box, right click again and paste. image will appear. - friendly Paul )

paul brian deberry
02-05-2015, 07:35 PM
have to work on your tails, this one is a major step backwards. balloontales.com has an awesome tutorial on making tails. do yourself a favor and go to Youtube and search balloon tutorials.

keep working on it you'll get it.

symulachra
02-13-2015, 11:31 AM
Let me know what you think. Text too small?

http://symulachra.deviantart.com/art/Lettering-Sample-8-508580825

http://fc01.deviantart.net/fs70/i/2015/021/a/5/lettering_sample_8_by_symulachra-d8esnh5.png

Schuyler
02-13-2015, 11:20 PM
I like the sentence case on this one.

Charles
02-14-2015, 09:45 AM
Let me know what you think. Text too small?


Yes, it is too small.

For feedback on art, large images are helpful. They allow closer scrutiny of details.

But, where the reading of comic books is concerned, the true size of the finished product is important. If the eye has to strain, or if the reader has to zoom, in order to make out what the lettering says, then it is problematic.

Furthermore, there is a reason why comic books have traditionally and historically utilized capital letters in lettering. It makes it easier to read.

Schuyler
02-14-2015, 12:37 PM
Yes, it is too small.

For feedback on art, large images are helpful. They allow closer scrutiny of details.

But, where the reading of comic books is concerned, the true size of the finished product is important. If the eye has to strain, or if the reader has to zoom, in order to make out what the lettering says, then it is problematic.

Furthermore, there is a reason why comic books have traditionally and historically utilized capital letters in lettering. It makes it easier to read.

Charles. I have read books with sentence case. For the record, I don't have any problem reading them.

I might be wrong, but I think it is all capitals, because people were lettering by hand. It was much easier to have one of each letter, as opposed to two. Once again, I might be wrong.

symulachra. I think Charles is probably right about size. The image you posted is bigger than a comic book page would be. That makes it hard to determine about size. Also, I know almost nothing about lettering.

Schuyler
02-14-2015, 12:52 PM
The Ames Guide was a simple but powerful tool invented in 1917. With the turn of a dial, this basic device provided an easy way to have straight, evenly spaced letters of any size. It also had an unintentional side effect. You can follow the link to see how it works in detail, but it’s essentially an easy way to insert temporary and consistent guidelines. Because of the way the alphabet works, five lines are required to make lower case letters: one line as an upper boundary, one as a lower boundary, one mid-height line to regulate the tops of smaller letters and features like the hump in an h or b, one sub-boundary to keep letters the descenders of letters like y or j in line, and one additional line below that to provide a space between lines of text. This last line would double as the top boundary in the next set of lines.

Capital letters, on the other hand, are all equal heights and require only three guidelines. The time saved by leaving out the additional lines was valuable, and it didn’t take long for comic strips to almost universally adopt the capital-only approach. By the time comic books first appeared fifteen years later, sentence-case had nearly vanished from the medium.

Much of this sounds like gibberish to me. But, I can get the gist of it. This supports my argument.

Here is a link to the page I got this from.

http://multiversitycomics.com/columns/looking-at-lettering-caps-vs-mixed-case/

I suppose it supports yours as well. But, legibility was not the reason that all caps became the norm.

Charles
02-14-2015, 03:26 PM
I suppose it supports yours as well. But, legibility was not the reason that all caps became the norm.

Well, if a budding letterer wants to standardize an industry, or if they want to save time, then they should go out and grab an Ames Guide.

Of course, other lettering tools exist, today, that didn't exist, back in 1917. Then, again, would an Ames lettering guide save time for a budding digital letterer?

If you take upper case and lower case variants of the same letter, and shrink them for space efficiency's sake, then legibility will begin to be negatively impacted at some point.

Not all lettering is intended to be read, per se, so in those instances, legibility effectively ceases to be an issue. An example of this would be an alien language being spoken or an alien script being read.

The Ames Guide facilitated standards, by becoming a de facto standard, of sorts. Can standards save time? Sure.

But, from a brochure for the Ames Lettering Instrument (which I found on The Tenth Letter of the Alphabet (http://alphabettenthletter.blogspot.com/)) website, a word of advice about lettering can be found:

-------------------------
Work Slowly. Lettering can never be learned by working hurriedly.
-------------------------

SOURCE: http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-pRi8HCWT6S4/UofmYUgftlI/AAAAAAAAVy0/mZCSUCh0gvc/s1600/Ames+Lettering+03.jpg

SOURCE: http://alphabettenthletter.blogspot.com/search/label/Ames%20Lettering%20Guide

Ultimately, the letterer will work within certain space constraints. How they use that white space, how they manipulate it, impacts both the ability of the reader to read their handiwork and the experience that the reader endures.

An upper case letter typically enjoys a de facto advantage, in terms of legibility. Bigger letters can be discerned at further distance. In other words, size matters.

But, other things matter, also, such as font. Just ask the folks at Blambot or Comiccraft. With a better quality font, one can gain increased legibility at decreased size, compared to many other, more "standard" fonts.

If you lose legibility, then it impairs the reader's ability to digest and to appreciate the letterer's contributions to a given comic book.

Good legibility facilitates the flow of text. Size of lettering can impede or facilitate that flow.

One doesn't have to look at just comic books, in order to appreciate the difference that upper case can make, where legibility is concerned. Signs and license tags on automobiles are good ways of testing legibility.

Or, just browse examples of lettering on the websites of letterers. Upper case letters tend to still dominate, and for good reasons, legibility not being the least amongst these.

-------------------------
LOWERCASE
Barring the trend in Marvel comics to use sentence-case fonts on some books, lowercase generally reserved for non-verbal vocalizations like "Uh", "Heh", "Umm", etc. A rule of thumb is that any vocalization that isn't a real word, and is actually more like a noise, should be lowercase. Italicizing in this instance is optional but unnecessary. Occasionally you may see lowercase used as a visual cue indicating someone is whispering.

SOURCE: http://www.blambot.com/grammar.shtml
-------------------------

There's a lot of excellent websites out there that feature examples of good lettering, or have gone to the trouble of writing articles that can be beneficial to becoming a good letterer. Here's a small sample.

http://www.kleinletters.com/index.html

http://www.balloontales.com/articles/beginners/index.html

http://www.balloontales.com/articles/tutorial/part4.html

http://www.balloontales.com/articles/roundtable/

http://clintflickerlettering.blogspot.com/2010/10/youll-have-to-speak-up.html

http://www.artofthecomicbook.com/history/art-reduction.htm

http://www.comicbookfonts.com/

Charles
02-14-2015, 03:26 PM
If you want to go the Ames Guide route, be sure to check this site out:

http://alexandresaintpierre.blogspot.com/2013/12/guidelines.html

Schuyler
02-14-2015, 04:28 PM
I'm not sure what you are trying to say. I never said people should use the Ames guide. I merely pointed out that caps were not traditionally or historically used for the reason that you stated.

Newt
02-14-2015, 04:49 PM
I always understood that all the all-caps convention developed because hand-written caps are more forgiving of sloppy printing on cheap paper (the same reason serif fonts are used in printing). It's less of an issue with modern books or web publishing.

The Ames guide thing makes sense though- it boils down to it being quicker to make three guidelines per line of copy than five guidelines. Time is money, after all! Just to clarify (I use an Ames guide pretty regularly) - you can lay down five guidelines with the Ames as easily as you can three. It just takes 67% more time, as it would with any other method of ruling lines. However, I'm not sure the comic strip artists who developed the all-caps convention were being that careful. Looking at, say, Winsor McCay's lettering (http://www.hoodedutilitarian.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/nemo-1.jpg), it doesn't look like he used any guidelines at all...

Anyhow...Symulachra, I agree that the text is too small in the last one. It looks good to me otherwise, for what its worth. I'm no letterer.

symulachra
02-16-2015, 04:25 PM
Thank you all for chipping in. Interesting chat on lowercase; here's my take:

I don't think it's uncommon to see lowercase in books. A current example, that's quite popular, is the lettering in Saga done by Fonografiks. Imo, lowercase is just another tool that gives a letterer more variety.

To stick with lowercase, here's another sample from the archives. Let me know what you think.

http://th02.deviantart.net/fs71/PRE/i/2015/047/9/9/lettering_sample_13_by_symulachra-d8ht3zj.png

Schuyler
02-16-2015, 04:45 PM
Ooooh, I like it.

This does support what Charles was saying, about sentence case being hard to read.

However, I think it is appropriate to put this story in sentence case. These two people are having an adult conversation, and the sentence case carries that better than caps would.

I don't like this font. I think the font is also making it a bit of an eye strain. Just my opinion, though.

-Sky

symulachra
02-23-2015, 03:04 PM
This is from a short I worked on. Let me know what you guys think.

Episode 1
http://th01.deviantart.net/fs70/PRE/i/2015/040/7/9/lettering_sample_11_by_symulachra-d8hbdey.png

Episode 2
http://th04.deviantart.net/fs70/PRE/i/2015/040/5/9/lettering_sample_12_by_symulachra-d8hbe2i.png


http://symulachra.deviantart.com/art/Lettering-Sample-11-512813482
http://symulachra.deviantart.com/art/Lettering-Sample-12-512814330

Stewart Vernon
02-23-2015, 04:36 PM
I like those shorts... they are cute.

symulachra
07-13-2015, 06:43 PM
Hello. Been a while. I'm currently lettering on 2 books, but it'll be a while since I can show any finished pages. Here's a short I recently worked on though.

Page One (http://symulachra.daportfolio.com/gallery/917651#7)
http://other00.deviantart.net/fc88/o/2015/190/e/9/e9cce35c85a74e3324b55748174795f1.png

Page Two (http://symulachra.daportfolio.com/gallery/917651#8)
http://other00.deviantart.net/72ea/o/2015/190/9/6/96834d3218952ee5a86a2b2db53f7e74.png

I had to end up going with a traditional style for final pages because the creator wasn't a fan of this style. I liked it so I wanted to post it. Let me know what you think.

Stewart Vernon
07-14-2015, 01:39 AM
Maybe some spacing issues (could have used less space than you did) but I see no issues with the font choices there. They seem to fit the style of the story too.

symulachra
12-28-2015, 04:21 PM
Hello. Hope you all are having a great holiday.

I wanted to share some lettering I did a while back as an exercise. Art is by Romain Brun. He posted his original artwork here (http://digitalwebbing.com/forums/showthread.php?t=175548).

There were a few tight spots. Interested to hear what you all think.

One (http://symulachra.deviantart.com/art/Lettering-Sample-21-577967328?q=gallery%3Asymulachra%2F52737277&qo=5)

http://pre14.deviantart.net/5042/th/pre/i/2015/348/9/b/lettering_sample_21_by_symulachra-d9k3ug0.png

Two (http://symulachra.deviantart.com/art/Lettering-Sample-22-577968196?q=gallery%3Asymulachra%2F52737277&qo=4)

http://pre00.deviantart.net/a443/th/pre/i/2015/348/6/2/lettering_sample_22_by_symulachra-d9k3v44.png

Three (http://symulachra.deviantart.com/art/Lettering-Sample-23-577968535?q=gallery%3Asymulachra%2F52737277&qo=3)

http://pre06.deviantart.net/3485/th/pre/i/2015/348/a/1/lettering_sample_23_by_symulachra-d9k3vdj.png

Four (http://symulachra.deviantart.com/art/Lettering-Sample-24-577968793?q=gallery%3Asymulachra%2F52737277&qo=2)

http://pre08.deviantart.net/3712/th/pre/i/2015/348/c/c/lettering_sample_24_by_symulachra-d9k3vkp.png

Five (http://symulachra.deviantart.com/art/Lettering-Sample-25-577969199?q=gallery%3Asymulachra%2F52737277&qo=1)

http://pre12.deviantart.net/a91f/th/pre/i/2015/348/8/a/lettering_sample_25_by_symulachra-d9k3vvz.png

Six (http://symulachra.deviantart.com/art/Lettering-Sample-26-577969433?q=gallery%3Asymulachra%2F52737277&qo=0)

http://pre13.deviantart.net/a973/th/pre/i/2015/348/e/a/lettering_sample_26_by_symulachra-d9k3w2h.png