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View Full Version : Scanning tips!


Joe Simmons
12-09-2014, 12:00 PM
All right artists, tell me how you scan, what settings, how you get rid of blue lines.

I've always scanned as line art but that doesn't seem to be the standard anymore. I get it, I'm old, that's why I'm asking for tips and techniques.

So tell me what you do, this should be a good thread for anyone on the board who needs advice.

khperkins
12-09-2014, 08:10 PM
I scan as color at 600dpi. I take out the blue lines in Photoshop using Image > Adjustments > Black and White and then using the High Contrast Blue Filter from the dropdown. After that I adjust the levels so the blacks and whites look good. Of course there re many other ways to do this, this is just the one I use.

Joe Simmons
12-09-2014, 08:28 PM
I scan as color at 600dpi. I take out the blue lines in Photoshop using Image > Adjustments > Black and White and then using the High Contrast Blue Filter from the dropdown. After that I adjust the levels so the blacks and whites look good. Of course there re many other ways to do this, this is just the one I use.

I've been using Photoshop for 18 years, never used the High Contrast Blue filters. Shows you can use that software for a lifetime and keep learning stuff about it. Very cool, I'm going to try this.

I was having a problem scanning in color, then adjusting it, but it was really chewing up the line art. Not at all happy with it.

Thanks!

UniverseX259
12-10-2014, 03:11 PM
I scan in color at 300-400dpi (Depending on the project). To get rid of blue lines manually I go to Hue/Saturation, select Cyan from the drop down menu, and bring the saturation down to 0 and the lightness up to 100. It gets rid of 95% of the blue lines, and the rest that are there can be easily taken care of with the magic wand tool and the eraser/brush.

If I'm scanning pencils I do all of the above, then set the image to grayscale once the blue is gone. I then go to Curves and adjust it until the whites are white and the grays are dark enough to be read clearly.

As for black and white line art I have a secret weapon that makes my life SO MUCH easier. I forgot where I got it, but it's a pre-made .PSD file where all you have to do is drop the image into it and it's immediately turned into pure black and white. The plus side of this is that it saves a TON of clean-up work. The downside is that sometimes light feathering or ink that's applied below the 50% gray threshold won't show up.

Joe Simmons
12-14-2014, 07:37 PM
I scan in color at 300-400dpi (Depending on the project). To get rid of blue lines manually I go to Hue/Saturation, select Cyan from the drop down menu, and bring the saturation down to 0 and the lightness up to 100. It gets rid of 95% of the blue lines, and the rest that are there can be easily taken care of with the magic wand tool and the eraser/brush.

If I'm scanning pencils I do all of the above, then set the image to grayscale once the blue is gone. I then go to Curves and adjust it until the whites are white and the grays are dark enough to be read clearly.

As for black and white line art I have a secret weapon that makes my life SO MUCH easier. I forgot where I got it, but it's a pre-made .PSD file where all you have to do is drop the image into it and it's immediately turned into pure black and white. The plus side of this is that it saves a TON of clean-up work. The downside is that sometimes light feathering or ink that's applied below the 50% gray threshold won't show up.


Another good tip!
Thanks!!

paul brian deberry
12-14-2014, 08:23 PM
Last edited by Joe Simmons; 12-09-2014 at 07:28 PM. Reason: had to add some words

^i do this all the time^