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Morganza
08-16-2014, 08:50 PM
Not the story. How do you write a plot for a comic? Is there special formatting? All of my plots read like notes, which I pasted together to form a larger story, I would love to see an example of a written plot for a comic, It would help me get on track.

Thanks!

crognus
08-16-2014, 08:59 PM
I don't understand what you mean.

Schuyler
08-16-2014, 09:14 PM
You could try reading Steven's B and N about plotting. It helped me a bit.

Here is what I would do. I would determine what I want to do and how many issues I am going to do it with. Having a definitive end has been extremely helpful for me.

Once I know how many issues and what I am doing I can start to determine what I will do with each issue.

Do you need a plot for multiple issues? Or just one?

If it is just one issue, then it should be easy enough. Here is an example of how I do it.This is an exact plot I sent to Steven over a year ago.

First issue will start with a grave robber who is hiding in a tomb. He has unwittingly woken undead warriors who now seek to destroy him. I only need one page for this. The whole first issue will consist of flashbacks mostly.

The grave robber will recall how he found the skull. Two to four pages.

The skull will talk about the Mystiker and how he became a skull. Four to six pages.

The grave robber will tell how he became a grave robber. Four to six pages.

The rest will tell how the skull and grave robber ended up in the tomb surrounded by undead warriors. Ending with the death of my grave robber. Three to five pages.

I do not have names for either the skull or the robber yet.

Schuyler
08-16-2014, 09:16 PM
It is basically a simple story breakdown with estimates of how many pages you will use to make it happen.

Morganza
08-16-2014, 09:30 PM
Thank you that was helpful!

crognus
08-16-2014, 09:30 PM
Oh. Ya. I tended to hand write that. Because it's just notes for yourself (and maybe the editor), I don't think most people have a "format" for it. Write it out in whatever way works best for you.

As Schuyler said, Steven's Week 2 B&N (http://www.comixtribe.com/2011/01/04/bn-week-2-plotting/) was on plotting. It has an example.

Morganza
08-16-2014, 09:36 PM
Thanks for the link Crognus, I'm reading it now!

AmitMosheOren
08-17-2014, 07:05 AM
I'm not a published comic book writer, so I give my self a creative freedom with this. It sometimes can be just a short story or a one-shot or a three issues mini-series or a six issues mini-series etc... But I prefer to start from small. I wrote a bunch of short stories first time I got started, then I wrote a one-shot, and then a mini-series... you get the picture.

paul brian deberry
08-17-2014, 12:48 PM
With a plot, I just write all the major points within the story.

The catch is getting those notes to make sense for a publisher to understand.

Here's an unedited example of one of my plots.

This is taken from issue four of Jaguar: Man Of Paradox

#4 The shuttlepod crashes! There is no signs of survivors at first. Then out of the wreckage walks Jaguar dragging Nami. Jaguar and his heroes return back to the domed city. The captured Sea Lord signals an end to the war beneath the waves. This does not please Josef as he watches the domed city celebrate. Josef decides that he will make an appearance during the celebration. To Josef dismay no one fears him or shows him the proper respect of his position. Josef orders his Masters to attack Jaguar and his friends. While Jaguar, Skye Captain, Oka and a few of his fighters battle the Masters. K’rs confronts Josef! A one sided battle between the two ends with K’rs appearing to be killed by Josef. The heroes led by Jaguar attack Josef, but Josef has made his point and leaves as easily as he appeared. The city still under siege from the Masters leaves very little time for the group to mourn K’rs apparent death. END

JennaP
08-17-2014, 12:57 PM
I'd show you an example, but all of mine are currently locked down under NDAs.

But what I recommend is that you quickly describe what happens in each "issue" of your story. If doing a GN, split it into 25 page or so chunks. Deberry does it about the way I do.

Morganza
08-17-2014, 02:12 PM
Thanks for the help!

How about this, how do you write a plot for another writer to use.

My plot has a lot of info in it, does it matter how much I put in?

Schuyler
08-17-2014, 02:50 PM
I would say more info is better. The more they know about what you want, the more likely they will give it to you.

crognus
08-17-2014, 02:52 PM
If you are working with another writer, I would include all the information you want in the story. Just make it clear so they don't misinterpret what you want. I think you may be over thinking it a little.

crognus
08-17-2014, 03:33 PM
I would loosely layout at least the first arc (for the first few issues) with the writer. If there are any twist elements that will come up, even if it isn't in the first issue I might tell the writer (but make him/her sign a non-disclosure agreement). That way you can make sure there is proper foreshadowing, etc.

Then I would break down exactly what happens in the first issue, what scenes you want, etc. Whether you want to lay it out page by page (like Steven's example plot), or just write a few paragraphs (like Paul) is up to you. It depends how far you want the writer to stick their hands in your project.

LukePierce
08-19-2014, 05:40 AM
I just write down a quick prose of what I want the story to be about:

Ex: A fairy and a man fall in love. They overcome this by the man making his wish to be able to grant the wish of the fairy.

I then have a think about the obstacles that they would need to overcome to achieve this.

Ex: They love each other, but how do they overcome the obvious size difference? Could there be a fairy Queen who would disapprove and the man needs to prove himself?

Then I think about some other elements:

Ex: How do they meet? What causes them to fall in love? Why do they persist, despite the obvious reasons? How do they initially start the relationship and try to "normalise" it as best they can for what suits them?

I always like to have a clear idea of the ending before working out a clear path to that ending. In order to create the conflict and, therefore the interest, how can I then start wrecking that path to make it as hard as possible for them to reach that goal?

I don't know if that helps at all, but I hope sharing how I approach stories assists you in some way.

Robert_S
08-19-2014, 11:26 AM
I tend to something like:


Scene 1

plot point (topic of discussion, event, etc)
plot point
plot point

Scene 2

plot point
.
.
.



It may help that you put in a brief scene description: place, characters involved.

Morganza
08-19-2014, 11:54 AM
I just write down a quick prose of what I want the story to be about:

Ex: A fairy and a man fall in love. They overcome this by the man making his wish to be able to grant the wish of the fairy.

I then have a think about the obstacles that they would need to overcome to achieve this.

Ex: They love each other, but how do they overcome the obvious size difference? Could there be a fairy Queen who would disapprove and the man needs to prove himself?

Then I think about some other elements:

Ex: How do they meet? What causes them to fall in love? Why do they persist, despite the obvious reasons? How do they initially start the relationship and try to "normalise" it as best they can for what suits them?

I always like to have a clear idea of the ending before working out a clear path to that ending. In order to create the conflict and, therefore the interest, how can I then start wrecking that path to make it as hard as possible for them to reach that goal?

I don't know if that helps at all, but I hope sharing how I approach stories assists you in some way.

That is helpful, I appreciate it!

Lovecraft13
08-19-2014, 12:15 PM
For plot, you could use the old standard:

-Rising Action
-Climax
-Falling Action
-Resolution

If you ever have trouble, write out the plot to your favorite comic book story. It does help to reverse engineer.

Morganza
08-19-2014, 12:37 PM
For plot, you could use the old standard:

-Rising Action
-Climax
-Falling Action
-Resolution

If you ever have trouble, write out the plot to your favorite comic book story. It does help to reverse engineer.

That's a cool idea, going to try that, thanks!

Robert_S
08-19-2014, 07:00 PM
For plot, you could use the old standard:

-Rising Action
-Climax
-Falling Action
-Resolution


The problem I have with the rising/falling part is a lack of quantification. How do you determine if a subsequent scene has more tension than the previous? If the pacing isn't right, you could end up dragging it out or forcing it.


McGee had another abstraction in his book, detailing the disparity between expected results to an action and actual results, but that could lead to making a lead that looks like a bumbling fool for constantly getting it wrong and only stumbling into getting it right in the end.