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jeffo46
06-18-2014, 06:01 PM
This is a test plot which I am trying out in order to stretch my muscles as a writer. This is new territory for me since I'm a artist and want to try my hand at writing. I hope this passes muster and would appreciate any advice you can give me, thanks.

The Amazing Spider-Man

“ Hysteria Personified ! “

Page 1.
Make this a full page shot of a party at the Daily Bugle with the usual staffers like Robbie E. Robertson, Jolly Jonah , Betty Brant, and make sure you have Peter Parker at the forefront with a glass of punch or whatever in his hand. They're celebrating X-Mas Eve so make sure the room is decorated accordingly with mistletoe, decorations, etc. Also show Peter with his Spider sense going off as well.

Page 2.
1st Panel
Have a medium shot of some armed henchmen crashing through the door where the party is being held with the door being thrown off it's hinges .

2nd Panel
Show all of the guests in shock as if they saw a ghost ! Experiment with this one if you want but make it emotional to the viewer.
3rd Panel
Make this one a size page of the Joker strolling in nochalantly as if nothing is going on and of course he has a wide grin on his face.
4th Panel
Another size panel of both JJ Jameson and Peter Parker looking at each other and muttering “ What is the Joker doing here in NYC ? “

Page 3.
1st Panel
A long shot of JJ Jameson gesturing towards the Joker as if he is saying “ what do you want ? We don't give in to criminals over here ! “
2nd Panel
A closeup of the Joker's face . Make sure it looks totally evil but humorous at the same time.
3rd panel
Have the Joker smack the drink out of PP's hand with everybody looking scared. Make this another long shot as well.

4th Panel
Show the Joker's henchmen tossing Peter out of the window while the Joker just stands there and laughs.

5th Panel
Show Peter as he's falling , using his webshooters to quickly swing to the rooftop of the bugle building where he will change into Spider-Man.


Page 4.
Panel 1.
Have a overhead shot of Spidey swinging back towards the Bugle Building.

Panel 2.
While the Joker is bragging about what he's going to do with the Bugle , Spidey comes crashing in through the open window and right away knocks out 2 of the Joker's henchmen. Make this a angle shot with plenty of effects and action.

Panel 3.
Use the rest of the page to show Spidey leapfrogging, etc; while he takes out the rest of the Joker's henchmen. Make it as exciting as possible .

Page 5.
Panel 1.
Show the Joker grabbing JJJ by the back of neck and holding him in a threatening pose with a gun to his head.

Panel 2.
Show JJJ Stomping on The Joker's foot !

Panel 3.
Have Spidey web the Joker's gun and knock him out with a punch !

Panel 4.
Show the NYC Police taking the Joker and his crew to jail while JJJ brags about how he saved the day.
Panel 5
Show JJJ getting a mouthful of webbing.
Panel 6.
Have Spidey swinging off into the NYC skyline.

Robert_S
06-19-2014, 12:51 PM
Is there no dialog intended through this entire piece?

It seems to be happening too fast. The Joker is the typical villain. He loves to speak and show off his supposed madness.


5th Panel
Show Peter as he's falling , using his webshooters to quickly swing to the rooftop of the bugle building where he will change into Spider-Man.


Too much happening here. This is multiple actions in one panel.


Panel 2.
While the Joker is bragging about what he's going to do with the Bugle , Spidey comes crashing in through the open window and right away knocks out 2 of the Joker's henchmen. Make this a angle shot with plenty of effects and action.


Same. Too much happening in one panel.


Page 5.
Panel 1.
Show the Joker grabbing JJJ by the back of neck and holding him in a threatening pose with a gun to his head.


Again. Instead, have Joker "holding" JJ by the back of the neck with a gun pointed at his head.

Duane Korslund
06-19-2014, 12:59 PM
Think of each panel as a single photograph you're snapping of a scene...you cant have the characters doing more actions than they would be capable of doing in a single snapshot.

Steven Forbes
06-19-2014, 01:13 PM
Here's the problem, Jeff:

You're calling this a plot, but then you went and described it panel by panel. That's chocolate and cyanide.

If you're going to call it a plot, do a plot of the entire page, but don't break it down by panel. This gives the artist the freedom to pace it the way they want to, and will allow them to choose their own camera angles as well. Doing it the way you have it means you're writing moving panels. (We won't get into the lack of studying how to write for comics. That's a different discussion altogether.)

Robert: a script doesn't need dialogue. Full script, sure, but for a plot, no dialogue is needed. The writer will plot out the issue and hand it to the artist. The artist will then draw the pages and give it back to the writer, who will then write the dialogue based on the plot written and how the art came out. Then it'll go to the letterer. (The colorist is in there somewhere--it depends on whether or not there will even be a colorist, and if there's an inker.)

jeffo46
06-19-2014, 02:04 PM
This is the 1st time I ever tried this and all of the tips which you all have given me , are very much appreciated and will be put to good use when I attempt to write another plot/script. These tips which you all have given me are very helpful. Thank you all very much.

Robert_S
06-19-2014, 04:34 PM
The writer will plot out the issue and hand it to the artist. The artist will then draw the pages and give it back to the writer, who will then write the dialogue based on the plot written and how the art came out. Then it'll go to the letterer. (The colorist is in there somewhere--it depends on whether or not there will even be a colorist, and if there's an inker.)

Is that the industry standard way of doing it or one of many? Because I simply can't imagine separating panels from dialog anymore than I could separate scene from dialog. I have to write it out fully. If the penciler/artist wants only the scenes, I'd have to do extra work to separate them.

Steven Forbes
06-19-2014, 04:40 PM
Is that the industry standard way of doing it or one of many? Because I simply can't imagine separating panels from dialog anymore than I could separate scene from dialog. I have to write it out fully. If the penciler/artist wants only the scenes, I'd have to do extra work to separate them.

There are two basic ways of scripting.

The Marvel method/plot first, and full script.

Read this.
(http://www.comixtribe.com/2011/02/08/bn-week-7-scripting-methods/)