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View Full Version : How do you feel about posting scripts?


scrappy
07-07-2013, 11:00 AM
I know this forum isn't typically for stuff like this, but I wanted to get people's opinions on this subject. I'm fairly new to writing comics and obviously I want all the feedback I can get (both on my script format and the story itself). But I feel like posting a raw script is throwing the idea out there for people to adopt for themselves and use any way they want. I know its part of the deal, but I'm kind of torn between wanting feedback and exposing my ideas.

I'm probably going to post it at some point because I know it'll probably never be a problem. It's just my overly cautious imagination. But I just wanted to hear what people had to say on the matter first.

Lovecraft13
07-07-2013, 02:43 PM
Posting online will get you a thousand ambiguous or generic responses from a variety of people who don't have your best interests in mind. And while you might approach message boards for positive feedback, you'll either sour on the negative responses or become discouraged by the lack of any responses.

Approach the smartest person you know, and ask him or her for help.

If you're looking for something more specific, like script format, then message boards would be ideal. While many formats vary, you'll get informed responses and links to online sources.

Don't worry about protecting your ideas. Whatever they are, someone already beat you to the punch. The only difference is they probably never finished the project. Be the person who does.

Still. If you're still worried about stolen ideas, don't post your work online.

Steven Forbes
07-07-2013, 06:13 PM
There are a few ways to approach this, and I'm going to go over them from least expensive to most expensive.

The first way is to do nothing. Just keep your ideas to yourself and develop them the best way you know how. I don't recommend this option.

You could take Lovecraft's advice and approach the smartest person you know, but that doesn't mean they know comics. Since you know them, that means they fall into the "friends and family" category of people who care about you and your feelings, which means that on top of not knowing what they're looking at, they also don't want to hurt your feelings if what they see isn't good.

Next, we have message boards. Like Lovecraft said, they're full of people who'll look and possibly not comment, or if they comment, they won't be all that helpful. There are few helpful posters on this site anymore. I used to be one of them, but I've been tied up doing my own thing (which I'll come to next). You cannot look to message boards for guaranteed comments on your script.

Your next option is to submit to The Proving Grounds over at ComixTribe (http://www.comixtribe.com/). Every week, two editors (myself and another) go over a script, practically line by line, saying what was and wasn't good. This, like posting on a message board, is put out there for the world to see, but it is never an entire script (unless it's a short story, and by short, I mean 5-8 pages or so). This is the only place I know of where two editors are looking over your script and where you're guaranteed to get feedback. Just follow the rules (http://www.comixtribe.com/columns/the-proving-grounds/submit/), and you'll be fine. I also suggest reading a couple of them first, to see what you're getting yourself into.

All of these options are free. The only thing you have to do is be brave enough to put yourself out there. Like Lovecraft said, don't worry about the story idea. More than likely someone has already done it and put it out into the world as a completed comic. Don't let that discourage you. There are few ideas out there that are so great and spectacular that another writer would want to steal them. More than likely, the writer was already working on something similar. (This has happened to me plenty of times.)

Your next option is to hire an editor. Whenever you get serious about creating, I always advocate hiring a good, competent editor. Yes, I'm an editor, and while some see the above statement as self-serving (and it is, just a bit), it's also true. Honestly, I don't care if you hire me or not. There isn't a writer alive that couldn't use a competent editor to keep them on task or help them look at something in a new way in order to effectively tell the story. The editor is a safety net: we're there if you need us. It's been my experience that most new writers need us.

What this does for you is it keeps your script/project private until you're ready to release it to the world. However, this is not a free service. A good, competent editor wants to be compensated for their time. Hence, the word "hire."

Those are your options. I'm available and taking on clients. If you want to reach me to talk about it more, I'm stevedforbes (at) gmail ((dot)) com.

No matter what you decide, welcome to the community, and good luck in your endeavors.

-Steven

scrappy
07-08-2013, 07:53 PM
Thank you, Steven. That was a helpful post. One question: does the editor strictly work on the writing process, or can the editor also help with getting the script published or created(drawn)? Kind of like an agent/manager or producer for a film. I'm just asking because I would imagine if an editor is offering their services for hire, then that would mean they would more than likely have experience in some professional capacity. And they would have contacts and expertise in the process. Just wondering. Thanks again and I will definitely be checking ComixTribe out.

Scribbly
07-08-2013, 08:37 PM
The thing is, you have an script to post, post an excerpt ( 5 to 10 first pages) of your script so everybody can see what are you cooking.
And what level of writing skills you may have.
Get critics or oblivion.
You are not sure, keep practicing and pay somebody for help you on improve your writing. IMHO.

Steven Forbes
07-08-2013, 10:15 PM
Thank you, Steven. That was a helpful post. One question: does the editor strictly work on the writing process, or can the editor also help with getting the script published or created(drawn)? Kind of like an agent/manager or producer for a film. I'm just asking because I would imagine if an editor is offering their services for hire, then that would mean they would more than likely have experience in some professional capacity. And they would have contacts and expertise in the process. Just wondering. Thanks again and I will definitely be checking ComixTribe out.

I offer two different kinds of services.

The first service is just working with the script so that it can be something that can be produced. You'd be surprised at how often this is not the case.

The second service I offer is project management. This, of course, is more expensive. With this, after I help you with the script, I help you find a creative team, manage them in the production of the comic, and then point you in the direction of possible publishers.

Understand this: no freelance editor can guarantee publication with a publisher. If they say they can, they lied to you in an effort to get your money. Be aware of that.

The editor's role is simply this: to help creators make the best comic within the creator's capabilities. If the best comic you can make is a riff on The Little Mermaid, but you have watercolored stick figures instead of more traditional art, then my job is going to be that much more difficult.

Also understand that you get what you pay for.

Hope that helps.

-Steven