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Ace Corona
04-25-2013, 01:36 AM
I watched a tutorial the other day on how to letter and make dialogue balloons in Manga Studio, and today I got off my lazy ass and opened Manga Studio and tried it out on a Mary Marvel drawing I did in January, and I succeeded in making a short text with speech balloon. I had tried and failed at other times several months ago and gave up, but tonight I succeeded. It isn't as complicated as I had at first thought.

I have a quick question about the blue construction lines surrounding the text and the speech balloon, I noticed that when I closed Manga Studio and brought up the Mary Marvel drawing, the blue construction lines were gone. Are they only there in Manga Studio so we can edit them?

Another quick question, There is a writer/artist named Giselle Lagace who pencils and does the lettering and speech balloons for her webcomic "Eerie Cuties" and I've seen some complex speech balloons, and after e-mailing her a while back she said she opens another layer when making those complex speech balloons, but she was vague and didn't specify how.

The tutorial I watched covered the very basics of lettering and speech balloons, does anyone know of more advanced tutorials on Youtube (or elsewhere) where I can learn some of the complicated techniques Giselle Lagace uses on Eerie Cuties?

http://i286.photobucket.com/albums/ll98/deucemicro/MaryMarvel01_zps23db2e10.jpg (http://s286.photobucket.com/user/deucemicro/media/MaryMarvel01_zps23db2e10.jpg.html)

JimCampbell
04-25-2013, 02:42 AM
I believe balloon creation in Manga Studio is relatively easy, but actual text handling and typesetting is horrible. There are literally no professional letterers using MS, and I say that as a professional letterer and huge Manga Studio fan…!

Cheers

Jim

Ace Corona
04-25-2013, 02:49 AM
I believe balloon creation in Manga Studio is relatively easy, but actual text handling and typesetting is horrible. There are literally no professional letterers using MS, and I say that as a professional letterer and huge Manga Studio fan…!

Cheers

Jim

Giselle Lagace uses it exclusively with Eerie Cuties, she does great work with it. Does lettering with Adobe Illustrator really deliver a better product?

khperkins
04-25-2013, 09:35 AM
I've tried lettering in MS several times, and always go back to Illustrator. I can't get past the way MS adjusts the balloons to the text, whether you want it to or not (I suppose I could just hand draw the balloons to alleviate that problem). The font selection and typesetting tools are just horrible though. I can do everything else in MS and love it, but lettering just isn't there for me in MS4, anyways. Waiting for MS5 EX to come out so I can check it out, though.

Piekos
04-25-2013, 09:35 AM
I'll second what Jim said, and add:

Manga Studio does not support Opentype Autoligs as far as I know. I often get emails from people using MS asking why their autoligs aren't working.

~N

L Jamal
04-25-2013, 09:48 AM
Illustrator is a much better product.
If you have access to Illustrator then I would recommend using it.
Otherwise, utilize what you have.

Ace Corona
04-25-2013, 11:00 AM
I'll second what Jim said, and add:

Manga Studio does not support Opentype Autoligs as far as I know. I often get emails from people using MS asking why their autoligs aren't working.

~N

What are autoligs? The regular fonts work okay though, don't they?

JimCampbell
04-25-2013, 11:31 AM
Waiting for MS5 EX to come out so I can check it out, though.

PJ Holden tells me it's still horrible. He thinks the colouring tools are now good enough to make dropping Photoshop out of your workflow a distinct possibility, but that lettering is still a dog…

Cheers

Jim

JimCampbell
04-25-2013, 11:35 AM
I'll second what Jim said, and add:
Manga Studio does not support Opentype Autoligs as far as I know. I often get emails from people using MS asking why their autoligs aren't working.

I also believe as a hangover from its Japanese origins, it only applies faux italics rather than using the actual italic version of the font (ISTR reading somewhere that there's no such thing as italics in Japanese scripts).

Cheers

Jim

PC812
05-28-2013, 02:23 AM
I also believe as a hangover from its Japanese origins, it only applies faux italics rather than using the actual italic version of the font (ISTR reading somewhere that there's no such thing as italics in Japanese scripts).

Coming to an old thread here, but you're absolutely right about this. I live and work in Japan, sometimes use Japanese on my computer, and while I can bold and underline to my heart's content, I can't italicize.

digiwombat
05-29-2013, 03:38 AM
MangaStudio is fantastic for lettering if you really just want to put balloons on a page and have letters inside those balloons and do so quickly. The moment you try to do anything even remotely interesting, you will hit six or seven walls.

I can certainly see an artist who is doing all of a webcomic themselves using it gleefully (especially a SFX light or bare manga-style webcomic like Eerie Cuties), and if that is what you're going for, it might work just fine for you. It holds your hand in a ton of ways and it's incredibly fast. But what you get in quick balloon lettering, you lose in flexibility.

I started out in MangaStudio for a few pages and I felt like a master. Then I went to Illustrator and felt like an idiot. But an idiot who was looking up at the glorious Mount Starkings that, should I reach the summit, I would be A GOD AMONG MEN. And now I'm nearly as quick with Illustrator as I was with MangaStudio and I feel 100 times as dynamic and capable. It lets me do things I never even conceived of in MangaStudio.

And this is coming from an insanely lazy writer who took up lettering to save money on his own books. I'm far from an expert, but believe me: Illustrator is streets ahead. It'll make you feel magical. In your heart.

JimCampbell
05-29-2013, 05:58 AM
MangaStudio is fantastic for lettering if you really just want to put balloons on a page and have letters inside those balloons and do so quickly.

Sadly, there are people who think this is an acceptable approach to lettering. I don't understand it — artists who are awful inkers don't say "Oh, well, the inks are shit but we'll publish it anyway",* they get an inker in to make a better job of it.

Comics are words created by the writer and pictures created by the artist and the lettering is what ties them together. In a way, it's the most important part of creating a comic strip!

Cheers

Jim




*Well, yes, clearly there are some, but you see my point.

digiwombat
05-30-2013, 08:30 AM
Comics are words created by the writer and pictures created by the artist and the lettering is what ties them together. In a way, it's the most important part of creating a comic strip.

Absolutely.

Good lettering is one of those things I think people don't really appreciate until they don't have it. I know I was probably guilty of not giving enough respect to the creativity and ingenuity of letterers in the digital age until I started doing it myself. On the plus side, however, I have a WHOLE new appreciation of every comic book I pick up that I didn't have before.

I've come to think of it like a good bass-line in music. In the right hands, it's never boring or plain and it melds perfectly with the rest of the band.