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CHWolf
11-12-2012, 02:51 AM
"Experienced/older character trapped in dull life undergoes task/journey with inexperienced/younger character who annoys them." - Every Pixar Film Ever



Toy Story:
Old toy who's never left Andy threatened by newer/fancier toy who repeatedly insists he's not a toy, they have an adventure.

A Bug's Life:
An ant who doesn't fit in within a colony on an island(!) meets a group of insane performers and mistakes them for (experienced) warriors, which they are not. They have an adventure.

Monsters Inc.:
Experienced monsters who have never questioned their corporate master(s) vexed by stray child who won't stay put, they have an adventure.

Finding Nemo:
Clownfish with dark history is afraid to leave home, meets constantly inexperienced (no history) surgeonfish who constantly says the same things, they have an adventure.

Incredibles:
A fantastic duo of experienced crimefighters, trapped in dull "normal" lives have an annoying, hyper son and a sad-sack monotone daughter, they have an adventure.

Cars:
I didn't see this.

Ratatouille:
A rat who's well-versed in the art of cuisine leaves the small cottage he and his family seem to have inhabited for generations, meets a young, inexperienced, bumbling chef, and they have an adventure.

Wall-E:
An ages-old robot that lives in a hoarder's paradise and spends every day doing the same useless task meets a newer robot unfamiliar with Earth and (annoyingly) doesn't reciprocate his affections. They have an adventure.

Up:
An elderly man who's lived in the same house/neighborhood for his whole life is pestered by an eager young scout, they have an adventure.

Brave:
Didn't care to see this one, either.


And that brings us to...


Wreck-It Ralph:
A bruiser from a retro (old) game is tired of going through the motions of the same gameplay, he meets an annoying young girl. They pretty much have an adventure.


Badump-bump.

So now you have everything you need to write your own Pixar-styled plot synopsis.

"A(n) ______ who is tired of ______ goes on a journey to ______. Along the way, he/she meets a(n) irritating ________ who constantly ________!"



Example:

A SNOWMAN who is tired of BEING BUILT IN THE SAME YARD EVERY YEAR goes on a journey to FIND THE NORTH POLE. Along the way, he meets an irritating REINDEER who constantly HAS HIS NOSE LIGHT UP AND BUZZ WHEN THERE'S TENSION!

An ELEPHANT who is tired of LIVING IN THE ZOO goes on a journey to FIND HIS TRAVELING CIRCUS PARENTS. Along the way, he meets an irritating PETTING ZOO GOAT who constantly LEAPS UP AND PERCHES ON ANYTHING TALL!

Co.Inkadink
11-12-2012, 05:35 AM
Who do you think you are?

Biofungus
11-12-2012, 10:50 AM
Dory was a Regal Tang specifically.

Also, there's a reason it's called, "The Pixar Formula" and why all their movies are compared to it (not to mention more than a few competitor studios movies).

Comix Obsession
11-12-2012, 11:03 AM
A good attempt, but I don't think some of them fit, and you're definitely straining on a couple (not to mention you haven't see every Pixar film).

It is an interesting formula, though, I certainly hadn't noticed it. Kudos to them for telling so many stories with such a simple premise. Pixar are awesome.

CHWolf
11-12-2012, 02:58 PM
I'm not straining any of them. Every single one I wrote about has a knowledgeable, experienced, and/or older character going on a journey/task with an unknowledgable*, inexperienced, and/or younger character.

*If "unknowledgable" was a word.


Sometimes the character is older and more experienced in the world, other times if they're sheltered, they're a genius of some sort, be it cooking or inventing, etc.


I think your previously stated position that people shouldn't look into "innocent" movies is coloring your reading of it.


Bio: It might've been a Surgeon Fish in that french children's book, then. My badz.

ld-airgrafix
11-12-2012, 03:46 PM
Isn't every movie, someone meets someone and they go on an adventure, whether its love, funny, horror adventure and so on.
Love cars

Co.Inkadink
11-12-2012, 03:53 PM
What gives you the right?

Biofungus
11-12-2012, 05:11 PM
CHW: I wasn't correcting per se, just that surgeonfish is kind of a 'catch all' term that encompasses tangs, as well as several other families of fish (it refers to the razor sharp spines on their backs).

Also, if you apply that formula to other animated movies that were successful but weren't Pixar produced, you'll see the ones that were the most well received tended to follow a similar formula.

Also, CH isn't the only one to notice this trend. Just google "Pixar formula" and there's a bunch of articles like this.
http://www.televisionwithoutpity.com/mwop/moviefile/2009/05/up-solving-the-pixar-formula-f.php

Co.Inkadink
11-12-2012, 05:49 PM
All these movies are completely original and unique to each other.

Moonrider
11-12-2012, 08:30 PM
I wouldn't call it 'formula', I'd say it's more like a theme. I think the common theme in Pixar films is basically communication between generations, and that's why Pixar films are highly entertaining. It brings the young and old together to the theater because the stories reflect to both generations.

CHWolf
11-12-2012, 08:31 PM
While I agree that plenty of films from plenty of companies have the same elements, Pixar is unique in that it (almost?) uses the same list of elements in every film made under their name.

For example, I watched Rapunzel. Deal with it, bitches. Anyway, while the film had an experienced/older character, the other character, the younger one, was stuck in a dull routine and annoyed the other. So it's jumbled. Pixar uses the same themes in the same way. That's essentially my point.

With the possible exception of Brave and Cars, I can truthfully say "Every Pixar film has a knowledgable character stuck in a rut who meets an annoying (to them) unknowledgable character and goes on an adventure."

You can't swap any other name in there in place of "Pixar" and have it still be true. That says something, even though it doesn't lessen the quality of the films.

Co.Inkadink - Stop trying to start a fight over animated movies.

Biofungus
11-12-2012, 08:49 PM
When I mentioned other company's successful films using similar formulas, I had "How to Train Your Dragon" in mind, but now that I think about it, Shrek, Kung Fu Panda, Bolt, Ice Age, Monsters vs. Aliens... So many really.

CHWolf
11-12-2012, 09:48 PM
They don't fit Pixar's model, though...

How to Train Your Dragon: Young man stuck in rut meets experienced dragon and annoys it. All jumbled.

Shrek: Not trapped in a rut, loved every disgusting minute of it.

Kung-Fu Panda, I haven't cared to see.

Bolt: Arguably not trapped in a rut, and happy if he'd never left it. AFAIK, more annoying to his experienced cat compatriot than the other way around, so it doesn't fit. One could argue the hamster was the annoying/unknowledgable one, but I didn't really see him bothering the lead character.

Ice Age: Was anyone stuck in a rut in the first place? I don't see how this fits at all other than one character being annoying, and them all going on a journey.

Monsters vs. Aliens, same as Kung-Fu Panda.



That's what makes a formula a formula... the formula of it. If that makes any sense the way I put it.

If we throw away the necessary key elements of the formula and even just go for a few, then sure, every story ever is similar.


Toy Story is like SAW in that case, because people/toys get disassembled.


*shrug*

Comix Obsession
11-13-2012, 07:52 AM
I'm not straining any of them. Every single one I wrote about has a knowledgeable, experienced, and/or older character going on a journey/task with an unknowledgable*, inexperienced, and/or younger character.

*If "unknowledgable" was a word.


Sometimes the character is older and more experienced in the world, other times if they're sheltered, they're a genius of some sort, be it cooking or inventing, etc.

I disagree, you are straining on a couple.

The Incredibles:
A fantastic duo of experienced crimefighters, trapped in dull "normal" lives have an annoying, hyper son and a sad-sack monotone daughter, they have an adventure.

The son and daughter aren't the reason the adventure starts. A better summary for this film would be:

The father of a family of superheroes, forced to hide their powers from the World, grows weary of his situation and seeks out excitement, inadvertently propelling himself and his family into an adventure.

Finding Nemo:
Clownfish with dark history is afraid to leave home, meets constantly inexperienced (no history) surgeonfish who constantly says the same things, they have an adventure.

Again, it's straining to make the formula fit (though I won't disagree that the elements are there). I'd argue that Finding Nemo is more like this:

A clownfish, afraid of the World after a traumatic incident, is forced to leave his comfort zone when his son is kidnapped, and embarks upon a wild adventure.

Brave might actually be the first film that doesn't follow this formula. Funnily enough, whilst the look of it is absolutely stunning, it might actually be their weakest film.

I think your previously stated position that people shouldn't look into "innocent" movies is coloring your reading of it.

I still stand by that, to some degree. Have you ever hung around with film students, or studied something you love? It's not very fun when people rip apart things for little to no reason. Not that I think that's what you're doing, but it's similar.

While I agree that plenty of films from plenty of companies have the same elements, Pixar is unique in that it (almost?) uses the same list of elements in every film made under their name.

Disney?

Co.Inkadink - Stop trying to start a fight over animated movies.

Agreed, but are you implying animated movies are less of an art form?

Kung-Fu Panda, I haven't cared to see.

Monsters vs. Aliens, same as Kung-Fu Panda.

If you like animated movies (it seems like you do), then 'Kung Fu Panda' is worth checking out. I dismissed it (weirdly, since I love both Kung Fu and animated movies) originally, but now I'm a huge fan. The sequel is even better. How to Train Your Dragon was the surprise film for me, more than any other. One of the best animated films I've seen.

Co.Inkadink
11-13-2012, 08:06 AM
Co.Inkadink - Stop trying to start a fight over animated movies.
Good day Sir!

I SAID GOOD DAY!

Biofungus
11-13-2012, 02:14 PM
I disagree, you are straining on a couple.

The Incredibles:
A fantastic duo of experienced crimefighters, trapped in dull "normal" lives have an annoying, hyper son and a sad-sack monotone daughter, they have an adventure.

The son and daughter aren't the reason the adventure starts. A better summary for this film would be:

The father of a family of superheroes, forced to hide their powers from the World, grows weary of his situation and seeks out excitement, inadvertently propelling himself and his family into an adventure.

AKA Father stuck in a rut, adventure calls, inexperienced kids

Finding Nemo:
Clownfish with dark history is afraid to leave home, meets constantly inexperienced (no history) surgeonfish who constantly says the same things, they have an adventure.

Again, it's straining to make the formula fit (though I won't disagree that the elements are there). I'd argue that Finding Nemo is more like this:

A clownfish, afraid of the World after a traumatic incident, is forced to leave his comfort zone when his son is kidnapped, and embarks upon a wild adventure.

Aka father stuck in a rut, adventure calls (main difference is this is a 'required' adventure rather than the "purposely leapt into" adventure of the Incredibles), inexperienced sidekick fish

Brave might actually be the first film that doesn't follow this formula. Funnily enough, whilst the look of it is absolutely stunning, it might actually be their weakest film.

Aka female 'princess-esque' type character stuck in a rut, adventure calls (this time it's a bit of both, leapt into willingly but also required), inexperienced Mom sidekick (in the form of a bear)

I don't normally agree with CHWolf, but the thing is even Pixar creators have commented on this Pixar formula. In fact they even have something akin to a Ven Diagram/chart for it! It was seen in the extras on at least one of their movies (I'm thinking the Incredibles, because I rarely watch the extras but I think that was one of the few I did watch some of).

Biofungus
11-13-2012, 02:32 PM
They don't fit Pixar's model, though...

How to Train Your Dragon: Young man stuck in rut meets experienced dragon and annoys it. All jumbled.

This one deviates a little in that we see the hero become the experienced one. (the dragon is just as inexperienced as he is, they both grow together). The adventure is obvious, but the inexperience comes from the other vikings (both the kids learning to fight dragons, and the adults who stick to the old ways before learning the "proper" ways of dragon husbandry).


Shrek: Not trapped in a rut, loved every disgusting minute of it.

Again, slight variation. You may not call it a rut, but it's just the more pleasant version (a stuck in his comfort zone, if you will). Because of Farquad, the fairy tale creatures invade his swamp and he has to do something about it (adventure calling), inexperienced Donkey sidekick.

Kung-Fu Panda, I haven't cared to see.

This one mostly follows the Dreamworks "formula" seen in How to Train your Dragon. It's almost the same as the Pixar formula, with the twist that the hero starts off inexperienced, but grows to become the experienced one (it's inevitable that this hero winds up 'teaching a lesson' to a character (or characters) that were previous thought to be the more experienced ones).

Bolt: Arguably not trapped in a rut, and happy if he'd never left it. AFAIK, more annoying to his experienced cat compatriot than the other way around, so it doesn't fit. One could argue the hamster was the annoying/unknowledgable one, but I didn't really see him bothering the lead character.

Bolt is stuck in a TV show that he thinks is real, aka rut (or again, the 'comfort zone') thing. Adventure comes calling. Again, he starts off as the inexperienced one and winds up becoming experienced along the way.

Ice Age: Was anyone stuck in a rut in the first place? I don't see how this fits at all other than one character being annoying, and them all going on a journey.

They were ALL stuck in a rut. Manny the unusually solo mammoth (also more or less the wise/experienced one who helps teach the others). Sid, his own kind not being able to stand him (and the ultimate result of that prompting his incursion into the adventure), Diego doing what he generally does for his pack (food scout), gets sucked into the adventure initially out of revenge, but ultimately to do what he was always doing. Then adventure calls. Sid obviously inexperienced, but Diego too, to an extent.

Monsters vs. Aliens, same as Kung-Fu Panda.
And virtually the same formula applies as I stated above, too.



That's what makes a formula a formula... the formula of it. If that makes any sense the way I put it.

Coke is a formula too, and then there's Cherry Coke, Vanilla Coke, etc. IOW, the formula isn't negated by the addition of certain elements. It's built upon, but it's still there. Notice when you subtract from the original formula, then it starts to change because you're not working with the basic foundation any longer (this applies to soda as well as movies).

If we throw away the necessary key elements of the formula and even just go for a few, then sure, every story ever is similar.

If you break the foundation, then the similarities are merely plot points, not structurally.

Jasen Smith
11-13-2012, 06:15 PM
"CHWolf who is tired of Pixar, goes on a journey to give them a bad name. Along the way, he/she meets a(n) irritating Justice41 who constantly annoys CHWolf!"

Am I doing it right?

Moonrider
11-13-2012, 08:42 PM
"CHWolf who is tired of Pixar, goes on a journey to give them a bad name. Along the way, he/she meets a(n) irritating Justice41 who constantly annoys CHWolf! Also, sodomy."

Am I doing it right?

Fixed it for ya.

CHWolf
11-13-2012, 08:54 PM
I'm just happy people are paying attention to me.