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Adrianna
08-06-2012, 01:49 PM
My first try with traditional inks. wanted to explore it, tried digital but I preferred Traditional. Used Faber-Castell and Steadler pens. took about 6 hours. Printed the pencils out on Bristol board in Cyan, then inked, and scanned back in.

Any pointers from any experienced inkers out there would be much appreciated!

Pencils Mercio Abreu

http://www.deviantart.com/download/319020729/arwyn_by_adriannauk-d59xpyx.jpg

VANDAL
08-06-2012, 03:59 PM
That's a very interesting way to ink over Abreu. His pencils are generally extremely tight but you used a much more loose style in your inks. Your inks do however look surprisingly good although they aren't exactly "comic book" inks. They are much more of an illustrative style. Perhaps you should have used a french curve on her thighs because the lines there are very uneven. You might also want to look into getting a quill pen and a really good brush (I use a Windsor-Newton series 7 number 2 brush).

Adrianna
08-06-2012, 05:49 PM
That's a very interesting way to ink over Abreu. His pencils are generally extremely tight but you used a much more loose style in your inks. Your inks do however look surprisingly good although they aren't exactly "comic book" inks. They are much more of an illustrative style. Perhaps you should have used a french curve on her thighs because the lines there are very uneven. You might also want to look into getting a quill pen and a really good brush (I use a Windsor-Newton series 7 number 2 brush).

Thank you so much for the feedback. Really appreciated. I have French curves, and I also have a second copy of this pin up printed off in case I made a mistake with the first. I also have a quill dip pen I purchased for my art course I am taking at the moment (which is what got me curious about inking in comics in the first place)

I havent got that brush but I will have to wait until pay day to treat my self. Do you only use the number 2 out of interest? I have a number 3 Pro arte brush or number 2 graduate Daler Rowney filbert brush. Not Sable of course, but could I use one of those to pratice in the mean time? I have been spoilt by the Faber Castell Brush pen I must admit :whistlin:

Justice41
08-06-2012, 10:21 PM
Brush pens are for doing con sketches, the ink will turn purple after a few years. Any Number 2 round will do even a liner brush. Calculate how much it will cost to replace a better sable hair in about the same time as it would cost to replace a cheaper #2. Although if you take care of the brush they should last years.
My advice, don't mess around with marker pens or felt tip liner pens as they will not give you a consistent line and you cannot do adequate feathering. If you have to go over and over your lines the lines will end up looking sloppy. You really want to get that line down in one stroke if possible 2 the most or it's gonna wind up wobbly and messy.
If you have a brush try this out. Take some ink and add it to some water not much just enough to make the ink gray. Now start on a piece of scrap paper, laying down long lines as you do, press down a bit at times to create a thick point in the lines do this a few times. As you do the stroke also try to do it in one long flowing stroke. Don't stop. If you have to stop, check the angle of the paper and how you position your arm then try again. Draw a few straight lines down in pencil with a ruler then do the exercise again while trying to stay on the ruled lines. Try this as well, draw a circle with a dish or something if you don't have circle templates. In the circle make the center and draw a few light ruled pencil lines to the center. Now do some brush strokes by laying the brush down just on the circles line and press down and stroke to the center while also lifting the brush a bit so you create a thick point that ends with a thin point. Do them long and short. Try this with a quill dip pen as well.
The reason for the watered down ink is to not waste ink as well as to not have a mess if you happen to smear the ink.
This will help developing the proper strokes for doing linework. The longer strokes will give you an idea of how long you can draw a line before the ink runs out. This way you can plan your strokes instead of winging it and having to match up strokes.
There isn't anything technically wrong with your inks it's just not mainstream comics inking.

VANDAL
08-06-2012, 10:54 PM
Justice gave you some good tips there. I am primarily a brush guy but I use quills for really long thick to thin lines (like her thighs in your work). A good sable brush will last you a VERY long time as long as you clean it religiously in warm (not hot) water. When using your sable brush try not to get the ink too close to the metal that holds the hairs together. I usually dip the ink about two thirds up. Here is an example of how I inked an Abreu piece.

http://fc08.deviantart.net/fs70/i/2011/299/b/b/inks_over_abreu_by_vandal1z-d4e0rht.jpg

Justice41
08-06-2012, 11:03 PM
If you used a brush to do the feathering on that Spidey pic you can press down a whole lot harder as you get to the spot blacks. Would add a whole new depth to the feathering as they are right now they are a bit thin

Adrianna
08-08-2012, 03:11 AM
I just wanted to say thank you for all the tips so far! :)

I will trying them this weekend :) :bounce:

Scribbly
08-09-2012, 04:22 AM
Is very good and cool that you had the entire piece finished.

It shows a lot of will and of course a lack of basic inking technique knowledge.
Don't be worry.
This you can learn easily and practice until it becomes part of your system.

There is a book on inking by Gary martin &Steve Rude that can help you on it.
And the book published by DC comics.
You can buy these online or find them in your library.

Before start inking is good to learn about the qualities and properties of the line.
Line has light, weight and its own density according to the distance.

Inking is all about the management of the line and its values.

When inking is convenient to work on separate steps.
1) Delineating forms.
2) Spotting blacks and shadows.
3) Adding crosshatching, patterns and textures.
4) Retouching.

When delineating forms you can work on separate steps as well
1) Working figures (you can subdivide it by areas, hair, face, hands, clothing.)
2) Working lineal objects and artifacts, with help of rulers and French curves.
3) Working organic elements (nature) by hand.

You already have the will and stamina.
With the help of some basic technique you will improve soon.



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