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The Predator
12-22-2009, 02:05 AM
Simple question.
What do you think?
What is the best way to earn some money in this business. is it to publish online or is it to publish through ka-blam and comicsmonkey or simply join the big companies?
I have noticed that the business has shrinked, it is much harder finding work today than it was ten years ago. At least here in Europe.
It is not a good sign.
Is it the same for you?
Cheers
the predator

Jason Arthur
12-22-2009, 03:09 AM
best way to LOSE money is to make comics.

:whistlin:

Hopefully someone will come along to prove me wrong.

-- J

Fred Duran
12-22-2009, 03:12 AM
Simple question. What is the best way to earn some money in this business.
simply join the big companies
I don't know too much about the business side of comics, but I do know enough to tell you pretty definitively that a) you'll be lucky to break even with self-publishing endeavors, let alone make any type of profit, and b) that it is FAR from simple to join the "big companies."

covenx
12-22-2009, 04:01 AM
Is there any field that it's easy to find work in today? There are ways to make money in comics, but if you are looking to make large amounts your best bet is in attempting to get your characters licensened.

galmando
12-22-2009, 07:03 AM
yeah, get them licensed would probably be the best way to get the big bucks.

but to do that, you gotta make some want to invest in you freshly created unknown character.

i always wonder things like 'if Kick-ass was thought of and independently published by someone else, would it have gotten a movie made?'

i dunno, suppose nowadays it's who you know.

maverick
12-22-2009, 10:36 AM
The best way to make money in comics is to be an artist. A talented one.

Artists can make money at cons, selling prints and doing sketches. They can be hired by publishers (large and small) to draw covers, or interiors.

And they get all the chicks.

Publishing is nothing. Anyone can do that. It's the sales you make after you publish something that counts.

maverick
12-22-2009, 10:40 AM
i always wonder things like 'if Kick-ass was thought of and independently published by someone else, would it have gotten a movie made?'

i dunno, suppose nowadays it's who you know.

I really doubt the movie studio came to Millar/Marvel and asked if they could make a movie out of their comic.

Millar almost certainly pushed for a movie, in fact he probably wrote the comic with that sole intention in mind. I mean, they started making the movie at what, issue 3??? Granted, it probably helped that Millar aleady had one movie under his belt, but shit like that doesn't happen unless the creator is pushing for it.

fbwash
12-22-2009, 02:13 PM
Is there any field that it's easy to find work in today? There are ways to make money in comics, but if you are looking to make large amounts your best bet is in attempting to get your characters licensened.


BINGO- Licensing is the magic word. Many people believe that comic books will somehow equate to "real money". A smart publisher/business person will be looking at the bigger picture. The much bigger picture is merchandising, film, animation, toys etc.
Mark Millar was able to get Kick-Ass made because he has a viable body of work behind him to substantiate the face time to a studio exec.
Having the book sales, John Romita Jr. also helped cement the deal.
My thought on Kick-Ass - "Will it go the way of Sin City or The Watchmen?" Both movies were phenomenal in my eyes.
yet the reality is that the merchandising for Sin City was a lot better than Watchmen.You barely hear anything about the toys for Watchmen that much- yet Sin City merchandise had about a year of strength after the film was released.

Two good films yet one was received a certain way by the masses than another. Kick-Ass the movie needs to be strong a film to warrant good merchandising appeal. One movie that did well was District 9- Unfortunately the merchandising machine was not there. Where were the action figures???

I would suggest to any creator out there trying to develop a comic book. be conscience of what you're looking to achieve...
And bear in mind that the bigger picture is what the big boys want to see.

peace

Frankie B

NaveenM
12-22-2009, 04:49 PM
I really doubt the movie studio came to Millar/Marvel and asked if they could make a movie out of their comic.

I think you'd be surprised. The impression I get is that very many creators (generally of the top tier) are approached by studios, or even by people working for big name stars, to option their comic.

It seems that at places like San Diego, there are reps of the studios just walking around, looking for "properties" to buy.

Wanted was optioned after the first issue came out. The main reason why the comic and the movie are so different is b/c the screenplay was being written even as the comic was being written, and it was happening independently.

maverick
12-22-2009, 05:37 PM
I think you'd be surprised. The impression I get is that very many creators (generally of the top tier) are approached by studios, or even by people working for big name stars, to option their comic.

It seems that at places like San Diego, there are reps of the studios just walking around, looking for "properties" to buy.

Wanted was optioned after the first issue came out. The main reason why the comic and the movie are so different is b/c the screenplay was being written even as the comic was being written, and it was happening independently.

Again, I doubt the studio came knocking on Millar/Top Cow's door after 1 issue. It's something Millar wanted from day one (no pun intended), otherwise he wouldn't have "cast" likenesses in the comic.

NaveenM
12-22-2009, 06:02 PM
Again, I doubt the studio came knocking on Millar/Top Cow's door after 1 issue. It's something Millar wanted from day one (no pun intended), otherwise he wouldn't have "cast" likenesses in the comic.

You were talking about Kick-Ass, not Wanted.

After Wanted made the loot that it did, I don't doubt the studios were asking Millar what else he had.

appomo
12-24-2009, 02:23 AM
whats about stuff published trough image. elefantman is now on issue 22 shouldnt such a comic make enough money to "life" from

dmh_3000
12-24-2009, 02:34 AM
whats about stuff published trough image. elefantman is now on issue 22 shouldnt such a comic make enough money to "life" from
Not necessarily. I think you have to sell something like 2500 copies before Image gives you any money. So if you only sell 3000 you'd only make a couple hundred dollars. And if you were paying the artists, you probably wouldn't be making anything.

The Predator
12-24-2009, 12:12 PM
Not necessarily. I think you have to sell something like 2500 copies before Image gives you any money. So if you only sell 3000 you'd only make a couple hundred dollars. And if you were paying the artists, you probably wouldn't be making anything.

So in a way this is nothing to aim for if you want to earn money on your art and comics, itīs just if you have it as a hobby. I heard that creators who had done pretty well at Image still didnīt earn any money so they rather publish their comics online.
Itīs a funny world.
The predator

NaveenM
12-24-2009, 01:29 PM
Here's an analysis by Todd Allen over at PW: http://www.publishersweekly.com/article/CA6617383.html

Clearly, you need to sell a lot of books to make money as a print publisher.

The other obvious (and overall much more lucrative) way is licensing. Marvel and DC don't make much off sales of Spiderman and X-Men comic sales. It's all the other merchandise.

It's not an easy road as an indie creator. Don't expect to get rich fast (or even break even).

harryd
12-24-2009, 02:38 PM
Here's an analysis by Todd Allen over at PW: http://www.publishersweekly.com/article/CA6617383.html

Clearly, you need to sell a lot of books to make money as a print publisher.

The other obvious (and overall much more lucrative) way is licensing. Marvel and DC don't make much off sales of Spiderman and X-Men comic sales. It's all the other merchandise.

It's not an easy road as an indie creator. Don't expect to get rich fast (or even break even).

Just cleaning up the last sentence:

"It's not an easy road as an indie creator. Don't expect to get rich (or even break even)."

4-9-studios
12-24-2009, 03:07 PM
I speak to a Very well known artist at Cons and Online(Currently working at Marvel) and he's told me if it weren't for all the licensing that the big companies do (Marvel, DC) they wouldn't be around anymore. Tons and Tons of money are being lost by them, and what keeps them going are Movies, Toys, etc. So if they're struggling, an indy artist is definitely not a money maker.

From what I've heard from many Comic Artist is they they make more money doing concept designs for Games, Movies, etc. and do Comic books as a side job.

The Predator
12-24-2009, 03:20 PM
Yes,
I had my thoughtīs about going that way as well, but is there any good sites where you can find work as a concept artist?
The Predator

dmh_3000
12-25-2009, 09:16 AM
Yes,
I had my thoughtīs about going that way as well, but is there any good sites where you can find work as a concept artist?
The Predator
Conceptart.org is a good place to go. Sometimes I just go there to check out the galleries and wish I could do stuff like that. With enough practice it'll eventually happen, but not today.

But back to the site, they have special forums for full time jobs, part time jobs, casual and freelance work or even non-paying. You can also go to a forum that says "I'm someone interested in working." Types of jobs seem to be for comics, game designs and film/TV concept art.

Allegory Comics
12-25-2009, 10:31 AM
In my experience, the best way to make the most money in comics is to shred your entire collection and sell it to a paper recycling company.

Hanzou
12-27-2009, 04:44 PM
There's lots of money to be made in all honesty. You just have to be willing to branch away from superhero stuff when necessary. Let's face it though, if you like drawing Batman and X-Men, you shouldn't have a problem drawing Star Wars or Conan.

I'm currently making money off of revenue and print sales from my web-comic, sales of prints at shows, commissions, and freelance work. I make a lot more money from prints, commissions, and freelance than comic books.

The profit margins from comics is razor thin, while the profit margin for 11x17 prints is huge. I can go to staples and get a print done for $1.50 and sell it for $10. Meanwhile, printing a comic costs just as much, but I'd be "overcharging" if I charge $3.50 for a single copy. :blink: Likewise with freelance, you can draw a half a page b/w image and make $50-150 a pop depending on who you work for.

If you can get some commissions going, its even sweeter. There's some guys who charge $50-100 a sketch, and they aren't even big-named creators. Guys like Adam Hughes and J Scott Campbell sell sketches for even more.

The old adage is true, you gotta LOVE sequential work to want to do it these days. Its literally a labor of love.

dmh_3000
12-27-2009, 09:44 PM
There's lots of money to be made in all honesty. You just have to be willing to branch away from superhero stuff when necessary. Let's face it though, if you like drawing Batman and X-Men, you shouldn't have a problem drawing Star Wars or Conan.

I'm currently making money off of revenue and print sales from my web-comic, sales of prints at shows, commissions, and freelance work. I make a lot more money from prints, commissions, and freelance than comic books.

The profit margins from comics is razor thin, while the profit margin for 11x17 prints is huge. I can go to staples and get a print done for $1.50 and sell it for $10. Meanwhile, printing a comic costs just as much, but I'd be "overcharging" if I charge $3.50 for a single copy. :blink: Likewise with freelance, you can draw a half a page b/w image and make $50-150 a pop depending on who you work for.

If you can get some commissions going, its even sweeter. There's some guys who charge $50-100 a sketch, and they aren't even big-named creators. Guys like Adam Hughes and J Scott Campbell sell sketches for even more.

The old adage is true, you gotta LOVE sequential work to want to do it these days. Its literally a labor of love.

And that's a problem for writers. Artists can make more money easily if they do stuff like this. We have to generally be the ones to pay for the art team, the printing, the distribution and the advertising. That's why I keep drawing, even though after a few years I'm still nowhere near ready.

Still, I've found being able to ink your artist's pencils can really help you along with your own drawing ability.

Christian Beranek
01-02-2010, 04:10 PM
I think you'd be surprised. The impression I get is that very many creators (generally of the top tier) are approached by studios, or even by people working for big name stars, to option their comic.

It seems that at places like San Diego, there are reps of the studios just walking around, looking for "properties" to buy.

Wanted was optioned after the first issue came out. The main reason why the comic and the movie are so different is b/c the screenplay was being written even as the comic was being written, and it was happening independently.

The suits do approach creators at cons and tons of comics are optioned -- but yes, you do have to push. You can't just hand your work over and magically expect a movie to get made. It takes tons and tons and tons of meetings, follow-ups, etc...

Mark Millar is a genius at marketing himself. He keeps interest on his work high, thus his stuff is always front and center when the Big Suit presses his/her finger on the greenlight button.

It's not a magical process, but the results can be magical.

Work work work.

NaveenM
01-02-2010, 09:28 PM
The suits do approach creators at cons and tons of comics are optioned -- but yes, you do have to push. You can't just hand your work over and magically expect a movie to get made. It takes tons and tons and tons of meetings, follow-ups, etc...

Mark Millar is a genius at marketing himself. He keeps interest on his work high, thus his stuff is always front and center when the Big Suit presses his/her finger on the greenlight button.

It's not a magical process, but the results can be magical.

Work work work.

Yeah, I totally agree. I didn't mean to give the impression that I was saying it just comes to you if you put your book out there.

What's the use of a product if no one knows about it? Marketing is king whether or not we like it.