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JamieRoberts
10-18-2008, 03:17 PM
I just caught Simple Minds' 'Don't You Forget About Me' on Vh1 while eating my dinner. Obviously, my thoughts turned to The Breakfast Club and in turn the John Hughes classics. Then it struck me.

Films like The Breakfast Club and Ferris Bueller's Day Off really struck a chord with a generation of filmgoers. I guess they were the ultimate in wish-fulfilment for teenagers, but on a more realistic level than other escapist classics like the Indiana Jones or Bond films. I can't think of many recent examples of entertainment that's resonated so much that they become synonymous with a time period or type of person.

But there have been films, TV shows, music (probably most prominently) and books that have achieved this. Are there any comics?

It's one thing for a comic to be well written, well drawn and well received, but even Watchmen doesn't have that status. It's just a bloody good book. I suppose it doesn't help that 90% of comics feature impossible situations and characters, playing to their strengths at least.

So has anybody read a comic that just felt like it (without trying to sound too trite) 'spoke to them' in any way? I honestly can't say I have. Never read Maus, so maybe I'm missing that one.

Newt
10-18-2008, 03:46 PM
I kinda think that if I were fifteen or twenty years older and actually had read the original run of Love and Rockets while it was being published it would have resonated a lot more with me. I enjoy the hell out of those comics, but they're deeply rooted in the 80's.

Buckyrig
10-18-2008, 03:51 PM
I never read the series at all, but I read an interview with Chuck Dixon where he was asked something to the effect, "what work are you most proud of," and he cited an issue of The 'Nam that he said people always tell him made them cry.

Mostly, I'm hoping someone has more info on it. :D

Wayne Drake
10-18-2008, 04:10 PM
I'm gonna go with Grant Morrison's Doom Patrol run.

KHudd
10-18-2008, 04:18 PM
I think Preacher, Y: the last Man and Ex Machina spoke to me in a way that superheroes arent the only good comics. I'm currently reading Maus and I'm enjoying.

MARS
10-18-2008, 04:30 PM
In my day (which is weird to say these days)--

I'd have to say Chris Claremont.

He made the X-men what they are today. The Days of Future Past storyline still imitated and often repeated today in comics.

M.

knockedoutpanzer
10-18-2008, 04:37 PM
Action and by association 2000AD . They were so different to the American Super-hero comics of the time. Action had one of the greatest lines I ever read, in a prose story in one of the annuals:- "his head exploded like an over-ripe melon smacked with a sledgehammer".

Buckyrig
10-18-2008, 04:39 PM
Films like The Breakfast Club and Ferris Bueller's Day Off really struck a chord with a generation of filmgoers. I guess they were the ultimate in wish-fulfilment for teenagers, but on a more realistic level than other escapist classics like the Indiana Jones or Bond films. I can't think of many recent examples of entertainment that's resonated so much that they become synonymous with a time period or type of person.

But there have been films, TV shows, music (probably most prominently) and books that have achieved this. Are there any comics?

So has anybody read a comic that just felt like it (without trying to sound too trite) 'spoke to them' in any way? I honestly can't say I have. Never read Maus, so maybe I'm missing that one.

Reading this again, it seems like there are two different questions. Addressing something closer to the first, the Giffen/DeMatteis Justice League worked for me on that level. Just really fun, goofy, superhero nonsense.

Buckyrig
10-18-2008, 04:40 PM
Action and by association 2000AD . They were so different to the American Super-hero comics of the time. Action had one of the greatest lines I ever read, in a prose story in one of the annuals:- "his head exploded like an over-ripe melon smacked with a sledgehammer".

Gallagher is a comic book character in the UK? :huh:

BKMDog
10-18-2008, 05:15 PM
So has anybody read a comic that just felt like it (without trying to sound too trite) 'spoke to them' in any way?

I think that may be a broad general statement that applies to the work Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, etc., did in the early 60's at Marvel. It's likely that a lot of readers thought the unconventional characterizations that Stan gave those characters may have "spoken" to them, just as you suggest, Quones. Given the tone of the times, national and world events, etc. I was a very small kid as I was reading some of the mid-period, and later Marvel comics from that period during their first runs, and they certainly at least struck a chord with me as being totally different from any similar DC or Charlton books I'd read before them.

NickGuy
10-18-2008, 05:25 PM
JRJrs 911 spider-man comic

http://images.comicbookresources.com/previews/asm36/wtc3.jpg

ronin7
10-18-2008, 05:56 PM
The first arc of Ultimate Spider-Man for me.

ponyrl
10-18-2008, 07:03 PM
Joe kubert's 'Fax from Sarjevo' (sp).

PIMPZILLA
10-18-2008, 07:46 PM
Batman: Year One.

Dc: The New Frontier

V For Vendetta

Kingdom Come

Preacher

Identity Crisis

Troy Wall
10-18-2008, 10:14 PM
Optic Nerve

Paul Sanderson
10-18-2008, 10:49 PM
I think the 70s Batman stuff by the likes of O'Neil, Adams, Englehart and Rogers captured something of the mood of the day. I think The Dark Knight Returns and Batman: Year One did as well.

NickGuy
10-18-2008, 10:51 PM
id like to add DK2....

Mr.Musgrave
10-18-2008, 11:41 PM
id like to add DK2....


That gawd-awful 9/11 issue AND DK2? Now I have to come all the way out of hiding to beat you to death with a fucking Buick. :yuk:


On topic: Starman and Sandman Mystery Theatre. Best characterization I've ever come across in comics.

NickGuy
10-18-2008, 11:50 PM
That gawd-awful 9/11 issue AND DK2? Now I have to come all the way out of hiding to beat you to death with a fucking Buick. :yuk:

.


aww cmon, DK2 is a perfect parody of the internet age, and...well...at the time of 9/11 i was a little emotional, ok?! :cry:

PIMPZILLA
10-19-2008, 01:03 AM
I'd like to add Planetary

and Stardust. It's not a comic but, the copy I have, it has paintings, is sold as a Graphic Novel.

Mr.Musgrave
10-19-2008, 03:06 AM
aww cmon, DK2 is a perfect parody of the internet age, and...well...at the time of 9/11 i was a little emotional, ok?! :cry:


No!

Paul Sanderson
10-19-2008, 06:08 AM
I think the Perez/Potter/Wein issues of Wonder Woman were pretty good too, as were the original Wolfman/Perez New Teen Titans issues of the early 80s. Those featured some fine characterisations.

knockedoutpanzer
10-19-2008, 07:25 AM
Gallagher is a comic book character in the UK? :huh:


Maybe he read the same thing I did. :rolleyes:

Ian Ascher
10-19-2008, 08:58 AM
Joe Kubert's Jew Gangster
Giffen and Demattis on Justice League run
Claremont's X-Men from the 80's
Wolfman & Perez on Teen Titans

JamieRoberts
10-19-2008, 10:27 AM
See, I don't get it. Maybe it's just me, but I can't see how superhero comics can really have that kind of impact. Sure, there are levels of relatability (is that a word?) but nobody here is a costumed hero/villain with powers. Well, I'm not anyway.

When I mentioned the Breakfast Club, I think I was trying to get the point across that many teenagers could almost put themselves in the characters' places and as a result, found it to be comforting, cathartic, inspirational or any number of things.

I'm not saying that I disagree with any choices mentioned so far, but can superhero comics do that? God, I think I'm asking about eighteen different questions here.

Okay. To boil it down to the one essential question I have been trying to get at: has a comic ever felt like it was written just for you? There! I think that's it.

Buckyrig
10-19-2008, 10:42 AM
See, I don't get it. Maybe it's just me, but I can't see how superhero comics can really have that kind of impact. Sure, there are levels of relatability (is that a word?) but nobody here is a costumed hero/villain with powers. Well, I'm not anyway.

See, this was brushed on in your original post, but doesn't come off as a major or central point.

When I mentioned the Breakfast Club, I think I was trying to get the point across that many teenagers could almost put themselves in the characters' places and as a result, found it to be comforting, cathartic, inspirational or any number of things.

Personally, I've always found the characters in Breakfast Club to be embarrassing stereotypes that the movie seems to feel it shows them not to be...but really only manages to make some superficial explanations as to why they are stereotypes. And really, I never noticed these types when I was growing up.

I'm not saying that I disagree with any choices mentioned so far, but can superhero comics do that? God, I think I'm asking about eighteen different questions here.

Probably not, but obviously there's a gap between what you're trying to say and what we're hearing. :laugh:

Okay. To boil it down to the one essential question I have been trying to get at: has a comic ever felt like it was written just for you? There! I think that's it.

Even in literature, this doesn't necessarily correlate, for me, with being something with which I identify personally.

That's the gist of what I'm getting now. That you read something and say to yourself, "wow, I know exactly what that's like." Yes? No?

Biofungus
10-19-2008, 10:50 AM
I guess it depends on your own personal perceptions. For instance, I'll say "Me3", but I don't know if anybody would really agree with me...


Then of course, there's "Brute Force" from Marvel :p

JamieRoberts
10-19-2008, 10:54 AM
See, this was brushed on in your original post, but doesn't come off as a major or central point.



Personally, I've always found the characters in Breakfast Club to be embarrassing stereotypes that the movie seems to feel it shows them not to be...but really only manages to make some superficial explanations as to why they are stereotypes. And really, I never noticed these types when I was growing up.



Probably not, but obviously there's a gap between what you're trying to say and what we're hearing. :laugh:



Even in literature, this doesn't necessarily correlate, for me, with being something with which I identify personally.

That's the gist of what I'm getting now. That you read something and say to yourself, "wow, I know exactly what that's like." Yes? No?
Yeah.

Buckyrig
10-19-2008, 11:05 AM
Yeah.

In that case, I'm gonna go with Boris the Bear

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/1/12/Boris_the_bear01.jpg/180px-Boris_the_bear01.jpg

:D

quantum1019
10-20-2008, 06:53 PM
Claremont/Byrne/Austin's X-Men

Phatman
10-20-2008, 08:09 PM
Claremont/Byrne/Austin's X-Men

Definitely.

Mark Bertolini
10-21-2008, 12:51 PM
Y: The Last Man. That final issue, where Ampersand dies? I'm not ashamed to say I shed a couple of tears. Damn monkey....

WSSmith
10-21-2008, 07:58 PM
Resonate: The boy who collected spiderman was always a favorite.

Along with about every issue of Alan Moore's Swamp Thing.
Neil Gaiman's run on Miracleman where he showed how you can build on a masterpiece and all his Sandman.

Dave Sim's Cerebus
Frank Miller's RONIN
Grant Morrison's Animal Man
All Star Squadron #1 (my favorite comic ever)
Matt Wagner's Sandman Mystery Theatre, but Grendel has always stuck with me as a masterpiece Hunter Rose v. Argent the final battle was perfect.
Paul Chadwick's CONCRETE and Mike Allred's MADMAN for same reason!
HULK: Future Imperfect
Hernandez's Love and Rockets

PIMPZILLA
10-23-2008, 02:35 AM
(Reformed list)


Kingdom Come

Preacher

Sandman

Marvels

Batman: Hush (When Tommy dies, before you know he's not really dead)

The Darkness( When he has to send Jenny away)

There are alot of other miscellaneous issues like The Killing Joke, Whatever Happened to The Man Of Tomorrow, etc.

Paul Sanderson
10-27-2008, 04:45 AM
See, I don't get it. Maybe it's just me, but I can't see how superhero comics can really have that kind of impact. Sure, there are levels of relatability (is that a word?) but nobody here is a costumed hero/villain with powers. Well, I'm not anyway.

When I mentioned the Breakfast Club, I think I was trying to get the point across that many teenagers could almost put themselves in the characters' places and as a result, found it to be comforting, cathartic, inspirational or any number of things.

I'm not saying that I disagree with any choices mentioned so far, but can superhero comics do that? God, I think I'm asking about eighteen different questions here.

Okay. To boil it down to the one essential question I have been trying to get at: has a comic ever felt like it was written just for you? There! I think that's it.

In my case, I think the Potter/Wein/Perez Wonder Woman issues, and the Wolfman/Perez New Teen Titans issues (the first few years or so I'm referring to, not the later issues) did touch on some real life stuff, hence they spoke to me (and many others). Those comics weren't just the usual, typical superhero fare. They were about much more than that.

The Spirit
10-27-2008, 03:36 PM
Will Eisner's post war Spirit run 45-48 specifically.

Dc: The New Frontier

Astro City

Maus

Jar of Fools

Madman: The Oddity Odessey

Escapo

Batman Superman Generations