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View Full Version : How to charge for storyboards? (help!)


Matango
07-07-2008, 05:22 PM
I just got a job offer and I don't know how to charge for storyboards.

Per scene, per picture? How much, profession and seasoned artist charge for storyboards?

I have no idea... HELP MEEEEE!

Calloway
07-07-2008, 05:38 PM
When in doubt figure it out.

How much would you work per hour for? How many panels can you get done in an hour? divide that number.

There is also industry standards you could google up.

MARS
07-07-2008, 05:42 PM
Per day.

Whatever your day rate is what i go by depending on the project and their budget.

M.

Matango
07-07-2008, 06:41 PM
When in doubt figure it out.

How much would you work per hour for? How many panels can you get done in an hour? divide that number.

There is also industry standards you could google up.


Thats what I'm looking for; industry standards. I don't want to screw up the category with low prices.

I'm still google-ing

Per day.

Whatever your day rate is what i go by depending on the project and their budget.

M.


Per day seens very accurate due to the kind of job I'm getting. But there is per day standard isn't?


Thank you guys

Hugh Vogt
07-07-2008, 07:11 PM
Hi there,

It depends on your venue: is this a gig for advertising? Film? Commercial? etc

Knowing this would help us work out a plan for you. Generally, a film gig will be a "per day" but usually a "per week" format. Industry standards go from $750-1000/week on the low end to upwards of $2,500. Your experience and a film's budget, especially, will dictate a figure.

Commercials for TV usually are a "per day" thing, and again usually depending on the budget, a 30-sec spot can generate $500-600 for a day's work. (Which is the longest it should take you anyway.) If your just starting out, you'll probably be offered a flat fee regardless of how long it takes you. If they ask for a "per frame" rate, you have a much greater price range to play with, with $15/frame (3" X 5") on the very low end to upwards of $30, 40, maybe up to 60/frame if your very good and very fast. Obviously larger frames will be more.

But like I said, all of this is determined by the type of client, your experience, and the budget involved.

--Hugh

Calloway
07-07-2008, 08:39 PM
I've been out of touch with the film industry for a few years but there is a rate sheet. The numbers are probably different now and I don't recall the exacts BUT there were levels based on the budgets of projects. Generally low budget and big budget studio films. There were also t.v. standards but those seemed to be a rarity given the nature of some television filming.

Hugh seems to have it closer to what I remember.


edit: found this and skimmed it. You may want to read it:

http://books.google.com/books?id=sH08eJxBzMMC&pg=PA245&lpg=PA245&dq=storyboarding+industry+pay+rate&source=web&ots=SPd2nTugJQ&sig=lF8wf7u2SwLkC3ioC1EHlBIhKWk&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=7&ct=result#PPA429,M1

D.J. Coffman
07-07-2008, 11:16 PM
Probably best to charge per frame

From theGraphic Artist Guild's pricing and ethics handbook:

http://djcoffman.com/storyboard-rates.gif

Hope that helps some of you guys.

Calloway
07-07-2008, 11:32 PM
That was the sheet!

Scribbly
07-08-2008, 05:59 AM
From the books to reality.
Per frame/panel.
$12 to $18 B/W with greytones.
$20 to $25 full color with pantones.

This also depends if it is for animation, advertisement or film.
And who is the client.

What I can see from DJ list, these are the prices that the "Companies" are charging, but not the artists.

Matango
07-08-2008, 08:51 AM
Thanks everybody.

The work is none of these metioned above. The storyboard is for hologram interaction presentations (something like you saw at Madona with Gorillaz) . Very slick stuff.

I have to manage the animation and host positioning like a live chromakey

I'll have a reunion with director, animators and the show's host. All have to be decide in one day at latest. It is an events company, so all have to be fast and precise.

The budget need a number without variation. I also don't wan't the employee bitching about the discarted frame ideas.

I'll go for daily charge. All if you gave here will help to fix a price.

Thanks again.

Digitalwebbing rox!

D.J. Coffman
07-08-2008, 10:51 AM
From the books to reality.
Per frame/panel.
$12 to $18 B/W with greytones.
$20 to $25 full color with pantones.

This also depends if it is for animation, advertisement or film.
And who is the client.

What I can see from DJ list, these are the prices that the "Companies" are charging, but not the artists.

Actually, that's from the Graphic Artist's Guild Guide to pricing and ethical guidelines. A lot of times "companies" want to pay you a lot less or say "We'll give you X amount for the whole project!" but it never equals your time or per frame rate. That's why the GAG has a handbook, if all members stick closely to the prices agreed upon inside, then it becomes industry standard.

Scribbly
07-08-2008, 11:56 AM
Actually, that's from the Graphic Artist's Guild Guide to pricing and ethical guidelines. A lot of times "companies" want to pay you a lot less or say "We'll give you X amount for the whole project!" but it never equals your time or per frame rate. That's why the GAG has a handbook, if all members stick closely to the prices agreed upon inside, then it becomes industry standard.

Yes DJ, is not that I don't agree with you, because I do. I know of the Guide.
But those are IDEAL prices.

People always need to start from something.
Better to start from low than nothing.

Calloway
07-08-2008, 12:35 PM
No those aren't just hi budget standards.

If it's a lo to no budget not known company, sure set the prices BUT if it's a production with a producer you stick to those guidelines.

D.J. Coffman
07-08-2008, 12:48 PM
Actually, and rather ironically, in the higher up echelons of things, if you under price yourself, they'll actually NOT use you, where they might think your work is sub-par or amateur prices based on your skill and experience level. I don't think it matters if you have a "name" -- I know plenty of "no-name" guys who make those prices and a bit more for pre production work. It's definitely all about your samples and portfolio, and your turn around time. Pricing yourself low can really bite you in the ass. BUT, like you said, if this is a low budget or no name ad firm, and you want to make a couple quick clams with them, do it up.

Oh, and just in my experience and speaking on behalf of a few other freelancers I know of and heard their tales, be careful with low pricing through "agencies" or ad firms, because they'll keep using you all right, and that's all they'll be doing is USING you for your low rate, while meanwhile behind the scenes they've been paid by the studios or producers at probably double what you're charging for storyboarding services, in some cases the ad firm i making the same as you on the pre-production work, and that's pretty unfair when they haven't lifted finger. Just be aware of that, and you're golden.

Scribbly
07-08-2008, 01:23 PM
The fact that this company is asking an inexperienced guy to do the job, having thousand of professionals who know how much to charge and how do the job, should give us a clue of how much they are willing to pay.
Go with the guide standars, with $400 per key frames and let me know what you got.

Talking about pricing yourself low, will draw anything for $2?
:p That's funny.

eve
07-08-2008, 03:22 PM
The fact that this company is asking an inexperienced guy to do the job, having thousand of professionals who know how much to charge and how do the job, should give us a clue of how much they are willing to pay. Go with the guide standars, with $400 per key frames and let me know what you got.

That's not true, just as artists can have trouble finding clients, clients don't always know where to find artists. And Matango mentions a meeting, finding someone who's local is even harder.
Since I've seen his work around, I'd dare say Matango's a good artist, he might be inexperienced in storyboarding, but not in drawing.

D.J. Coffman
07-08-2008, 08:22 PM
Talking about pricing yourself low, will draw anything for $2?
:p That's funny.

It's a niche market. ;) Think about it though, that's actually $24 an hour for 5 minute doodles. ;) I figure it's best to get paid for my warm up sketching.

Scribbly
07-08-2008, 10:31 PM
It's a niche market. ;) Think about it though, that's actually $24 an hour for 5 minute doodles. ;) I figure it's best to get paid for my warm up sketching.

I know...I was pulling your leg.
You are such a master DJ!