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albone
03-06-2008, 11:37 AM
For a long time, I seem to have this ability to kill my work when going from sketchy pencils to tight pencils/inks. I'm at a loss as to how to fix that, so I thought I would seek some advice here.

Some things I do know is that I do NOT have a steady hand. This shows in the tighter pencils that I have a wobbly arm. If it helps, I'm using a 2mm mechanical pencil.

I know my anatomy, perspective, etc aren't always accurate and that's cool if you mention it, but I'd really love to know how to fix killing my work in the tightening stages.

http://www.workshedstudio.com/images/hold/help/help/Liz-dreamer-SBS.jpg


http://www.workshedstudio.com/images/hold/help/help/Liz-dreamer-SBS2.jpg

http://www.workshedstudio.com/images/hold/help/help/Sabrina-cheerSBS.jpg

Thanks for all of your help!

Newt
03-06-2008, 12:20 PM
I have similar issues, and I haven't totally solved them, but maybe this will be helpful anyway:

1) Don't tighten up your pencils. Go straight from rough pencils to inks to preserve spontaneity.

2) Use shields or frisket, so you can make sweeping motions with your pen or brush and not have to worry about stopping at exactly the right point.

3) Work at a larger size until you're comfortable with inks, then slowly scale down.

Gav Heryng
03-06-2008, 12:57 PM
It seems a bit weird, but it's almost as though you're not following your own lines sometimes. At some points in the examples below you seem to be arbitrarily (sp?) changin details that look perfectly good the way they were in the pencils. Think about it; you stopped the pencil drawing because you were happy with it, right? So why change it in the inks where it's irreversible. Also, you seem to be inking in an unusually thick line for the size of the drawing.

In regards to the shakey hand, it's maybe worth addressing why it doesn't hinder your looser pencils. Probably because you're more relaxed and feel free to make mistakes. Try and apply this thinking to your inks if you can.

Even so, not everyone is destined to become an inker. I can't ink for toffee (although I am attempting to learn) and I think my pencils are tight enough and losse enough for an inker to put their stamp on.

Your pencils are good. Concentrate on being happy with them before you dive into inking.

Dis

albone
03-06-2008, 01:42 PM
Bugger.

Sorry for not mentioning this before, but there are no inks with this whatsoever. Just 2B lead that's darkened in photoshop. Sometimes I run it through Illustrator's Live Trace but that only fixes some problems and gives me entirely new ones.

I do see what you mean about not following my own lines, like in the last ones arm. Maybe I'm rushing, I'm not sure.

I think the thick line comes because of the wobbly hand. Say a leg or arm, I do this stutter or wobble and do a pass over. Sometimes I have to pass over the passover and get this crazy thick line. So maybe I should erase the wobble and try the line again?

I've tried drawing from the shoulder. Yeah, not really working. The best thing to work so far when it comes to a straigher line is to draw from bottom to top.

I like the relaxed idea, I think that with a slower pace may work. Or does that sound real dumb?

Justice41
03-07-2008, 01:37 PM
It seems a bit weird, but it's almost as though you're not following your own lines sometimes. At some points in the examples below you seem to be arbitrarily (sp?) changin details that look perfectly good the way they were in the pencils. Think about it; you stopped the pencil drawing because you were happy with it, right? So why change it in the inks where it's irreversible. Also, you seem to be inking in an unusually thick line for the size of the drawing.

In regards to the shakey hand, it's maybe worth addressing why it doesn't hinder your looser pencils. Probably because you're more relaxed and feel free to make mistakes. Try and apply this thinking to your inks if you can.

Even so, not everyone is destined to become an inker. I can't ink for toffee (although I am attempting to learn) and I think my pencils are tight enough and losse enough for an inker to put their stamp on.

Your pencils are good. Concentrate on being happy with them before you dive into inking.

Dis
Bingo!! I was about to say the same thing. Try using a brush to ink. Pens and markers don't have enough play, so you wind up with wobbly lines more often than if you used a brush. Plus with practice the rush can give a better feel to the art, more organic.

dave_hearn
03-07-2008, 02:49 PM
First off, I really love your initial pencils!

I think part of your problem is that you are losing all of your spontaneity in you tighter pencils. When you're tightening why do you sacrifice all of your sketchiness for the more blobby look? Take a look at the pants on the female wrestler. The lines create shape and form but the "tighter" pencils just create a shadowy mass (no insult meant, man).

Here's something to try. Stop using the 2mm mechanical pencil and go pick up a lead holder. You can find them at an office supply store in the section where they keep rulers and such. Then buy 2 differernt kinds of lead; 2H and HB (you can find this at an art store). 2H provides a light, sketchy line and HB is much darker, personally I use that instead of inking.

Also, are you drawing with your wrist or your elbow? You mentioned a shaky hand, this might mean that you should physically loosen up a bit and let your arm do most of the work.

Keep going, brother! The pencils look great!!

-Dave

albone
03-09-2008, 10:46 AM
Thanks for the help guys.

Dave....I think I mis-wrote before. I think I have a lead holder....its this heavy thing with a claw at the end.

And I'll try to loosen up a bit too. Another good idea mentioned was not to use so much pressure either.

dave_hearn
03-09-2008, 02:19 PM
Thanks for the help guys.

Dave....I think I mis-wrote before. I think I have a lead holder....its this heavy thing with a claw at the end.

And I'll try to loosen up a bit too. Another good idea mentioned was not to use so much pressure either.

Yeah, that's it! Definitely try different leads. You should be able to use the same amount of pressure and achieve different effects with different.

You've got talent, bro!

-Dave

artsnake
03-19-2008, 09:58 PM
Try a pen with a finner point on it. You are loosing detail and some flair with such a clunky pen or what ever you are using. Also a pen with a smaller starting size lets you build up the line in the shape of your liking.

Calloway
03-20-2008, 02:03 AM
Shakey hands? Try this. Put something under your wrist as you draw. One of those mouse pad wrist things may help. I don't have shakey hands but I have seen this work for people in caligraphy and what not. It's not your hands that are unsteady, it's your wrist.

Biofungus
03-20-2008, 03:00 AM
There's one thing to consider: some people are just born pencillers/sketchers. If you find you go back and forth over your lines sometimes when pencilling, chances are you're going to have trouble inking your work, because your instinct is to sketch, but inking requires a smoother, refined stroke.

Calloway
03-20-2008, 01:48 PM
Well much is to be said about discipline. It took a while but I got the hang of it. It's nothing more then tracing :P

The DarkMind
03-20-2008, 02:04 PM
It's not your hands that are unsteady, it's your wrist.

limp wristed? :confused:

Lord Fejj
03-23-2008, 03:53 PM
My inking is awful but I would say loose the 'micron' type pens (not that they aren't good pens and can get great results) and go back to the old crow quill and brush, which are flexable and will give your line some character. Vary your line weights (think of the direction of your lighting).

sevans
03-25-2008, 07:06 PM
Lord Fejj has a very important point, think about lighting more.
Thinner lines on the light side, thicker on the darker side etc.
Pick your light source and stick with it, this will help add a sense of weight, volume and realism to your linework.

albone
03-26-2008, 11:00 PM
Honestly, I think just taking an extra 20 minutes and not being in a rushed or rusher state of mind is what's helping out. I'll post some examples when I can.