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shushubag
01-24-2008, 08:49 AM
OK I know when you're drawing your pages you want the eye to move left to right, right? The movement doesn't have to be going in that general direction as long as it leads the readers eye from left to right, correct?

I'm doing a page and my brain is being fried on this. I know I'll look at it tomorrow and see what I did wrong, the thing is I don't want to wait till tomorrow. I want to do it now.

I know it'll be tomorrow by the time I get some answers to this thread but I figured if I took a break it would come to me....








....and there it is.


Thanks guys! :)

John Rauch
01-24-2008, 03:25 PM
You got it! The panels just need to read from left to right, top to bottom. That doesn't mean the contents of each panel have to work left to right.

josephrey
01-24-2008, 04:16 PM
yes.

don't rush it if it's not feeling right. i'm sure there are other things to work on, so take a break. sometimes you only need 5 minutes away, sometime more before "what's wrong" pops out.

also, try turning the board upside down. sometimes things are aren't proportioned correctly will jump out at you by doing that. or hold it up to a bright light and look thru backwards. your eye gets used to seeing it in a certain way, and compensates. if you change things up, you'll see more.

BKMDog
01-24-2008, 04:28 PM
You got it! The panels just need to read from left to right, top to bottom. That doesn't mean the contents of each panel have to work left to right.

Panel contents don't have to be left to right, but it sure helps. If you want to see how to compose a picture, you should check old films. Classic film directors like William Wyler and George Stevens in particular ( among others ), compose almost every shot for left to right movement. Freeze 'em in your DVD player and you can study 'em at your leisure.

also, try turning the board upside down. sometimes things are aren't proportioned correctly will jump out at you by doing that. or hold it up to a bright light and look thru backwards. your eye gets used to seeing it in a certain way, and compensates. if you change things up, you'll see more.

Yup. Or, look at it in a mirror. The beauty of working on light box is you just draw normally, and then flip it as suggested, as you go along, and nail the problems before you get too involved in final pencil work.

shushubag
01-26-2008, 07:11 PM
You got it! The panels just need to read from left to right, top to bottom. That doesn't mean the contents of each panel have to work left to right.

Panel contents don't have to be left to right, but it sure helps. If you want to see how to compose a picture, you should check old films. Classic film directors like William Wyler and George Stevens in particular ( among others ), compose almost every shot for left to right movement. Freeze 'em in your DVD player and you can study 'em at your leisure.

also, try turning the board upside down. sometimes things are aren't proportioned correctly will jump out at you by doing that. or hold it up to a bright light and look thru backwards. your eye gets used to seeing it in a certain way, and compensates. if you change things up, you'll see more.

Yup. Or, look at it in a mirror. The beauty of working on light box is you just draw normally, and then flip it as suggested, as you go along, and nail the problems before you get too involved in final pencil work.

Yeah I got it. Sometimes when you're too into the page you can't see what's obvious to someone else. But I took a breather and went back to it and did what I had to.

Oh and I got my lightbox so it's all good.

Premature Inker
02-05-2008, 02:21 PM
When doing comic pages you have to also consider where the dialogue is going to ba and sometimes the word balloons can be placed in a manner where they themselves will lead the eye to the next panel...True,action doesn't have to read left to right but sometimes secondary actions can lead the eye,for instance:A hero is leaping right to left in your panel at some thugs(how can I get the readers eye to flow on to the next panel?)well,we can put a thug blasting off his gun just missing the hero and the shot is pointing left to right...hence our eye (if composed correctly)will follow that shot over to the next panel where we have the hero standing over the thugs....What I want to make clear is that you HAVE TO CONSIDER EVERYTHING IN THAT PANEL AS A POTENTIAL STORY FLOW ELEMENT!!!...Dailogue,captions,motion,reaction,eye direction,hand direction,leg direction,..EVERYTHING!

It's not easy but if you just remember to tell the story simply,it will make a difference.

J-

Premature Inker
02-05-2008, 03:30 PM
I whipped this fast layout out for you to peruse..now there are many other elements that could go into this but,I wanted it to be simple and un-cluttered and easily readable.
I made account where I put the caption and balloons as to not cover up action and I also took into account placement of sfx and body placement and although we see the bodies in a few panels turned right to left..the other elelements draw our eye to the next panel.

J-









http://i25.tinypic.com/30adfcy.jpg

Calloway
02-07-2008, 07:49 AM
You need an eye flow..something that leads from one panel to the next making a smooth transaction...In film we call this an eyeline (where one cut leads to another)

Panel 4 on the above makes the readers eyes flow off the page as the direction of the superhero dictates when it should be aimed towards panel 5.

shushubag
02-08-2008, 01:06 AM
Yeah the diagonal flows right off the page. THere should be something there that moves the eye towards panel 5.

And in panel 3 you have the word balloon covering up his leg when there's room to the upper right of the panel that you could use.

Premature Inker
02-09-2008, 02:23 PM
you guys are right but,if you will notice(it is a rough)the gun is shot off to the left and leads the eye to panel 5..there are many variations to every panel and sometimes action doesn't need to lead to the next panel and captions and word baloons pick up the rest..it varies and thanks for the comments.


J-

JMan
02-13-2008, 12:59 AM
Love these threads - I'd like to add that there are some times when you 'want' to go from right to left in action, or in story flow, or within the panel itself in order to 'hold the action back', or 'create a pause', or 'recoil'.

Left to right is progress, rythm, moving forward.

right to left is regress(ion), a 'twang' in the story, unnatural, shocking.

Depends on the story element. If you want the reader to really pull back - if you want the reader to feel the unnatural jarring of that particular plot point -- if you want the reader to relate to the struggle of the protagonist - then a right to left panel or pagenation thrust may be in order. What it does, basically, is create a pause in the flow. It's part of sequential art language, and is a tool which can be used.

I'd say if you're going to use it, use it very rarely - as an extreme story enhancement to emphasise shock, awe, or acute realization.