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Vacant Building
01-16-2008, 12:04 PM
Does anybody have any drafting furniture advice? My back canít take consecutive days drawing in an ordinary drafting chair at a table.

I find myself drawing on a lightweight drawing board while sitting back in a recliner and then inking at a table. Even so, itís hard on me.

Any advice?

Newt
01-16-2008, 12:19 PM
Take a break now and again to stretch. If your table is inclinable, set the board at a more vertical angle.

Vacant Building
01-16-2008, 04:15 PM
Thanks, Newt

Iíve fiddled around with table incline and stuff, and maybe the perfect angle is out there, but I donít know if I got what it takes to find it. One bad day makes my back slip or something, and then it takes about three days standing and moving to feel right again.

Iíve always wondered about those funny chairs that keep you kneeling forward. I just donít want to want to buy one and throw it out a month later.

V. Building

carynord
01-16-2008, 04:29 PM
I used to get a horrible bad back from working. IT all went away as soon as I started working out. :cool:

Biofungus
01-16-2008, 10:35 PM
Lower the chair. You may have it too high up, making you lean farther over the table than necessary, and hurting your back.

Other than that, get a large clipboard, and take breaks from the table. Work in your lap a little, because it's hard to sit back in the chair when you're at a table drawing, but working on a clipboard, you can relax a bit more.

Calloway
01-17-2008, 02:11 AM
Stick a drawing board on the wall...

draw standing up...

Vacant Building
01-17-2008, 10:44 AM
Thanks for the advice, Gentlemen. Oddly, the only thing I havenít tried is the radical idea of fixing the board on the wall Ė or suchlike Ė and using it kinda like an easel. I reckon Iíd struggle a midge with tight, finished drawings, but for layouts and sketching, I think it would work.

Maybe a system where I switched between table, chair and wall would fix things.

I donít suppose anyone out there has used one of those chairs, the kind that you sort of kneel forward on

zerbehammond
01-17-2008, 11:20 AM
you probably won't want a kneeling chair after reading this:
http://forums.macrumors.com/archive/index.php/t-185255.html

Vacant Building
01-17-2008, 01:52 PM
Nice Link, Zerbehammond

Useful stuff. Iím still undecided, though. Maybe I - as some Macrumors message boarders suggested Ė should go to a showroom and sit in one of these unusual chairs for a few hours and see how it feels. If the chair shop has a dependable returns policy I might take it home and experiment for a few days.

Gav Heryng
01-17-2008, 02:25 PM
I've always thought the best kind of chair was a beanbag. I've been toying with the idea of getting a low coffee table to put my Mac on and siting on a beanbag. I don't spend enough time at my drawing table to know if it's comfortable or not, but my office chair kills me.

Dis

Vacant Building
01-17-2008, 04:52 PM
Your mention of beanbag chairs is interesting, and I find myself considering how I might incorporate one into a drawing set-up. I remember beanbag chairs for childhood, and they were comfy, but they always seemed to flatten-out after a while and then your butt would hit the floor at the chairís middle point.

Do they make durable beanbag chairs, and do you draw while sitting in one

Gav Heryng
01-17-2008, 05:06 PM
Hmm. That much I'm not sure of. It's possible that after time you might lose the stuffing or the stuffing becomes flat, but I'm pretty sure you can just buy more.

Beanbags come in all sorts of sizes and shapes, but I have no idea how you incorporate it into a drawing board. You might wish to use Bio's suggestion of a clipboard if you go the beanbag route.

Dis

carynord
01-17-2008, 07:41 PM
Thanks for the advice, Gentlemen. Oddly, the only thing I havenít tried is the radical idea of fixing the board on the wall Ė or suchlike Ė and using it kinda like an easel. I reckon Iíd struggle a midge with tight, finished drawings, but for layouts and sketching, I think it would work.

Maybe a system where I switched between table, chair and wall would fix things.

I donít suppose anyone out there has used one of those chairs, the kind that you sort of kneel forward on


I worked off of an upright easel for a few months and quite liked it. It didn't affect the quality of my work one bit. This sounds like a good way to go --it definitely encourages good posture.

raya
01-18-2008, 05:59 AM
Does anybody have any drafting furniture advice? My back can’t take consecutive days drawing in an ordinary drafting chair at a table.

I find myself drawing on a lightweight drawing board while sitting back in a recliner and then inking at a table. Even so, it’s hard on me.

Any advice?

I can't use a drawing board much because of my back. Your best bet is to either get a Wacom Cintiq, touch screen monitor (not as good as a Cintiq though), or if you don't like the computer get an easel. I got an easel and my back feels a lot better! Also, if you are using a mouse, unless it's an iMouse (for the iMac, they are better for your back for some reason), get the Wacom Bamboo if you can't afford the Cintiq.

www.wacom.com

raya
01-18-2008, 06:02 AM
Your mention of beanbag chairs is interesting, and I find myself considering how I might incorporate one into a drawing set-up. I remember beanbag chairs for childhood, and they were comfy, but they always seemed to flatten-out after a while and then your butt would hit the floor at the chair’s middle point.

Do they make durable beanbag chairs, and do you draw while sitting in one

I got a chair with a long back, I'll try to post a picture, it's hard to describe. But it's what I needed for my back. Don't believe any salespeople, they will almost always try to sell you the more expensive chair! A beanbag chair is very hard to get up from when you have a bad back, try it at a friend's house or store before you buy it.

Gav Heryng
01-18-2008, 09:09 AM
A beanbag chair is very hard to get up from when you have a bad back, try it at a friend's house or store before you buy it.

Good point!

Make sure you're spry!

Dis

Calloway
01-19-2008, 06:13 PM
Have the desk high enough to wear you can stand at it ...like archeticts do

josephrey
01-19-2008, 08:13 PM
I used to get a horrible bad back from working. IT all went away as soon as I started working out. :cool:



i was going to say the same thing. what kind of shape are you in? excess weight can add additional stress to the spine, and soft muscles can let bones go astray and move into places they shouldn't. like, onto nerves.

the easel is a great idea. you'll notice a bit of burn in the arms, but that will pass. i used to use a window for a light box, and that KILLED my arms.

also try to keep a good posture at all times. if the spine is aligned (as it should be) there will be less stress and pain. if it's bent over and kinked in half... well, don't do that.

:)

MARS
01-23-2008, 12:17 AM
Working out and stretching.

I go for runs and walks alot. I try to only stay at the table for maybe 2 hours max...before it was suggested to me to workout.

I get alot of pain and stress on my arms and wrists now. I'm thinking this is something most artists deal with.

There are some times ( longer hours and OT @ the table) That i will were a splint brace.

I also started wearing these "icy/Hot" patches on my wrist (not always-just when i feel alot of pressure) and sometimes back...these are godsends.

They really seem to help out.

M.

Lord Fejj
01-29-2008, 11:14 PM
Don't buy a cheap chair! A good chair costs several hundred dollars, but it's worth it. Always try out a chair in the store. Try putting your art on a drawing board and setting on your lap and against the edge of your drawing table, you can sit up a little straighter this way.

raya
02-01-2008, 07:01 PM
Don't buy a cheap chair! A good chair costs several hundred dollars, but it's worth it. Always try out a chair in the store. Try putting your art on a drawing board and setting on your lap and against the edge of your drawing table, you can sit up a little straighter this way.

Sorry, this is not true. Sales people will try to make you buy the more expensive ones, even if they don't support your back, they did that to me. My chair was on sale for $50, and is great! Don't believe any salespeople, believe your doctor, and ask him if you want a professional opinion. ;)

FYI, salespeople are trying to sell you something, so they can get commision. It is more likely they are thinking of how to pay their next bill, then how to save you money. I know it's depressing, but it's true.

Lord Fejj
02-04-2008, 02:28 AM
If you can get an inexpevsive chair that works for you that is awesome. I know people that sit on those horrible old wooden stools. My old company used to buy ergonomic chairs for people with back problems, who have to sit all day in them. They're expensive but if they help your back their worth it. I don't listen to the salesmen when I pick a chair, I sit in it, for a long time. I put it into all its positions. I've had chairs that make my back ache horribly, usually cheap ones, but not always. The chair I have now is awesome, I can sit in it all day, it was a couple hundred bucks. I actually found it at costco where they don't have salesmen.

I also think standing and working vertically on a wall or easel is a good idea.