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rml8607
01-05-2008, 03:30 PM
Ive heard a lot of people using different tools, but I want to know what is the best. There are so many brushes, pens, quills, and ink out there and i was wondering if anyone had opinions on what produces the best product. Also, what kind of paper is best?

Archermonkey
01-14-2008, 06:33 AM
I'm no expert, but following suit with what I've heard about a lot of professionals, I've taken to using Crow quills - though I wasn't able to find them here in Australia they were pretty cheap to order from England. Only a few dollars, and it took about a week for them to arrive. It takes a little bit of practice to get used to, but I've been satisfied with the results myself. For anything that should look organic (flesh, hair, fabric, etc) I use a brush. Not having the money to buy too much for inking (pencilling being my main focus) I've just taken to using the size 1 brush that I bought at a hobby store for miniature painting.

As for paper, you're going to want to use Bristol board.

jeffo46
01-14-2008, 07:48 AM
I get all of my inking supplies from Bill Cole,who is located in Massachusetts.He has been in the business a long time,first as a supplier of comic bags,and now,he has his own line of artists acessories such as pencils,inking supplies,etc.Plus he has the best bristol board available,which I think is a lot better than the Blue Line product.Check him out,you won't be dissapointed.

UniverseX259
01-14-2008, 12:11 PM
There's a ton of stuff you can get, but there are some more popular, or more commonly used products:

- Hunt 102 crowquill
- Windsor & Newton or Raphael #3 or #4 brush
- Higgins Black Magic ink
- Bristol board (Smooth or rough, depending on preference - Strathmore is good, and I've heard good things about Utrecht)
- Some form of white correction substance (I used this stuff called Pro-White, but there's probably other stuff to use)

There's really no limitations as to what you can use. I forgot who it was, but they said something along the lines of it being kosher to use anything that can make black and white on a page. Some products are just more archival and better for the art than others. Using Sharpies and plain white out to make black and white is simple, but it's not as sophisticated or as clean as using India ink.

On a side note, I'm interested in knowing what you guys use for corrections/making white. That Pro-White stuff is pretty good, but it's very tempermental and takes some time to mix up. I also have some white FW acrylic ink that I left the top off of to thicken up, and it sort of works, but it's pretty transparent. I'm wondering if there's something better I could use.

Adam Black
01-25-2008, 04:57 AM
On a side note, I'm interested in knowing what you guys use for corrections/making white.

I never could find anything worth a damn that didn't smell like ammonia, which gives me a migraine.

So now I use Photoshop. ;)

UniverseX259
01-25-2008, 01:19 PM
I never could find anything worth a damn that didn't smell like ammonia, which gives me a migraine.

So now I use Photoshop. ;)

Hah hah, oh well.

mattchee
01-25-2008, 01:35 PM
I use Rapidograph technical pens a lot. I'm trying to get into using a brush, though, cause i tend to "mock" the brush effect with the pens, so i figure... why not just use a brush?

I like the higgins black magic too.

I have a white correction paint but i forget the name. Doesnt smell bad. I also use PS.

I hate elipse and circle templates and french curves and flexicurve use with a passion. They usally lead me to makeing things look worse than better.... if theres something i just cant freeball-- i use PS and the pen tool. There... i said it. Wont be such a big deal if i switch to digital all together, though!

Eonprez
02-09-2008, 12:55 AM
For great quality comic art paper, check out www.eonprod.com

-Brett