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shushubag
07-13-2007, 08:37 PM
I've been working on my lay-outs and have been having trouble when doing pages with alot of panels. I have this one page I'm trying to cram in 10 panels which is a high count for me because I like to give a broad scope of what's going on.

I know there are people out there that do more panels per page. My question for you guys is how do you guys do it?

Do you lay-out and then blow up the image?

Or do you go straight onto the artboard?

I tried going straight onto the artboard but as of yet I'm not confident doing it that way.

Gav Heryng
07-13-2007, 10:12 PM
I personally do my layouts on A4 printer paper, that way they're a bit closer to print size and I know roughly how big / small things need to be. There are some sadistic writers out there who'll put loads of panels on a page. I find any more than six or seven a pain to deal with. Some good reference for insane panel counts is Manga books. If a script is asking for ten panels on one page then you need to break each panel down and ask yourself; What is the least I can draw in this panel whilst still communicating what's in the script? For example, if one of your many panels says "A look of terror spread across his face", you could probably get away with just showing the character's eye - wide with terror. In some cases you may be able to combine or eliminate some panels to better assist the flow of the story. Discuss this with the writer and see if you can come to a compromise.

Hope this helps.

Dis

Premature Inker
07-14-2007, 03:13 PM
As i have stated many times on different posts..Our goal as storytellers is to tell the story...10 panels per page is overkill and you will also find you are confined to drawing very small...your page will suffer for these reasons....I think drawing for comics with 5-7 panels is confined already but,until they go back to 13 by 18 paper...it will be.As far as layout?...nobody can tell you how to do your layouts...again tell the story but foolow a few rules of thumb.
1.keep the panels interesting.
2.adjust the angles to make the story flow.
3.always set up the art so we read it left to right and onto the next page.
4.fancy compostions and flashy art are not what makes comics great...the story story being told properly does~!!!!5.
5.don't adhere to the flavor of the week style...most of those guys can't get a book out on time and therefore become one hit wonders..ie j scott campbell..joe maduriera..etc etc etc because there stuff is too time consuming and they worry more about how someone's ass looks than on the story!!!.
6.have fun and don't be too critical..it takes time and effort.be positive and you'll get it.


J

j giar
07-14-2007, 06:15 PM
There is no right or wrong when it comes to the number of panels...whatever it takes to tell the story....I work from thumbs blown up to 11x17 and put them on the lite box along with the board....

dano
07-14-2007, 08:16 PM
10 panels! is it dialogue?

Scribbly
07-14-2007, 11:14 PM
You can do lay-out and then blow up the image.
Or work from thumbs blown up to 11x17 and put them on the lite box along with the board.
All depends of your mood, needs, and proximity with a copy machine.
But in either situation don't forget to leave a 25% of the panel, top, middle or sides as areas for lettering.
And before start drawing, better is to lay and distribute the panels templates and lettering space for each page.

compton
07-15-2007, 10:26 PM
you may also consider transition pannels as well.
you can draw a larger pannel (one back ground) and then move the action through it using deviding lines.

shushubag
07-15-2007, 10:29 PM
dismas- I know what you mean. I can cram in the face and tight shots and get em really tight in there. On this page there's one of those tight shots the other nine are pretty much a nightmare.


Premature Inker- I know what you're saying but I don't want to make the writer compromise his script for my style. I want to see if there is any way for me to expand my view and try for a higher panel count.


j giar- Me too.

dano- Nope it's an action sequence.

Scribbly- OK I'll pass that message onto the letterer.

OK I guess I'm on my own for this one. I just wanted to know if there's anyone who does high panel count pages. I took a look at some comics and there are some with high panel counts in them so there has to be people out there who are totally comfortable doing them. If so what is there process?

Premature Inker
07-16-2007, 05:52 AM
Ok that is understandable...And i do agree with alot of what these other gents are saying.I usually work from a "marvel method" approach which gives me full freedom to lay the story out how i see fit..I can't think of a better way for me!!!It has a discipline to it that's for sure because i am responsible for all of the content and cannot blame anything on the writer and tell the editor "well it was his script!!"the up side?..I can speed up or slow down the pace as i choose.Good Luck and we want to see the pages once your done..and if you need help..don't be afraid to ask me.

J.

jakebilbao
07-16-2007, 12:13 PM
I tried going straight onto the artboard but as of yet I'm not confident doing it that way.
you know, a good way to overcome the fear of a blank page is to get the most expensive paper you have and draw scribbles on it, to your heatr's content. try every scribble you could imagine. circles are a good way to go. after realizing that you can have a lot of fun with an expensive paper, your confidence level when given a new blank page to do will go up. try it, you'll love it. :)

shushubag
07-16-2007, 11:56 PM
you know, a good way to overcome the fear of a blank page is to get the most expensive paper you have and draw scribbles on it, to your heatr's content. try every scribble you could imagine. circles are a good way to go. after realizing that you can have a lot of fun with an expensive paper, your confidence level when given a new blank page to do will go up. try it, you'll love it. :)

You know what I'm gonna try that. That sounds like good advice. I just find that as a whole page, it just looks and feels tighter lay-out wise when I work small then blow up to full size. BUt I like that suggestion.

JMan
07-17-2007, 01:49 AM
This is a great learning experience and it won't be the last time a writer hands you a script with more panels on it than you're comfortable with.

Keep in mind pace and tempo. With 10 panels, some are bound to be small, and small panels indicate quick action - I sometimes think of it as music notes when I do layouts to help with my sense of timing. Big wide panel = long steady note. Small narrow panel = sharp quick note.

Luckily for you, it's an action scene, so it will lend itself to smaller (quicker) panels. Think about the pace, the tempo, the rhythm of the action. Let your 'impact' panel(s) punch up a bit, and your 'quick strikes' in 'quick panels'.

A page that sounds like, 'da-da-da-BOOM' is 3 'quick' panels and one long loud one.

this make sense?

shushubag
07-18-2007, 04:18 AM
This is a great learning experience and it won't be the last time a writer hands you a script with more panels on it than you're comfortable with.

Keep in mind pace and tempo. With 10 panels, some are bound to be small, and small panels indicate quick action - I sometimes think of it as music notes when I do layouts to help with my sense of timing. Big wide panel = long steady note. Small narrow panel = sharp quick note.

Luckily for you, it's an action scene, so it will lend itself to smaller (quicker) panels. Think about the pace, the tempo, the rhythm of the action. Let your 'impact' panel(s) punch up a bit, and your 'quick strikes' in 'quick panels'.

A page that sounds like, 'da-da-da-BOOM' is 3 'quick' panels and one long loud one.

this make sense?

Yeah it really does. I've been playing music in a band for awhile now and all the musical terminology really resonates well into drawing comics. Both are forms of art. But things like rhythm, tempo, timing, and pacing are great for the story telling aspect. But there's also other stuff like when to be subtle, or over the top, or being too much or not enough also go great in music and comics.

compton
07-22-2007, 04:25 PM
I just think of it in terms of a movie the longer the cut would be in the movie the larger the panel should be.

Random Chance
07-22-2007, 05:16 PM
for really crazy aomut of frames per page that work insainly well when it comes to pace you can't beat violent cases. larger event frames mixed with close ups to point to the action is really your best bet for clear story telling. but just look at this 15 frame page. the action is broken down into small clear movements that point to a singel subject or action. it works it plays with time and your interaction with the story as a reader. if a writter wrights 10 complex frames with mutiple people and actions then it's bad story telling.

http://ljplus.ru/img3/q/_/q_w_z/Violent_Cases_p44.jpg