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secret-identity
06-07-2007, 02:08 PM
I'm a penciler. I've been drawing for over 10-11 years and when I draw I don't draw/shade in shadows on my living figures. Some contrast, but not complete darks because when I look at people, most of the time there is no black dark shadow spots; just different tones of color. So I figure, I leave it up to the colorists to put the lights and darks in.
Is this a mistake? My close friend tells me I should draw in shadows but I dont think it's necessary for a penciler to take it upon himself if a colorist can take care of that. There's no problem with doing it, but I want to know - is it something standard in the comic world? please send me in the right direction, or suggested direction.
Thoughts or comments

xombey
06-07-2007, 06:24 PM
that's one approach and it's a logical one. but do you never draw art meant to be seen in b/w?

Biofungus
06-07-2007, 07:15 PM
it's a logical approach, as Xombey stated, but impractical for comics. You have to spot blacks (well, either you or the inker, but if you're making the inker do it, he/she'd damnwell be getting paid as much as you are, because they're doing at least the same amount of work).

hannu
06-07-2007, 07:20 PM
You should occasionally spot blacks/use heavy shadows, because it can create a very dramatic effect. Learn to do it, donīt leave it entirely to the colorist. I find it pencillers job to define light sources and such, but thatīs just me.

dano
06-07-2007, 09:01 PM
It completely depends on the type of book you're doing and who's on your team. If you have a very painterly colorist you can draw it like a coloring book and let them go nuts.

However,
Don't find yourself in a position where you choose not to shadow because it's difficult and you don't want to bother learning it.
The greatest disservice you can do to yourself is to take short cuts to cover a deficiency.

secret-identity
06-08-2007, 12:01 AM
xombey: Thanks. When i draw.. though alot of my work doesnt get colored, I draw them and envisioned them of how they would looked colored.. is that bad?

Biofungus: Thanks, and yes, I see what your saying, and I agree. I think as a penciler, work should be done to a point where it's easiest for the inker

hannu: Thanks, the dramatic-ism is a good point. I've always noticed, but rarely do I pay attention to how darks and shadows can make art more dramatic. I immediately think about Jim Lee's versions of Batman and how much darks and shadows he uses on him. I am learning to do it. If it's not neccesary, it's always good to learn something new.

dano: Thanks, I dont work with a solid team yet, but my one particular friend who writes with me sometimes says that he likes art with shadowing and thinks its the best way for me to make a breakthrough in the comic world, and someone else's advice is usually to help someone.
I'm usually doing city scapes and rooftop fights where bright colorful art would go perfectly, but I will try to approach shadowing more. Sounds like the best way to go.

compton
06-11-2007, 07:18 AM
shadows should be used for tone and to show emotion. look a your favorite movies and how they use shadows . same could be said here

dano
06-11-2007, 10:24 AM
It depends. With the coloring techniques these days shadows in the drawing and inking stage aren't as much of a requirement.