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ArtisticBlasts
12-26-2006, 02:21 PM
Hello,

Some people stated that some (or maybe all) of my artworks kind of stiff / rigid in their poses. Feel free to check my gallery and see for yourself, for your own opinion about them. For some time, I tried to "break" it off. In the following "really rough sketch" pic, I tried to make an unstiff pose. Please let me know what you think. I really need any help I can get to break the "stiff" down :huh:

By the way, done in Windows Xp's Paint, and a mouse. Thanks for looking,

http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c317/artisticblasts/scraps/reallyroughsketch1.jpg

Twyla
12-26-2006, 06:01 PM
Most everything I've ever studied on the subject falls back to the line of action; basically, a simple line which defines the event being portrayed. Static events have relatively straight lines, while intense events (such as fight scenes) have lines which curve almost 180-degrees.

With the doodle you posted here, he's supposed to be running at a pretty good clip, but his line of action is practically a straight line from his head to his foot on the ground. If he was bent more at the waist, and his left arm thrust forward, his line of action would better suit his running.

ArtisticBlasts
12-27-2006, 07:50 AM
Most everything I've ever studied on the subject falls back to the line of action; basically, a simple line which defines the event being portrayed. Static events have relatively straight lines, while intense events (such as fight scenes) have lines which curve almost 180-degrees.

With the doodle you posted here, he's supposed to be running at a pretty good clip, but his line of action is practically a straight line from his head to his foot on the ground. If he was bent more at the waist, and his left arm thrust forward, his line of action would better suit his running. Will this do?

http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c317/artisticblasts/scraps/fojinmotions.jpg

BKMDog
12-27-2006, 10:10 AM
Twyla's comments on the line of action are correct. For my money though, on your more finished, second posted drawing / sketch, all you've really done is added more detail, you haven't made the drawing have more action or be less stiff.

Several things that may help:

- Get to a life drawing class, especially one that focuses on gesture drawing. The whole idea of gesture drawing is to focus on a quick sketch to capture the action of the pose ( yes, figures standing still, still have action and "thrust" to them ). Gesture drawing doesn't focus on the details of anatomy or so much on proportion - there's none of this: "OOoooo, lookit how you've captured the cuts of the pecs!" or: "Wow! Nice definition on the rector femoris muscle on that leg there!" Yes, that stuff is important, but anatomy is superfluous unless you catch the action and gesture FIRST. The best figure drawing artists - comics or otherwise - understand and practice this. I'd rather see a figure drawn with a free action and grace, than one that's stiff and dead, but has perfect anatomy. Detail almost always kills the action of a figure, so you can imagine the grasp of that principle that artists have who have life-like, action-filled figures, when things are fully inked and colored---imagine what the gestures or roughed-in drawings must have looked like? - how much powerful action and gesture they must have had, even as a sketch or a rough, for it to be maintained in the finish.

Two great comics artists that can really move a figure: Paul Smith and Alan Davis. Both these guys draw figures in comics that, as still shots, are frozen in time, yet they are so smooth and supple and capture the action so beautifully. Another couple of artists to study?: Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez and John Buscema leap to mind.

- Learn some things about basic body movements / mechanics. Left arm goes forward, right leg goes forward, for example. For me, getting that idea solidly in my head was one of the biggest strides forward in improving figure drawing and getting more action / reducing stiffness. Another one: The hip line and shoulder line generally oppose one another. If the shoulders are twisting and tilting forward and to the right, the hips are twisting and tilting back and to the left. The obvious reason is so that the body distributes it's weight and stays balanced. One other thing: When I began to think of the tissue between the masses of the body ( torso, hips, head, etc, and the line that's usually used to show them when constructing a mannequin in figure drawing ), as a supple "spring", instead of a solid "wire" or line, you have no idea how much that simple idea helped me improve.

Also, get interested in drawing people doing commonplace things and catching the suppleness of simple, everyday motions. Take your sketchbook and head off to the mall. That's the best place to see everyday people, different body types, etc. - and you won't have more than a few seconds to draw each one as they move on. That's the whole idea: short, sweet, quick - to loosen the hand and develop the eye so you can see the action in the most simple actions. Complex poses out of you your head will be far easier, once you're accustomed to doing 'em from life.

Studying figure drawing's a lifetime undertaking. It's far too intricate to discuss in a single message board post / thread. Nevertheless, I hope this helps.

dano
12-27-2006, 04:01 PM
^ what they said.


Also, don't learn to draw comics from looking at comics. You end up with horribly stiff and generic poses.
Learn to draw and then apply that knowledge to comics. Then your art will look fresh!

someone flying? Look at circus acrobats or high divers or parachute jumpers. Even underwater swimmers.
Someone running? Any track and field pictures. Olympics. etc. The one leg back one knee up pose should never ever be used again because it is soooo overused. No one runs like that. No one jumps like that.

RAMolinelli
12-27-2006, 04:06 PM
Agreed with what he said

Calloway
12-27-2006, 05:11 PM
Of course, drawing stiff never hurt travis Charest, but then you'd have to work on your technical skills to compensate. :laugh:

shushubag
12-31-2006, 02:17 AM
Of course, drawing stiff never hurt travis Charest, but then you'd have to work on your technical skills to compensate. :laugh:

That is so true but he can pull it off. What he lacks in movement he more than makes up in everything else. The guy is amazing.

Stiffness- You gotta really know your body and movement to get this ironed out. I took a peek at your portfolio and saw what was intended when you say stiffness. You gotta shed that comic book skin. In comics they have all these tweaked out almost unhuman poses. Like BMK mentioned you really gotta know how the body moves. Anatomy, physics, weight distribution, ballance, and action-reaction. All that stuff has to come into mind. It's more expanding the mind and training it to think another way. It's not the simple hey this looks cool mentality. It's not just a certain technique. You really have to get into another state of mind.

Practice- Just try stick figures first. Stick figures in everyday motions (again taking my cue from BKM) is a good excercise. Anatomy, learn the real anatomy- not from comics. Just the basics like when the arm is bent the bicep is bigger than the tricep but is smaller when the arm is straight. Bone structure is good to, but you can get away with starting with stick figures and layering on the muscle.

I used to train for fighting- boxing, grappling, MMA and all this stuff really helped put my mind into how the human body moves and reacts. Sometimes you gotta put the pencil down for this stuff just to get your mind going.

shushubag
12-31-2006, 02:24 AM
Oh and one more thing- take advantage of this site. Use the reference links and tutorial links, even the artist links. It's really great that alot of the things you'll need to reference are already here. It's great to know that someone before you has been at your stage in their artistic journey and left a trail for you to learn and follow.