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shushubag
11-14-2006, 04:43 AM
Ok I have a dilema.

I can't conquer the artboard! I mean I don't know what it is. I can't seem to get it. I think I'm affraid of it. Well not afraid of it, just afraid wasting it. These damn things cost me a bunch of money. And living overseas it's also a hassel to have them shipped.

Anyhoo- that's not really the problem.

I just can't get it the way I want it.

I tried to do a bunch of different ways to get it down but I can't seem to decide on which theory works best for me.

I tried laying out straight onto the board and tightening up the pencils there and didn't like the way that looked most times but there were a few times when it worked out great.

I tried to draw each panel on a seperate piece of paper then breaking up the artboard into different panels and then transfering using the lightbox and still don't like the way it comes out.

I haven't tried to lay-out on typing paper then blowing that up yet. Is that way a much better way to do it?

Does anyone have any thoughts on the situation? I'm all ears at this point.

BTW I think this section of the DW is great and have learned A LOT from the feedback from the people here.

BKMDog
11-14-2006, 06:23 AM
I haven't tried to lay-out on typing paper then blowing that up yet. Is that way a much better way to do it?

Yes. It's the way as far as I'm concerned. The are many benefits of doing it this way, some of the best ones I was taught and have found, are that it's ( A ) less intimidating than a whole, big, full-size page can be and ( B ) it allows you to get a more immediate overview of the whole design of the page, by virtue of the fact that it's smaller ( sort of like putting a bigger image on the far side of the room and standing back and looking at it ). And ( C ) it forces you to simplify things because of the small size and you're less likely to get absorbed in noodling the details, overworking and so on.

And just working with a dull pencil helps avoid that too. And do try and avoid that - doing wildly detailed thumbnails or layouts as finished art. So many people waste way too much time doing it, especially when they're in the beginning stage of the job.

A thumbnail / sketch / layout is just a prepatory stage for heading toward the finished page. In that light, and based on your post, you may be a little too focused that way as well, so try to think in those terms: You're preparing the work and do only as much work as is needed to go on to the next stage. Hope this helps.

shushubag
11-15-2006, 02:49 AM
OK I somehow knew it would come to that.

Hey can someone tell me how (or if it's possible) to blow an image up from 8 x 11 to 11 x 17 without using photoshop? Is that possible and if so can you walk me thru it?

Thanks BKM ;)

JLillustrator
11-21-2006, 10:35 PM
I get the cheap photocopy paper in 11x17 dimensions. I draw the heck out of everything there, working out issues like perspective, placement of negative and positive spaces, and leaving enough open area for the lettering. If a page isn't working for me, I chuck it and use another one. A pack of 250 pages costs about $5.00 on the mainland, probably no more than $10 in HI. That way, you don't feel like you are wasting expensive paper when a drawing goes bad and gets out of hand from ya'.

Once you are happy with the layout and such, tape the thin paper under the good board and , using a lightbox, redraw the image on the good paper, making the final corrections there.

Once you do the basic layout on the good paper, remove the old sketch from underneath and go to work on the board by putting in all the detail in pencils or add it when you ink it.

You end up making very good use of your expensive art board and your waste is very much reduced. Otherwise, just get used to seeing your inked artwork on pages that aren't perfect. As long as only the inked image prints clearly, then it doesn't matter if the page has smudges of pencil or if not all of the pencil art is able to be erased completely off of the art board.

Plus, I've used the back of used art boards with crappy drawings on them and have come up with some good drawings. Doubles the usage of your good artboard! This might not be the best solution if you sell your original artwork, though. Don't want to give away 2 drawings for the price of one!

Biofungus
11-21-2006, 10:41 PM
Borden and Riley (my paper of choice) makes 12x18 sketch vellum (my favorite type of paper), in 250 sheet blocks, for around 20-30 dollars (depending upon where you get it). It's 96lbs stock, and the price comes out to as little as 8 cents a sheet.

wisper
11-22-2006, 10:27 AM
Borden and Riley (my paper of choice) makes 12x18 sketch vellum (my favorite type of paper), in 250 sheet blocks, for around 20-30 dollars (depending upon where you get it). It's 96lbs stock, and the price comes out to as little as 8 cents a sheet.


Borden and Riley Denril Vellum drafting film..5 minuets trace..useing spiderman comic book.
http://img296.imageshack.us/img296/7638/spidermanveliumtrace001ny4.th.jpg (http://img296.imageshack.us/my.php?image=spidermanveliumtrace001ny4.jpg)

Biofungus
11-22-2006, 03:28 PM
I'm not talking about the Denril vellum. That stuff is expensive. I'm talking the sketch vellum. It's got a very nice light tooth, it's tough as heck, and great to work with. You can't beat it for the price.

shushubag
11-24-2006, 05:17 AM
I haven't tried to lay-out on typing paper then blowing that up yet. Is that way a much better way to do it?

Yes. It's the way as far as I'm concerned. The are many benefits of doing it this way, some of the best ones I was taught and have found, are that it's ( A ) less intimidating than a whole, big, full-size page can be and ( B ) it allows you to get a more immediate overview of the whole design of the page, by virtue of the fact that it's smaller ( sort of like putting a bigger image on the far side of the room and standing back and looking at it ). And ( C ) it forces you to simplify things because of the small size and you're less likely to get absorbed in noodling the details, overworking and so on.

And just working with a dull pencil helps avoid that too. And do try and avoid that - doing wildly detailed thumbnails or layouts as finished art. So many people waste way too much time doing it, especially when they're in the beginning stage of the job.

A thumbnail / sketch / layout is just a prepatory stage for heading toward the finished page. In that light, and based on your post, you may be a little too focused that way as well, so try to think in those terms: You're preparing the work and do only as much work as is needed to go on to the next stage. Hope this helps.

OK I tried it that way and I absolutely love the results. Now I can see how pros can do 2 or 3 pages a day. It just takes the pressure off staring at that blank artboard and thinking "I better not fuck this up!" Now there's a frame to work with and then perfect. Thanks BKM.

Oh and speaking of using bristol instead of the regular artboards check this thread out http://www.digitalwebbing.com/forums/showthread.php?t=101758

I recently did a drawing on bristol and inked it after and it was awesome. It really took the ink well. The regular blueline pro boards bleed all over the damn place. I can work with it but it's the last time I buy 500 sheets of blueline pro boards. It really is a nightmare tryng to build up your arsenal when you live out in the middle of nowhere. Shipping is really slow and most times I have to really track the shit out of things to get them here and half the time they never get here.