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shushubag
10-28-2006, 06:36 AM
I just saw the youtube thing with Rob Liefeld and saw that he did his lay-outs on a 8 x 11 paper (well actually an 11 x 15 folded in half) then blew it up.

Does anyone else do that also? If so what do you use to blow it up?

Biofungus
10-28-2006, 07:53 AM
11x17 folded. Most people use a copy machine (since the page is half size, you can easily copy it at 200% to get the actual size).

Occassionally, some people will use a projector if it's a somewhat non-standard size.

MadCow Menu
10-28-2006, 03:05 PM
The way I do my layouts is that I take a regular sheet of copy paper, put a comic on it and trace around it for the border. Everyone has they're own ways but I find this best because when you do your layouts that size, it's the size the page will be printed at when you print the comic. You can see what would get lost and spot blacks better when it's that size. Then I take that layout at comic size, scan it in the computer and blow it up to 11X17. Then I print it out on 2 sheets of paper, tape them together and throw my bristol on top of that on the lightbox. I trace it out--still kinda loose and do all the finishes right on the page.
There is a lot that can be lost when you are redrawing the page several times. My way it's only drawn twice if that.

shushubag
10-28-2006, 04:39 PM
Awesome guys! Thanks for answering so quick. Ken you are the man! Thanks for taking the time and putting up the reference links, it truly does save alot of time researching if the links are here instead of trying to find it on-line. I really suck at researching and finding good-links.

I have a mustek scanner and it doesn't print out anything on it what do I need to blow it up and print out an 11 x 17 paper?

Do I need a copy machine?

BKMDog
10-28-2006, 04:48 PM
You can scale up on a copy machine to fit 10 x 15 accurately, provided you do your layouts in scale to that dimension. Example - if you want to eventually do your pages at 10 x 15, then your layouts could be something like 5 x 7.5 or similar - the ratio is 2 to 3.

If you want to print them from your computer, scan your reduced layouts at the size your worked at( 100 %), and then scale them up in something like Photoshop, using the Transform tools ( Most image-editing software has transform-type functions if you don't have PS ).

Again, if your layouts are in proportion, you'll be able to scale 'em up in the computer and then print 'em out onto 11 x 17 at Kinko's or a similar copy shop.

prochristi86
11-04-2006, 02:00 PM
This is very interesting. Right now, I just draw the layouts very loosely, and draw directly onto the board. I have a lightbox, but I don't use it at all. What are the benefits to using the layout-blown-up method you are talking about? Also, I *think* I remember Lee saying that he draws everything directly onto the board with no tracing - do you remember that? I would like to learn about the pros/cons of this technique.

Thanks!

James

shushubag
11-04-2006, 03:17 PM
This is very interesting. Right now, I just draw the layouts very loosely, and draw directly onto the board. I have a lightbox, but I don't use it at all. What are the benefits to using the layout-blown-up method you are talking about? Also, I *think* I remember Lee saying that he draws everything directly onto the board with no tracing - do you remember that? I would like to learn about the pros/cons of this technique.

Thanks!

James

Well I don't know which Mr. Lee you are talking about but I was refering to Rob Liefeld on youtube.

I also seen Jim Lee if that's the Mr. Lee you are refering too. This was taken back from a clip in the 90s and he did not draw onto the artboard he layed out on vellum I think then from there lightboxed onto the artboard. He may do it differently now but I have no clue.

The pros to having a light-box is you can flip it over and find a whole bunch of mistakes that wouldn't normally be seen by looking at it straight on. This way you can correct mistakes. It also allows you to trace your own work onto where ever it is you want it to go.

For instance I can draw at my job but I can't take the artboards with me, that'd get me fired. But I can take some 8 x 11 typing paper, hide my script in the stack of paper and draw while I'm not busy (for some reason it's ok alot of people do it). If there's something I really like I take the drawing back home to my lightbox, correct mistakes, and transfer what was drawn at work.

Another pro for me is that because I'm right-handed, I draw from right to left. But comics read from left to right. The light box allows me to flip that over and it'll now read from left to right. I have a hard time drawing faces facing right (I can do it but it doesn't look as good) so the light-box lets me flip that over so it's facing left.

The cons to using the light box is that alot of the energy and excitement gets lost in translation. It's like drawing the same thing over and over again after the first time it just doesn't feel as raw or have as much energy but the upside is that it's proportionally correct.

Scribbly
11-04-2006, 03:41 PM
This is very interesting. Right now, I just draw the layouts very loosely, and draw directly onto the board. I have a lightbox, but I don't use it at all. What are the benefits to using the layout-blown-up method you are talking about? Also, I *think* I remember Lee saying that he draws everything directly onto the board with no tracing - do you remember that? I would like to learn about the pros/cons of this technique.

Thanks!

James

The blow up sistem is a cane, a helper.
Used to bring you more confidence in the final step, the clean up.
Artists with thousand hours of continuum flying can do that in once.
That is a level to reach.
Like in Martial Arts.
But for the rest of the mortals, better is to trace the comic size in a A4 copy paper and start working there.
Panel distribution, composition,proportions, perspective, poses, attitude, expressions, text space baloon composition etc.
You can change, erase or redo everything, any time, even start again.
Till all the page concept seems solid to you.
Sometimes when you work directly in big size you suppose that you are reached the Tension point, but it is lost when you reduce the page in final print size .
Working small you can calculate the final effect with more precision, avoiding gaps, dead spaces ect.
When the whole page is constructed, then you blow up it in big size.
And start the final definition without harm the board surface.
To preserve the board is going to save your posterior inking work.

prochristi86
11-05-2006, 10:47 AM
shushubag, Scribbly; thank you very much. This was very informative!

MadCow Menu
11-05-2006, 11:05 PM
I have a mustek scanner and it doesn't print out anything on it what do I need to blow it up and print out an 11 x 17 paper?

Do I need a copy machine?
Split the 11X17 roughs into 2 pieces and print both halves out on regular paper. Then tape em together. Don't need to waste time going to Kinkos--- you have a printer at home.

shushubag
11-06-2006, 04:40 AM
Split the 11X17 roughs into 2 pieces and print both halves out on regular paper. Then tape em together. Don't need to waste time going to Kinkos--- you have a printer at home.

Yeah I guess that's the next step since I'm trying to save money. I just need to figure out how to print the thing out evenly.